ISACA Cybersecurity Fundamentals Certificate?

zippie666zippie666 Posts: 29Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi,

Anyone else preparing for the Cybersecurity Fundamentals exam that will become available in October?
http://www.isaca.org/cyber/Documents/Cybersecurity-Fundamentals-Certificate-Fact-Sheet_pre_Eng_0414.pdf

I've bought the book and am currently studying on my own for this, this will be an entry-level technical certificate as I understood it.

Anyone else doing this?
Current cert:
MCSA: Windows 7, 8 & Server 2008
EXIN ITIL v3 Foundation
EXIN ISO 27002 Foundations
CIW Web Professional
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Comments

  • CyberfiSecurityCyberfiSecurity Posts: 184Member
    zippie666 wrote: »
    Hi,

    Anyone else preparing for the Cybersecurity Fundamentals exam that will become available in October?
    http://www.isaca.org/cyber/Documents/Cybersecurity-Fundamentals-Certificate-Fact-Sheet_pre_Eng_0414.pdf

    I've bought the book and am currently studying on my own for this, this will be an entry-level technical certificate as I understood it.

    Anyone else doing this?

    I am not doing it or seeing will it. The Cybersecurity Fundamentals at ISACA just an introduction to information security. This can be satisfied with CompTIA Security+, which is more widely acceptable. I know ISACA brand is presgitous; however, ISACA is best known for audit and risk accessment not general informaiton security likes CompTIA Security+ for beginner and (ISC)2 CISSP advance. I still recommend CompTIA Security+ or (ISC)2 CSSP; at is a DoD 8750 satisfaction. Also, you'll see more acceptable across private and public organizations.

    My rule of thumb is searching for certification with most result in the job site. I usually do not take certification that is less known to avoid so many certification in resume. This helps me to avoid wasting my money and time, instead focusing on security lab for technical skills.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Vice President | Citigroup, Inc.
    President/CEO | Agility Fidelis, Inc.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,846Mod Mod
    Good point. OP, what is your objective by going with this certificate instead of something more widely known?
  • zippie666zippie666 Posts: 29Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Well, I'm currently working as a support engineer / system engineer, I work with Exchange, AD, Citrix etc but I'd like to get into security but it's a difficult niche within IT to break into (pun intended). Reason why I choose ISACA is because I also go to their events on my local chapter, and I'd hope that trought the people I meet there I might get a chance on an entry-level job in security. It's the combination of networking and some entry-level certs that I hope will land me a job. First I'll go for the ISACA CSX, next thing planned is upgrade to MCSA Windows Server 2012, after that I'm thinking of Security+ or CEH, not sure yet.

    Thanks for you insights!
    Current cert:
    MCSA: Windows 7, 8 & Server 2008
    EXIN ITIL v3 Foundation
    EXIN ISO 27002 Foundations
    CIW Web Professional
  • CyberfiSecurityCyberfiSecurity Posts: 184Member
    I am not sure if people could help you to find a job; I had never had any luck with local meetup. I attended Georgetown University for my second Master degree for networking and getting paid to go to college purposes. But I did not get hooking up with a job. The best way to get into the security domain withi IT field is tailor your resume and working on your security knowledge and labs. If you are working in Support Engineer/System Engineer, I am sure you have to deal with security sometimes. Example, created/disable/enable, chagne pass word = SECURITY ACCESS CONTROL.

    Start with Security+ --->Ethical Hacker ---> CISA ---> CISSP (No experience, start with Associate).
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Vice President | Citigroup, Inc.
    President/CEO | Agility Fidelis, Inc.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,497Admin Admin
    I'm guessing that ISACA's cybersecurity cert is not nearly as technical as other intro cybersecurity certs (e.g., Security+, CASP, CEH), and this cert's marketing niche is cybersecurity knowledge assurance for auditors and risk managers.
  • ITSecurity1ITSecurity1 Posts: 19Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I took the ISACA's cybersecurity cert and passed. I thought it was a solid exam that covers all the topics of IT security at a high level. Having the CERT, I don't think it will hurt especially if you are a IT jack of all trades like myself. If you are going to take the exam, buy the study guide, the test is based off that study material in my opinion. For heavy IT Security people they would know most of the info and would just need to brush up, but if your not in security day to day or are new, then know that study guide word for word and you will pass. I didn't think the test was tricky or confusing, it was very much similar to a college final exam. Just know the material, memorization and you will be fine.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,497Admin Admin
  • dou2bledou2ble Posts: 160Member
    I wonder if for non DOD spaces that target 8570 compliance one would be better off going for this cert instead. Personally S+ is a waste of time and only worth taking for DOD jobs because of 8570. Most don't even get enough of an Information security foundational knowledge through it, IMO.

