Looking for Accredited Online Universities!

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Comments

  • RiskblingRiskbling Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Nuwin wrote: »
    I think you missed the point on Bellevue's comment. They indicate that by taking their coursework in class or online will not matter on your transcripts. There is no indication how the material was received.

    Bellevue is also not a nationally accredited, for-profit school. They're a private, regionally accredited, non-profit in Nebraska.

    Anyway, their point, and my point is that if you go through a traditional school that has an online delivery channel, you get the same degree as the in-class student. There is no distinction between online or in class on your degree or transcripts.

    It's not major league baseball. There is no asterisk.

    If you need online schooling, I suggest the traditional school that now offers coursework in an online format. The fact that this discussion exists shows that there is a negative attitude for some towards the ITT, DeVry, etc. schools of the world. And if we have it, we know hiring managers will also have it.

    I completely understand the message that Bellevue was sending out. However, their statement is worded very shady and unappealing, and almost comes off as a sales pitch. The message they are sending is "Don't worry nobody will find out", because people have a fear that their online degree is not as credible as a traditional degree. As previous posters have said, it is a generation gap. Online degrees are becoming more and more acceptable as technology advances. Either way, there are STILL employers in society that DO discriminate against online degrees.

    P.S. I am at Offutt AFB, so Bellevue University is a trip down the street icon_thumright.gif
  • vColevCole Member Posts: 1,574 ■■■■■■■□□□
    jryan:
    I am sorry but that is there fault. They need to control themselves.
    Most people come out of college with a loan the size of a new car... If you can't handle it don't go to school, seriously.

    I can't even begin to get into this argument.

    Here's my thing:

    I'm 22 years old, I've been working full-time since I was 18 and still in high school. Did I need to? No. But I did anyways.

    Yes I have some student loan debt, but I'd be in a whole hell of a lot more if I was living off loans and not working.

    I work full time, because I can. Yes it's tough, but I believe it makes me a stronger person. In a few years from now when you've seen how much debt you've accrued you may feel differently when that $700/month payment comes in when you're trying to buy a car/house/etc.

    You speak as though your way is the only way. People come from all walks of life.

    I have no problems with peoples opinions but do not go around dictating to others how to live there life. Especially if you do not know the whole story.
  • NuwinNuwin Member Posts: 75 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Riskbling wrote: »
    I completely understand the message that Bellevue was sending out. However, their statement is worded very shady and unappealing, and almost comes off as a sales pitch. The message they are sending is "Don't worry nobody will find out", because people have a fear that their online degree is not as credible as a traditional degree. As previous posters have said, it is a generation gap. Online degrees are becoming more and more acceptable as technology advances. Either way, there are STILL employers in society that DO discriminate against online degrees.

    P.S. I am at Offutt AFB, so Bellevue University is a trip down the street icon_thumright.gif

    Yeah, it is a bit of a sales pitch. So is most of their entire website. Without looking at other universities, I would wager to say it is all similar. They want you to go there. It may be non-profit, but it isn't charity either.

    Why would they say that your "online degree is of lesser value than in-class but is so totally worth doing?" :)

    Anyway, I guess I'm not trying to plug Bellevue necessarily, just relating my experience. I agree that there is a generation gap on the subject. However, I guess I've got my own interpretations of "online degrees" like say U of Phoenix and degrees with "online delivery" such as Bellevue. I see mine as just a degree as it is similar coursework to the in-class variety. Hell, as I type through this, I really think I'm arguing more on the for-profit/non-profit argument than I am delivery channel.
    "By the power of Grayskull"
  • snadamsnadam Member Posts: 2,234 ■■■■□□□□□□
    jryantech wrote: »
    Why at the age of 19 should I have stayed at a job that was complete and utter BS?

    Geeksquad and Firedog are great for beginners but I felt I needed something more challenging so I left and now I am happy with my job.

    And by the way just because you post a lot on these forums and spend your time digging with the search engine doesn't give you any sort of right to try and bully others. My opinion is mine and your opinion is yours. No need to start calling people clowns and ****, its just down right childish.

