Why are their so many Support Positions in IT?

Basic85Basic85 Member Posts: 189 ■■■□□□□□□□
I know it maybe a dumb question but when I'm job searching, almost everything for me at least has the word Support in the title.  Everytime I hear "Support", "Support Engineer", etc I hear the phone ringing.  I currently work in IT Support myself, and it's a call center, trying to escape the call center but I'm stuck, just over 4 years.  Seems like hiring managers are looking for candidates with experience in this and that but how can I get the experience if I can't get the job?  I homelab as well but I have some time constraints.  The second you say "No, I don't have experience in this", than out the door I go, it's like most can learn on the job in about a couple of months.  

I'm in my late 30's, about to approach 40 so scared still no high paying career.  I'm beginning to think IT is not for me, I keep failing the technical test during interviews and have failed cert test as well.  Currently studying for Security+.   I want to get into something else like cybersecurity, networking, or even programming, or possibly something else entirely different. 

Thoughts?  

Comments

  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,227 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Are there other tech roles at your current employer? 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Basic85Basic85 Member Posts: 189 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Are there other tech roles at your current employer? 

    I did think about that, maybe level 2 support but for some reason it's hard to get it.  After working for my current company, I don't really want to stay there anymore.  The pay is low and a lot of employees complain about that openly, turnover is high.  

    I'm going to start selling myself more in interviews even if I don't know the skill that well like SQL, I'll just say I know it and if they test me and I fail oh well on to the next.  I'm pretty sure the other candidates are doing the same if not worse.  My issues during interviews is that I'm too dame honest.  

    I'm seriously considering leaving with nothing lined up and I do have substantial savings.  


  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Member Posts: 2,753 ■■■■■■■■■■
    edited January 27
    Learning to code is huge when it comes to these high level roles.  While I like SQL and know it quite well +10 years, stand alone it doesn't bring as much punch to the fight like it used to.  Back in 2010 - 2015 that skill alone fetched me jobs right and left, but IMO that's not the case anymore.  Companies are moving to the cloud and instead of batching data they are moving to streaming.  I have turned full attention to Python and two particular libraries, PySpark and Pandas.  Scala and Java are huge as well.  These are preferred but I have 5 years in Python no way I am going to start over again, lol.  

    Just being able to query a database, even complex queries doesn't bring as much to the table anymore.  
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 1,046 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited January 27
    Basic85 said:

    I know it maybe a dumb question but when I'm job searching, almost everything for me at least has the word Support in the title.  Everytime I hear "Support", "Support Engineer", etc I hear the phone ringing.  I currently work in IT Support myself, and it's a call center, trying to escape the call center but I'm stuck, just over 4 years.  Seems like hiring managers are looking for candidates with experience in this and that but how can I get the experience if I can't get the job?  I homelab as well but I have some time constraints.  The second you say "No, I don't have experience in this", than out the door I go, it's like most can learn on the job in about a couple of months.  

    I'm in my late 30's, about to approach 40 so scared still no high paying career.  I'm beginning to think IT is not for me, I keep failing the technical test during interviews and have failed cert test as well.  Currently studying for Security+.   I want to get into something else like cybersecurity, networking, or even programming, or possibly something else entirely different. 

    Thoughts?  

    There's NO dumb question here :)


    If you've been at the job for that long... but have No Certifications to show for it....  then that's kinda your own fault.

    Complacency is a career killer.

    I'm glad you're working on your Security+...  but it's only an introductory certification.
    the Sec+ (by itself) is NOT going to deliever you something better, 
    You need to figure out/ pick a Focus, and then work toward that.

    Networking, Cloud, Microsft, Linux, whatever....
    just follow your interest.
    You say you have a "homelab".  What kind of lab is it? What are you trying to learn?


    To be honest,
    it kinda sounds like you're only in IT because of the promise of better $$$.
    That desire alone... is okay to have; but it may NOT be enough to get you to your goal.


    Maybe you're right.... perhaps consider finding something outside of IT.
    Perhaps trade school? be a Plumber or Electrician or something?
    I've heard they make decent money.

    Whatever you do... choose wisely... the "clock" is ticking.


    For what it's worth,
    i didnt get into Networking until i was 38 years old; so you definitely still have time to find the right fit.
    But i was lucky... i picked a specialty that turned out to be really Interesting to me.
    That's what kept me motivated.