    If one isn't targeting DOD jobs I would definitely go for CISA instead of S+. If CISA is too tough then this cert might be a solid stepping stone. Not to mention the ISACA member benefits over CompTIA. For commerical audit you can find tons of stuff through their knowledge service alone.
    2015 Goals: Masters in Cyber Security
  • Gregster1Gregster1 Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I took the ISACA's cybersecurity cert and passed. I thought it was a solid exam that covers all the topics of IT security at a high level. Having the CERT, I don't think it will hurt especially if you are a IT jack of all trades like myself. If you are going to take the exam, buy the study guide, the test is based off that study material in my opinion. For heavy IT Security people they would know most of the info and would just need to brush up, but if your not in security day to day or are new, then know that study guide word for word and you will pass. I didn't think the test was tricky or confusing, it was very much similar to a college final exam. Just know the material, memorization and you will be fine.

    Dear ITSecurity1 - You mentioned you recently passed the new ISACA cybersecurity exam. Could you please give me a feel for how much study time or prep you put into this? I have never been a formal security 'specialist/administrator', but have been in IT my entire career... much of it somewhat technical/infrastructure/security related. (I may be somewhat similar to you as a IT jack of all trades.) I recently passed the ISACA CISA exam... and I get the feeling from your original post that the cybersecurity exam may not be as intensive as the CISA. Is this correct? Thank-you.
  • ITSecurity1ITSecurity1 Posts: 19Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Gregster1 - I would stay about two weeks. One week to read the book(straight forward read and actually not boring) and understand the material. The second week for study questions, go over definitions, firm grasp of security concepts and threats. I would not say it was easy nor is it sweating bullets hard. I tend to study a bit harder\longer for tests as I'm not a great test taker. I like use math as a rating with (5)Trig being difficult and (1)Add\Sub being close my eyes easy. I say this exam was a 3 as everyone knows Algebra, however you may need to brush up.

    Test Rating Scale:
    5 - Trig
    4 - Cal
    3 - Alg
    2 - Mul\Div
    1 - Add\Sub

    Hope this helps
  • EZstreetEZstreet Posts: 18Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Just posted this in another thread.

    Well for what it's worth. I passed the exam yesterday and was much more difficult that I was expecting. Seems like the questions were worded 'weird' for lack of a better term. They were covered in the material but not presented in same fashion. And for anyone that is studying the online course of the 150 questions given in the section assessments and knowledge checks don't count them being on the test. I only saw 5 or 6 out of the 75 questions that were pretty much the same as the course.

    My rating would also be about a 3+ on the scale. I started studying the manual early March and signed up for the online course in mid-March. I studied few hours at a time two days a week. I can't absorb more than that at any one sitting.

    Regards,
    EZ
  • ninasantiago1987ninasantiago1987 Posts: 2Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hi EZstreet,
    I would like to uderstand how the foundation exam has been deisgned, is it more to do with network packet stuffs or designing systems to be cyber secure. Please advise
    EZstreet wrote: »
    Just posted this in another thread.

    Well for what it's worth. I passed the exam yesterday and was much more difficult that I was expecting. Seems like the questions were worded 'weird' for lack of a better term. They were covered in the material but not presented in same fashion. And for anyone that is studying the online course of the 150 questions given in the section assessments and knowledge checks don't count them being on the test. I only saw 5 or 6 out of the 75 questions that were pretty much the same as the course.

    My rating would also be about a 3+ on the scale. I started studying the manual early March and signed up for the online course in mid-March. I studied few hours at a time two days a week. I can't absorb more than that at any one sitting.

    Regards,
    EZ
  • Franz JosephFranz Joseph Posts: 2Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I hope someone is kind enough to share the online questions.

    Are the percentage of questions ( more on database, application, network security --for about 40%) as mentioned in the exam guide aligned with actual exams?
  • thehayn1thehayn1 Posts: 46Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    If you're trying to get into security, just as has been said here... start your path with Sec+. Trust me, it's the best way to go. It'll give you a solid baseline to branch off of whether you decide to go the CEH route or CHFI route. And ideally end up with CISSP or CISM. Not to mention it's the most recognized baseline cert in security. The military makes it a requirement for anyone filing an administrative role even if you don't work in a security field, so that should speak at least a little to it's validity.
  • ninasantiago1987ninasantiago1987 Posts: 2Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hi Franz - are you preparing for this exam? have you got the materials?