    No, because at 19, you have barely been out of high school long enough to experience the real world. He's not mad because you have an opinion. Everyone has them (like a-holes icon_lol.gif ), and everyone is entitled to them. He is mad because you make your opinion look like absolute fact, then use deductive reasoning behind it. "I have option A, and option B. I like A, so B sucks." How about you try and form your opinions into SUGGESTIONS? This is called being courteous to others. I have a friend like this, and it drives me insane. And yes, you do come off as a clown when you talk the way you do. You don't know me. You don't know my financial status or my status in life; who the F are you to tell me how to spend my money and go to what school? That is my gut reaction when I read your posts in this thread. Why would I ever listen to you if all you do is reply like this? If you haven't been there, then shut up and let the experienced people talk. If you must say something, then merely suggest. Remember, the vast majority of the people you're talking to are older than you, married, parents, people who have been to school, people who have graduated school, people who have worked in the industry longer than you, and people that have worked in the industry longer than you've been alive.


    PS: Great thread for the most part. The resources and links appear to be helpful!
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  • vColevCole Member Posts: 1,574 ■■■■■■■□□□
    snadam wrote: »
    No, because at 19, you have barely been out of high school long enough to experience the real world. He's not mad because you have an opinion. Everyone has them (like a-holes icon_lol.gif ), and everyone is entitled to them. He is mad because you make your opinion look like absolute fact, then use deductive reasoning behind it. "I have option A, and option B. I like A, so B sucks." How about you try and form your opinions into SUGGESTIONS? This is called being courteous to others. I have a friend like this, and it drives me insane. And yes, you do come off as a clown when you talk the way you do. You don't know me. You don't know my financial status or my status in life; who the F are you to tell me how to spend my money and go to what school? That is my gut reaction when I read your posts in this thread. Why would I ever listen to you if all you do is reply like this? If you haven't been there, then shut up and let the experienced people talk. If you must say something, then merely suggest. Remember, the vast majority of the people you're talking to are older than you, married, parents, people who have been to school, people who have graduated school, people who have worked in the industry longer than you, and people that have worked in the industry longer than you've been alive.


    PS: Great thread for the most part. The resources and links appear to be helpful!

    bowdown.gifbowdown.gifbowdown.gif
  • msteinhilbermsteinhilber Member Posts: 1,480 ■■■■■■■■□□
    skrpune wrote: »
    Agreed. I'm only a couple classes into my CS degree (at a B&M uni), but I can see the gaping difference in results between those who put in the effort and those who don't. Each student should know that it's up to them to do something other than just occasionally show up for class and send texts to their friends/significant other during class, but it's amazing how many folks are hesitant to do read or homework or pay attention or study. It's sad really.

    It's incredible when you consider how much students pay for classes. I have had so many people in my classes be it online or on-campus (I'm in a hybrid program and take some classes entirely online, some entirely on-campus, and some split between the two) that barely put in any effort whatsoever. So many who just want to pass and are good at getting a half-way decent grade but really do not pull anything out of it. They just think the slip of paper at the end is all they need.
  • NuwinNuwin Member Posts: 75 ■■□□□□□□□□
    It's incredible when you consider how much students pay for classes. I have had so many people in my classes be it online or on-campus (I'm in a hybrid program and take some classes entirely online, some entirely on-campus, and some split between the two) that barely put in any effort whatsoever. So many who just want to pass and are good at getting a half-way decent grade but really do not pull anything out of it. They just think the slip of paper at the end is all they need.

    This used to drive me nuts. While I knew it was happening, at least with the online classes, I didn't have to see it.
    "By the power of Grayskull"
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    Although it seems to have become a tad personal, I can definitely see merit in both sides of this discussion which is fundamentally a debt vs. no debt discussion.

    jryantech, I see your point, however, I think that this issue is more of a lack of consideration of the audience here than anything else. Please don't take this is a provocation, that's not my intent.

    You are dealing with a largely self-motivated audience, that is very capable of learning on their own while working the equivalent of 1 or more full-time jobs AND having cars, mortgages, etc... I consider you a part of that audience as well, at least from what I've read. More than likely, this audience would love the opportunity to go to school without working, but by choice or circumstance that's not what they've done, and hence don't really accept that as a valid choice for completing a degree, regardless of the financing options available.

    I have some strong thoughts (maybe they're just opinions) about education, and that often annoys others. I'm ok with that. My thoughts primarily come from my own experience. If I were 17 again and just starting, I wish someone would sit me down and tell me these things.

    I'll summarize my thoughts:

    Paying for school

    1. The best option is if someone else pays your way. The majority of my education was paid for by employers that had tuition reimbursement programs, which I took full advantage of. I worked full-time (sometimes more, in IT) and attended school full-time in both undergraduate and graduate studies.