    Oh, whatever you do....  it sounds like you may need to find a new employer regardless.

    Once upon a time (long ago) i breifly thought about getting out of I.T. altogether. But it turned out... it was the job ( at the time) that was really the problem.
    I made a lateral move to somewhere else, and things immediately became much better.

    How much do you make currently?


  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,227 ■■■■■■■■■■
    What type of technologies does your employer use? Depending on what you have access to, that might be a good place to start. If you're in a Cisco shop, see if you can get access to a test environment and go in that direction. If your employer is using any cloud service providers, then start learning those skills with all of the free material offered (I know AWS and Azure have plenty of content available). You just have to choose something and move forward. 

    Good luck!
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Basic85Basic85 Member Posts: 189 ■■■□□□□□□□
    volfkhat said:
    Basic85 said:

    I know it maybe a dumb question but when I'm job searching, almost everything for me at least has the word Support in the title.  Everytime I hear "Support", "Support Engineer", etc I hear the phone ringing.  I currently work in IT Support myself, and it's a call center, trying to escape the call center but I'm stuck, just over 4 years.  Seems like hiring managers are looking for candidates with experience in this and that but how can I get the experience if I can't get the job?  I homelab as well but I have some time constraints.  The second you say "No, I don't have experience in this", than out the door I go, it's like most can learn on the job in about a couple of months.  

    I'm in my late 30's, about to approach 40 so scared still no high paying career.  I'm beginning to think IT is not for me, I keep failing the technical test during interviews and have failed cert test as well.  Currently studying for Security+.   I want to get into something else like cybersecurity, networking, or even programming, or possibly something else entirely different. 

    Thoughts?  

    There's NO dumb question here :)


    If you've been at the job for that long... but have No Certifications to show for it....  then that's kinda your own fault.

    Complacency is a career killer.

    I'm glad you're working on your Security+...  but it's only an introductory certification.
    the Sec+ (by itself) is NOT going to deliever you something better, 
    You need to figure out/ pick a Focus, and then work toward that.

    Networking, Cloud, Microsft, Linux, whatever....
    just follow your interest.
    You say you have a "homelab".  What kind of lab is it? What are you trying to learn?


    To be honest,
    it kinda sounds like you're only in IT because of the promise of better $$$.
    That desire alone... is okay to have; but it may NOT be enough to get you to your goal.


    Maybe you're right.... perhaps consider finding something outside of IT.
    Perhaps trade school? be a Plumber or Electrician or something?
    I've heard they make decent money.

    Whatever you do... choose wisely... the "clock" is ticking.


    For what it's worth,
    i didnt get into Networking until i was 38 years old; so you definitely still have time to find the right fit.
    But i was lucky... i picked a specialty that turned out to be really Interesting to me.
    That's what kept me motivated.


    Oh, whatever you do....  it sounds like you may need to find a new employer regardless.

    Once upon a time (long ago) i breifly thought about getting out of I.T. altogether. But it turned out... it was the job ( at the time) that was really the problem.
    I made a lateral move to somewhere else, and things immediately became much better.

    How much do you make currently?



    I enjoy IT and working this field, it's mainly this job that's killing me, IT call centers are no joke, I'm suprised I made it this long.  

    Money is a good factor in almost any field though that wasn't the main reason why I wanted to be in IT, I enjoy technology and working with it. 

    In my mind, I'm thinking I focus on one thing and become good at it but than employer want's something else, it's like what gives?  I can't be the jack of all trades though I feel like it sometimes.  

    I've also gotten very little time to interview without possibly getting into trouble at my current job.  People say, "Doctors appointment" but how many times can you use that?  I need more time to interview because at this point for me at least, it's a numbers game and this job is getting in my way so I may ask for an earlier shift like 5am-2pm, that way I can schedule interviews say at 2:30pm.  At this point I'm ready to risk it in order to gain it all, meaning risk getting fired at my current job.  

    How much do I make?
    It's not much, very little, probably minimum wage, in fact fast food workers make more than me, it's right under $20 an hour.  




  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 2,227 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Basic85 said:
    volfkhat said:
    Basic85 said:

    I know it maybe a dumb question but when I'm job searching, almost everything for me at least has the word Support in the title.  Everytime I hear "Support", "Support Engineer", etc I hear the phone ringing.  I currently work in IT Support myself, and it's a call center, trying to escape the call center but I'm stuck, just over 4 years.  Seems like hiring managers are looking for candidates with experience in this and that but how can I get the experience if I can't get the job?  I homelab as well but I have some time constraints.  The second you say "No, I don't have experience in this", than out the door I go, it's like most can learn on the job in about a couple of months.  