    I hope someone is kind enough to share the online questions.

    Are the percentage of questions ( more on database, application, network security --for about 40%) as mentioned in the exam guide aligned with actual exams?
  • stormgalstormgal Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I don't know about this cert, as the word, "Fundamentals" may not necessarily be assuring to an employer. I'd just study for something else advanced like CEH, CISSP or CISM. I could be wrong, but it's what I'm thinking.
  • TongyTongy Posts: 234Member
    The word "essentials" doesn't appear to detract from the GSEC certs reputation.

    anything that gets you on the first rung of one of the modern worlds quickest developing professions is fine by me!

    I might do it, it doesn't cost much and might actually teach you something!
  • RemedympRemedymp Posts: 834Member
    stormgal wrote: »
    I don't know about this cert, as the word, "Fundamentals" may not necessarily be assuring to an employer. I'd just study for something else advanced like CEH, CISSP or CISM. I could be wrong, but it's what I'm thinking.

    You can't sit these exams mentioned unless you meet the prerequsites each one.
  • Mike-MikeMike-Mike Posts: 1,860Member
    I was just looking into this the other day
    Currently Working On

    CWTS, then WireShark
  • VenpVenp Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    All, Last week i have downloaded the book, i was under impression that ISACA has launched cyber sec fundamental cert recently but now i realized that its been more then 9 months.. am planning to appear for the exam in the first week of Aug... any inputs from your end... am from Networking background.. thanks
  • beadsbeads Senior Member Posts: 1,455Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    What many people in the industry, yours truly included, are hoping from ISACA is a more technically advanced, in the trenches exam closer to the GSE effect without being tied to a Master's program or CCIE. Great concept but not one organization has been able to pull it off though OCSE has the right idea but lacks the closed door, no access needed to be considered legitimate. Sorry, the tools and test is well known and not difficult to find the information head of time to pass.

    To the early exam passers the glory. Everyone else is really following someone else's published guide. In other words: the lower the certificate number the better.

    - b/eads
  • shameer1978shameer1978 Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    have you done exam?
  • shiliba.gasparishiliba.gaspari Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I am also, planning to sit for the exam in a near future, any one with recent news on the exam...,
  • TunYauTunYau Posts: 58Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I taken twice.. First attempt pass with 69... Second attempt 84..
    take second time cause requirement to be trainer score at least 75
  • mc26mc26 Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Currently studying for this certificate(i understand it is not a certification) right now. I am new to the IT field but so far its going well. Anyone have any tips for me in general? and how to learn the material for the future exams? Thanks
  • TunYauTunYau Posts: 58Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    It is an exam. online taken from anywhere with online proctor. you need view am for them to monitor u.
    you can purchase the study guide at ISACAa website.
  • FSF150FSF150 Senior Member Posts: 118Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Bumping this as I just completed the exam today. I used the book and the Cybrary Sec+ videos as study resources.

    CSX is not particularly technical. I'd describe it as being able to hold down an intelligent conversation about cybersecurity definitions, threats, and defenses today. A good resource for management, auditors, etc.

    CSX-P looks much more technical, but considering the cost I think it'd be more something you got your employer to pay for after you were already hired as a cybersecurity tech.
    First we drink the coffee. Then we do the things. :neutral:
  • RemedympRemedymp Posts: 834Member
    FSF150 wrote: »
    Bumping this as I just completed the exam today. I used the book and the Cybrary Sec+ videos as study resources.

    CSX is not particularly technical. I'd describe it as being able to hold down an intelligent conversation about cybersecurity definitions, threats, and defenses today. A good resource for management, auditors, etc.

    CSX-P looks much more technical, but considering the cost I think it'd be more something you got your employer to pay for after you were already hired as a cybersecurity tech.

    The fundamentals exam is a certificate and not a certification. The CSX-P and CSX-S are performance based certifications and will probably trump all the other related certifications once they all go live.
  • FSF150FSF150 Senior Member Posts: 118Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Remedymp wrote: »
    The fundamentals exam is a certificate and not a certification. The CSX-P and CSX-S are performance based certifications and will probably trump all the other related certifications once they all go live.

    The curriculum for CSX-P definitely looks thorough. I imagine it'll hold weight.
    First we drink the coffee. Then we do the things. :neutral:
  • RaystafarianRaystafarian Posts: 87Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    ISACA is really starting to push the CSX certifications in most of their media, at least as an ISACA member.
    Hit me up on LinkedIn - just mention you're from techexams.
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