    2. The 2nd best option is utilizing student loans. This is a form of funding that is intended to provide liquidity in an illiquid market. Churning out engineers, accountants, doctors, etc.. is the fuel of the future economy's engine, and the tax code is (in the US) designed to encourage this behavior.

    Anytime, anyone offers you any amount of money for any period of time, without interest, take it!

    However, this requires discipline, as the last thing you want is to be burdened with debt when you are just starting in your career. The best solution is to understand the cost and benefit of the situation. Pay off the loans as soon after you finish school as possible, or when the interest is costing you more than the tax benefit you are receiving.

    Overall, any cost you pay in interest will be offset by two things 1) the tax advantage, and 2) the increased earnings potential you get from having the degree.

    Student loans are often at very competitive interest rates, and you can often move them from bank to bank with grace periods during which time payments are not due and interest does not accrue. Again, take advantage of free money, but stay on top of your stuff or these things can bite you. Those of you that hate debt, this is not for you, but that's a choice. Personally, anytime anyone wants to give me free money and lets me defer payment I'm taking it (I regularly stay heavily margined in my brokerage account...the interest rate is incredibly low and tax deductible. The earnings I generate well exceed the cost of the interest).

    3. The third best option is to just straight pay for it yourself. This can be tough at an age when financial resources are scarce. There is definitely something to be said for only buying the things you can afford, and if that's your approach, then that's the best one for you. I respect this approach if it's the one for you.

    What to study

    1. Pursue a degree path that lets you earn a B.S. within four years. B.S. degrees typically have more stringent science requirements, and will allow you more options later on.

    2. Generally, unless you are pursuing a few very specific careers (like "accountant" or "engineer"), what you study in undergrad is irrelevant. What is most relevant is getting a degree as quickly as possible. Save your specialization for graduate school.

    3. What you learn is a whole lot different than what you study in school or how you study it. The delivery mode is irrelevant. What is relevant is the amount of effort you put into it.

    4. Multiple undegrad. degrees do not generally provide a benefit worth the cost in time and money, unless you want to pursue some specific career that requires an additional, more specific undergrad degree. Trust me on this, I don't even list all of the degrees that I have on my resume, or LinkedIn.

    Where to study

    1. The ability of your degree to work for you is largely due to the reputation of the school. Pick the most well-known school with the best reputation possible that you can attend. Generally, schools organized on a purely for-profit basis do not have the best reputations.

    2. Your social network can also depend quite a bit on where you went to school. This can often be more helpful to you than you any degree.

    Graduate school

    1. Again, reputation of the school is the deciding factor. An MBA from blah-blah online school says nothing about the effort you put into it (which might have been significant), but an MBA from a top-20 school definitely says something. Hiring managers do not necessary know you, but they've all likely heard of the top-rated schools.

    2. Specialize in graduate school. Take a program that requires a thesis. This is a chance to contribute to the body of knowledge in your field.

    Online or traditional

    1. Again, this is irrelevant. Whatever works best for you is fine. The bigger concern is the reputation of the school that you choose.

    Accreditation

    1. Every school hiding behind this "we're accredited" nonsense is dis-ingenious. Any school that wants to can achieve accreditation. Read about accreditation in the United States, it's really a mess and tells you very little about the quality of the school.

    Miscellaneous

    1. At some schools, credits earned expire after a certain period of time. This is very important if you have not completed a degree. There are various "credit banks", some more reputable than others, that will let you bank your credits (for a fee) so that they do not expire and you can transfer them in the future. No one wants to retake English 13xx....

    That's about all I have for now, so I'm going to take a break and get back to enjoying beautiful New Jersey.

    MS
  • HeroPsychoHeroPsycho Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,940
    Seriously, something should also be pointed out about loans. I personally didn't take out any student loans to get my degree. I came out of high school with an academic scholarship paying for half of everything. I worked part time through college as a full time student to avoid debt. To do this, I had to put up living at home during that time, which unbelievably sucked, but I came out debt free aside from $1000 maybe on the credit card for miscellaneous stuff like parking permits and textbooks. Aside from maybe allowing me to move out, a student loan would not have allowed me to finish school earlier than I did. I had my master's, bachelor's, and a minor in five years; about the only way I could have gotten through faster is by taking more summer classes than I already took, and intercession classes during the winter break, which I worked full time instead to afford the next semester. Most semesters were packed with between 16-18 credit hours.