    I'm in my late 30's, about to approach 40 so scared still no high paying career.  I'm beginning to think IT is not for me, I keep failing the technical test during interviews and have failed cert test as well.  Currently studying for Security+.   I want to get into something else like cybersecurity, networking, or even programming, or possibly something else entirely different. 

    Thoughts?  

    There's NO dumb question here :)


    If you've been at the job for that long... but have No Certifications to show for it....  then that's kinda your own fault.

    Complacency is a career killer.

    I'm glad you're working on your Security+...  but it's only an introductory certification.
    the Sec+ (by itself) is NOT going to deliever you something better, 
    You need to figure out/ pick a Focus, and then work toward that.

    Networking, Cloud, Microsft, Linux, whatever....
    just follow your interest.
    You say you have a "homelab".  What kind of lab is it? What are you trying to learn?


    To be honest,
    it kinda sounds like you're only in IT because of the promise of better $$$.
    That desire alone... is okay to have; but it may NOT be enough to get you to your goal.


    Maybe you're right.... perhaps consider finding something outside of IT.
    Perhaps trade school? be a Plumber or Electrician or something?
    I've heard they make decent money.

    Whatever you do... choose wisely... the "clock" is ticking.


    For what it's worth,
    i didnt get into Networking until i was 38 years old; so you definitely still have time to find the right fit.
    But i was lucky... i picked a specialty that turned out to be really Interesting to me.
    That's what kept me motivated.


    Oh, whatever you do....  it sounds like you may need to find a new employer regardless.

    Once upon a time (long ago) i breifly thought about getting out of I.T. altogether. But it turned out... it was the job ( at the time) that was really the problem.
    I made a lateral move to somewhere else, and things immediately became much better.

    How much do you make currently?



    I've also gotten very little time to interview without possibly getting into trouble at my current job.  People say, "Doctors appointment" but how many times can you use that?  I need more time to interview because at this point for me at least, it's a numbers game and this job is getting in my way so I may ask for an earlier shift like 5am-2pm, that way I can schedule interviews say at 2:30pm.  At this point I'm ready to risk it in order to gain it all, meaning risk getting fired at my current job.  
    Hiring managers understand that applicants have to work around their current work schedule. At least for the phone screening, I have been able to do them early in the morning before work or even during lunch breaks. For face-to-face, I've even been able to have interviews at the end of the business hours. If something is very promising and you really want to go for it, then use some PTO for interviews if you must. Since covid, I don't think I've been on a face-to-face interview so I assume other employers can accomodate that. 
    Alphabet soup from (ISC)2, ISACA, GIAC, EC-Council, Microsoft, ITIL, Cisco, Scrum, CompTIA, AWS
  • Basic85Basic85 Member Posts: 189 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Basic85 said:
    volfkhat said:
    Basic85 said:

    I know it maybe a dumb question but when I'm job searching, almost everything for me at least has the word Support in the title.  Everytime I hear "Support", "Support Engineer", etc I hear the phone ringing.  I currently work in IT Support myself, and it's a call center, trying to escape the call center but I'm stuck, just over 4 years.  Seems like hiring managers are looking for candidates with experience in this and that but how can I get the experience if I can't get the job?  I homelab as well but I have some time constraints.  The second you say "No, I don't have experience in this", than out the door I go, it's like most can learn on the job in about a couple of months.  

    I'm in my late 30's, about to approach 40 so scared still no high paying career.  I'm beginning to think IT is not for me, I keep failing the technical test during interviews and have failed cert test as well.  Currently studying for Security+.   I want to get into something else like cybersecurity, networking, or even programming, or possibly something else entirely different. 

    Thoughts?  

    There's NO dumb question here :)


    If you've been at the job for that long... but have No Certifications to show for it....  then that's kinda your own fault.

    Complacency is a career killer.

    I'm glad you're working on your Security+...  but it's only an introductory certification.
    the Sec+ (by itself) is NOT going to deliever you something better, 
    You need to figure out/ pick a Focus, and then work toward that.