    With that said, considering the low interest typically on student loans and tax deductions, determine how long it would take you to get through college with one vs. without one. If it takes you two years longer without a loan, and the degree is gonna improve your earning potential let's say by 10k/yr, that two years of +10K/yr in salary might more than pay for the interest on the student loan, not to mention going through college as a full time student is cheaper than as a part time student when you add it all up.

    This is the kind of reason I say that while debt is generally not good, it's not always bad, and taking a student loan out if it gets you through school faster and happier, absolutely nothing wrong with that, and it's often times smarter to do it, too.
    Good luck to all!
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    HeroPsycho wrote: »
    Seriously, something should also be pointed out about loans. I personally didn't take out any student loans to get my degree. I came out of high school with an academic scholarship paying for half of everything. I worked part time through college as a full time student to avoid debt. To do this, I had to put up living at home during that time, which unbelievably sucked, but I came out debt free aside from $1000 maybe on the credit card for miscellaneous stuff like parking permits and textbooks. Aside from maybe allowing me to move out, a student loan would not have allowed me to finish school earlier than I did. I had my master's, bachelor's, and a minor in five years; about the only way I could have gotten through faster is by taking more summer classes than I already took, and intercession classes during the winter break, which I worked full time instead to afford the next semester. Most semesters were packed with between 16-18 credit hours.

    With that said, considering the low interest typically on student loans and tax deductions, determine how long it would take you to get through college with one vs. without one. If it takes you two years longer without a loan, and the degree is gonna improve your earning potential let's say by 10k/yr, that two years of +10K/yr in salary might more than pay for the interest on the student loan, not to mention going through college as a full time student is cheaper than as a part time student when you add it all up.

    This is the kind of reason I say that while debt is generally not good, it's not always bad, and taking a student loan out if it gets you through school faster and happier, absolutely nothing wrong with that, and it's often times smarter to do it, too.

    I couldn't agree with this approach more. Most decisions like this are some form of cost/benefit analysis. It's worth it to think it all out in this fashion.

    Generally, I agree that debt is not a good thing. However, as I've said, when it's free then it's ok. I've been known to do countless "12 months same as cash deals". The vendor is betting that I won't pay whatever it is off, and I'm betting that I will. These things are great as long as you have the discipline to pay them off before the interest hits.

    3 Types of Debt that are acceptable, IMO:

    1. Home mortgage - The tax codes encourage home investment by allowing you to deduct qualifying interest as well as qualifying property taxes (if you are renting, you are losing significant tax deductions). A second home mortgage is good as well (my uncle has an RV that he deducts as a 2nd home...it has to have a bathroom and a kitchen I believe to qualify).

    2. Margin interest - Leveraging some asset to increase buying power. The interest is almost always very low on this if you're approved for it. And it is one of the few forms of interest that is tax-deductible.

    3. School loan interest - Again, the tax codes encourage this, by allowing deductions up to a specific annual salary (I can't remember what it is, but I know that many people on here without degrees easily exceed this annual amount).

    MS
  • jryantechjryantech Member Posts: 623
    You speak as though your way is the only way. People come from all walks of life.

    I have no problems with peoples opinions but do not go around dictating to others how to live there life. Especially if you do not know the whole story.

    Again I will restate that these are my opinions and I am entitled to them as you are entitled to yours. I don't know the whole story... this is why I said "If you're young or even if you're older and you don't have any obligations but maybe a significant other"

    Some of you are just out to cause drama. I am just stating my opinions. My god.
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  • NuwinNuwin Member Posts: 75 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Great posts eMeS. Well thought out statements. Good use of opinion and suggestion, but no "You should do this because I said" style of writing.

    Hopefully we can get this thread back on track.
    "By the power of Grayskull"
  • RacingSnailRacingSnail Member Posts: 7 ■□□□□□□□□□
    It's incredible when you consider how much students pay for classes.

    You forgot, some of them aren't paying for it.

    In many cases though, just having the slip of paper is true. Employers don't place a lot of value on superior GPA except in certain fields, and if you know the *right* people, there are even ways around that. For some people, that is just a green light to do the minimum, as short-sighted ultimately as that may be.
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  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,947 Admin
    eMeS wrote: »
    Accreditation

    1. Every school hiding behind this "we're accredited" nonsense is dis-ingenious. Any school that wants to can achieve accreditation. Read about accreditation in the United States, it's really a mess and tells you very little about the quality of the school.
    However, attending an accredited school is necessary to help ensure that the units (CPEs, CEUs, academic credits) will transfer to other learning institutions when you need them. Don't short-change yourself by thinking you'll only ever need one degree. You may find years from now a new educational direction for yourself, and you'll need those prior earned units to help yourself get another degree.

    CHEA is the central accrediting body (in the USA) and the school you choose should be on their list of accredited institutions. Also check with the individual school you plan to attend to discover what other educational institutions have accepted their units. CHEA-accreditation doesn't mean that a school's units will automatically transfer anywhere.


    Great post, eMeS. icon_thumright.gif
  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    JDMurray wrote: »
    However, attending an accredited school is necessary to help ensure that the units (CPEs, CEUs, academic credits) will transfer to other learning institutions when you need them. Don't short-change yourself by thinking you'll only ever need one degree. You may find years from now a new educational direction for yourself, and you'll need those prior earned units to help yourself get another degree.

    CHEA is the central accrediting body (in the USA) and the school you choose should be on their list of accredited institutions. Also check with the individual school you plan to attend to discover what other educational institutions have accepted their units. CHEA-accreditation doesn't mean that a school's units will automatically transfer anywhere.


    Great post, eMeS. icon_thumright.gif

    Thanks, I appreciate it....and might I say that you have a rare ability to say alot using a few words...I wish I could do the same.

    I definitely don't propose that accreditation be ignored, but I do think the consumers in the US need a better method of judging schools.

    My problem with accreditation in the US is that currently the way it's structured it in no way guarantees controls or limitations on variance between schools (or only minimally does so). Two schools, accredited by the same body, could do things in vastly different ways and achieve vastly different results.

    Accreditation tends to be used as a "we're equivalent to others that are accredited because we are also accredited" circular argument. In fact, what determines the reputation of a school is not it's accreditation (that in many ways is an exercise in "check the box" type auditing), but often the money it attracts through various sources of funding and the "talent" that follows that money, as well as what the school's graduates went on to accomplish.

    MS
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,947 Admin
    eMeS wrote: »
    I definitely don't propose that accreditation be ignored, but I do think the consumers in the US need a better method of judging schools.
    Accreditation is only one of many factors that is used to judge if a school fits the educational goals of a prospective student. Attending a school based only on its accreditation would be like moving to someplace simply because it has a reputation for being a nice neighborhood. There are a lot of other factors that should be considered before choosing a place to live or attend school.
    eMeS wrote: »
    My problem with accreditation in the US is that currently the way it's structured it in no way guarantees controls or limitations on variance between schools (or only minimally does so). Two schools, accredited by the same body, could do things in vastly different ways and achieve vastly different results.
    Academic accreditation is not meant to be a restriction, which it what it would need to be if it enforced strict levels of "quality conformity" upon educational institutions. Schools need the ability to set their own standards for what is acceptable and compatible, and what is a necessary level of quality. No one standard can assure quality over of all types of schools; CHEA accreditation is only a baseline used by schools to self-regulate their own standards. This allows the flexibility that schools need to offer diversity in their educational programs.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Interesting conversation, I think the majority of the time debts are a bad idea. If you can find a way around taking a school loan then do it. The last thing a student fresh out of college needs is a debt. Especially with the economy the way it is. If can't find a good job right a way you could have a huge sum to deal with paying back. I personally just dealt with that decision and decided on not taking classes this fall at a state college in the area I am moving to because of the outrageous out of state tuition. The state charges double. Depending upon what I decide this may slow me down for a year, but that is better than being in debt up to my ears.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • raiedraied A+, Network+, ITILv3 Member Posts: 93 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I am working on my masters in Network Security at DePaul University online (BTW – online requires more work, discipline and self learning). Here’s a list of schools I have discovered that are also online:

    Online Masters Programs:
    1. DePaul University - Asynchronous class (classes are recorded).
    2. Carnegie Mellon (yes, the Carnegie Mellon) - Asynchronous class (classes are recorded).
    3. Lewis University
    4. Boston University
    5. Capella University
    6. Dakota State University
    7. SANS Institute
    8. Nova Southeastern University
    9. Norwich University
    10. Capital University
  • RiskblingRiskbling Member Posts: 36 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Interesting conversation, I think the majority of the time debts are a bad idea. If you can find a way around taking a school loan then do it. The last thing a student fresh out of college needs is a debt. Especially with the economy the way it is. If can't find a good job right a way you could have a huge sum to deal with paying back. I personally just dealt with that decision and decided on not taking classes this fall at a state college in the area I am moving to because of the outrageous out of state tuition. The state charges double. Depending upon what I decide this may slow me down for a year, but that is better than being in debt up to my ears.