    Networking, Cloud, Microsft, Linux, whatever....
    just follow your interest.
    You say you have a "homelab".  What kind of lab is it? What are you trying to learn?


    To be honest,
    it kinda sounds like you're only in IT because of the promise of better $$$.
    That desire alone... is okay to have; but it may NOT be enough to get you to your goal.


    Maybe you're right.... perhaps consider finding something outside of IT.
    Perhaps trade school? be a Plumber or Electrician or something?
    I've heard they make decent money.

    Whatever you do... choose wisely... the "clock" is ticking.


    For what it's worth,
    i didnt get into Networking until i was 38 years old; so you definitely still have time to find the right fit.
    But i was lucky... i picked a specialty that turned out to be really Interesting to me.
    That's what kept me motivated.


    Oh, whatever you do....  it sounds like you may need to find a new employer regardless.

    Once upon a time (long ago) i breifly thought about getting out of I.T. altogether. But it turned out... it was the job ( at the time) that was really the problem.
    I made a lateral move to somewhere else, and things immediately became much better.

    How much do you make currently?



    I've also gotten very little time to interview without possibly getting into trouble at my current job.  People say, "Doctors appointment" but how many times can you use that?  I need more time to interview because at this point for me at least, it's a numbers game and this job is getting in my way so I may ask for an earlier shift like 5am-2pm, that way I can schedule interviews say at 2:30pm.  At this point I'm ready to risk it in order to gain it all, meaning risk getting fired at my current job.  
    Hiring managers understand that applicants have to work around their current work schedule. At least for the phone screening, I have been able to do them early in the morning before work or even during lunch breaks. For face-to-face, I've even been able to have interviews at the end of the business hours. If something is very promising and you really want to go for it, then use some PTO for interviews if you must. Since covid, I don't think I've been on a face-to-face interview so I assume other employers can accomodate that. 

    I would hope most hiring managers understand, but I've encountered a few that didn't.  They think I could just drop everything and go talk to them.  It's just an interview not an offer so I may not get one nor I may not accept the offer if one is made.  I had missed a few interviews already due to this job, one in particular was with the government,  they would not budge on the time for the phone interview, so the only tims they had were when I was working.  Next time, if I receive an opportunity for an interview with a job that I really want, I'm going by any means necessary.  

  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 1,046 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited January 29

    Ive heqrd that many Goverment Positions actually care about the Secuirty+ certifiction...

    So i take back my comment about "the Sec+ alone" wont get you anywhere.

    It certain can for some lucky individuals!


    If your current gig has NO Future... then you should NOT be missing any job inteviews lol

    So you make maybe $40,000 a year?

    i see job postings for crappy desktop technicians roles that pay $60k.

    So...yeah, you got to get out of there.
    But make sure it's to a place with a long term Future for your "specialty".


    Again:
    "You say you have a "homelab".  What kind of lab is it? What are you trying to learn?"

    You didnt answer that.
    If the money wasnt a factor... What would youLIKE to do in I.T.?
  • Basic85Basic85 Member Posts: 189 ■■■□□□□□□□
    volfkhat said:

    Ive heqrd that many Goverment Positions actually care about the Secuirty+ certifiction...

    So i take back my comment about "the Sec+ alone" wont get you anywhere.

    It certain can for some lucky individuals!


    If your current gig has NO Future... then you should NOT be missing any job inteviews lol

    So you make maybe $40,000 a year?

    i see job postings for crappy desktop technicians roles that pay $60k.

    So...yeah, you got to get out of there.
    But make sure it's to a place with a long term Future for your "specialty".


    Again:
    "You say you have a "homelab".  What kind of lab is it? What are you trying to learn?"

    You didnt answer that.
    If the money wasnt a factor... What would youLIKE to do in I.T.?

    I've done mainly virtual machines with Windows 2022 server and linux.  Configuring Windows server and learning the commands for linux.  I've also taken many udemy courses as my company offers them for free.  

    You're right I shouldn't be missing interviews, the thing is at that time I didn't want to be a bad employee either (missing work, calling out sick all the time, coming back from breask late, etc) but at some point I'm going to have to risk it.  I've seen past co-workers straight up called out two days in row to attend interviews, if I did that than it would have to be an almost guarantee of an offer.  

    I see myself as a system/network adminstrator, maybe cybersecurity and some programming but definitely not staying in helpdesk call center.  I like government jobs and have applied to many.  


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