    Check out a local community college and knock out your basic requirements. I am sure you will save money even if you qualified for in-state tuition. Community colleges that reside in the same area as the school transfer very well. icon_thumright.gif
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I am just finishing my AAS in Computer Networking Technology at my Community College actually Riskbling :)
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • mrhaun03mrhaun03 Member Posts: 359
    binarysoul wrote: »
    You said it yourself! I'm totally against doing an entire degree online no matter how much prestige one tries to attach to online education. The major disadvantage of online education is the nonexistence of motivation. Now try to complete university level courses in front of a PC all by yourself; unless I'm Einstein determined to work on next big discovery I wouldn't have too much motivation to study in front of a PC for four years. I'd rather be in a class and learn besides some hot ladies :) (there is one advantage).

    But that's me, hey, but if it makes you happy that's all it matters. Good luck.


    I completely and respectfully disagree. The hot ladies would be a distraction. Sitting in a room alone by my PC would allow me to focus more on my studies. The reason I want to go back to school is enough motivation for me. I'm not gonna pay all that money to mess around.
    Working on Linux+
  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    mrhaun03 wrote: »
    I completely and respectfully disagree. The hot ladies would be a distraction. Sitting in a room alone by my PC would allow me to focus more on my studies. The reason I want to go back to school is enough motivation for me. I'm not gonna pay all that money to mess around.

    I've seriously been considering going back to school just to meet women icon_lol.gif
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,947 Admin
    dynamik wrote: »
    I've seriously been considering going back to school just to meet women icon_lol.gif
    Pick a college that has an excellent registered nursing degree programs (BSRN/MSRN) and take science and humanities classes required by the programs. The quality of the scoopage is unbelievable. icon_cyclops_ani.gif
  • snadamsnadam Member Posts: 2,234 ■■■■□□□□□□
    dynamik wrote: »
    I've seriously been considering going back to school just to meet women icon_lol.gif


    ASU has some of the hottest women in the country. Hell, that's where my wife went!!! icon_thumright.gif
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  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    JDMurray wrote: »
    Pick a college that has an excellent registered nursing degree programs (BSRN/MSRN) and take science and humanities classes required by the programs. The quality of the scoopage is unbelievable. icon_cyclops_ani.gif

    This has me laughing at my experience this morning! I had the funny experience of taking my certification at college meant mainly for nurses. Now I know half of you wondering why on earth did I choose this for my testing site. Well, I thought I was going to main campus of Davenport University that is well known in Michigan for their technology degrees. I wanted to see it for myself. Boy was I an idiot! It turned out that the site I chose was a satellite of the main campus icon_rolleyes.gif I am still baffled by their choice of campuses for cert testing.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,947 Admin
    I am still baffled by their choice of campuses for cert testing.
    So you think IT people are the only ones chasing after certs? Nurses have both certifications and licensing to worry about. If nursing and health care professionals don't keep up on their certs they can't work. A testing center at a nursing college is almost a necessary thing.

    You will also find testing centers at aviation schools for the same reason. Years ago I took several cert exams a testing center that was on the roof of a three story building near an airport. To get to the front door, you needed to walk around the helipad that occupied most of the roof. Twice I had to wait to get into the testing center because helicopters were taking off or landing. It was pretty cool, actually.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I'll bet, I guess I forgot about Nursing certs. Everyone I ran into on the way was chasing Microsoft.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • suzanemillersuzanemiller Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    As far as nursing courses are concerned, one can go for bachelor’s degree in nursing from universities like Kaplan University, Walden University, and Benedictine University and further you can pursue for masters in the same domain.
  • veritas_libertasveritas_libertas CISSP, GIAC x5, CompTIA x5 Greenville, SC USAMember Posts: 5,735 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Western Governors has nursing as well. Wow, this topic is getting off topic but interesting.
    Currently working on: Linux and Python
  • suzanemillersuzanemiller Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    and knowledgeable as well :)
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