so...what did CISSP do for your career?

chickenlicken09chickenlicken09 Senior MemberPosts: 513Member ■■■□□□□□□□
Hey,

So as the title says, did the cissp cert help your career much? This is mainly for the guys here who had little to no experience in infosec before geting the cert. Im curious to see how it helped e.g got an interview, got you onto the info sec path, pay rise etc. How did you start and where you are now.

Comments

  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,832Mod Mod
    Well, I'm an IT veteran but will tell you one thing. I recently migrated to a 100% Security job. During my search I found that the CISSP was either required or "highly recommended" for over 80% of the positions I looked at. Of course this may vary per region but at least gives you an idea.
  • H3||scr3amH3||scr3am Posts: 564Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Well I got my CISSP after I lost my job in a restructuring, I had the experience and was working towards it while i was working there, but I had a lot more time to focus on studying when I was without a job. As cyberguypr mentioned, lots of postings have it listed as a requirement or valuable assett to have. So far perhaps it's gotten me a few interviews, but I'm finding it's not opening the doors that I want it to so far. I'm still hopeful to get back into the security sector, but I'm also now looking at IT/Desktop support roles as well.

    Overall, I think it's a great certification to have and list with your name, and it is highly desired in the industry. But I feel it doesn't hold the value it once did, I'm seeing lots of listings looking for the GSEC and other SANS certs aswell, also the ISACA certifications too (CISM/CISA) etc. I'd say it held more weight a few years ago when the market wasn't so saturated with them, and when it was harder to come by in a pool of applicants.
  • emerald_octaneemerald_octane Posts: 613Member
    My callback rate is 90% post CISSP, salary nearly doubled.

    The thing about this particular cert is that there are alot of folks who try to make dubious attempts to get it on their resumes, using terms such as "CISSP Trained" or "Studied CISSP", or my absoulte favorite, "CISSP (In progress)". No folks, not an associate of (ISC)^2, i'm talking someone who just started studying the CBK that week. So it's very refreshing to find someone who is legitimately certified.
    It's highly likely that in a stack of 20 resumes with "CISSP" as a keyword, only 2 or 3 are certified. I wouldn't believe it if I hadn't seen it myself.
  • philz1982philz1982 Posts: 978Member
    Nothing yet just questions and folks at work calling me the cyber security guy...
  • jvrlopezjvrlopez Posts: 911Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    After getting my CISSP and looking around for jobs, the responsibility of those openings I received inquiries for was higher than before. The pay was also higher. I stayed at my old job when they gave me a raise. I also get more leads on my Linkedin now than before.
    And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high. ~Ayrton Senna
  • chickenlicken09chickenlicken09 Senior Member Posts: 513Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    philz1982 wrote: »
    Nothing yet just questions and folks at work calling me the cyber security guy...

    Do you intend on using it.
  • xenodamusxenodamus Posts: 758Member
    Initially, I took the CISSP to be compliant in a DoD environment where I worked as a Network Engineer. After passing and reflecting on how freakin hard the exam was...I decided to keep it current.

    I get calls and emails from recruiters regularly, looking for either:
    - Security guys (which I'm not really at this point)
    - Server/Network guys in government environments (requiring CISSP)

    If you have any infrastructure experience (servers, network, virtualization, storage, etc.) the CISSP will open up a ton of work in shops that REQUIRE it. Sometimes employers are willing to fudge on the experience requirements if they can find a CISSP who is clearable and has *some* of the required knowledge.
    CISSP | CCNA:R&S/Security | MCSA 2003 | A+ S+ | VCP6-DTM | CCA-V CCP-V
  • EasyPeezyEasyPeezy Posts: 111Member
    CISSP is certainly a door opener... I am a seasoned security professional and worked for one of the largest IT company for 15 years. I had a spate of bad managers, called their bluff and left the company. Having CISSP on my resume means at least I get noticed by prospective employers as well as the confidence that I could do anything in security... My previous company is desperate to have me back on double salary, but I am having none of it.
  • chickenlicken09chickenlicken09 Senior Member Posts: 513Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    xenodamus wrote: »
    Initially, I took the CISSP to be compliant in a DoD environment where I worked as a Network Engineer. After passing and reflecting on how freakin hard the exam was...I decided to keep it current.

    I get calls and emails from recruiters regularly, looking for either:
    - Security guys (which I'm not really at this point)
    - Server/Network guys in government environments (requiring CISSP)

    If you have any infrastructure experience (servers, network, virtualization, storage, etc.) the CISSP will open up a ton of work in shops that REQUIRE it. Sometimes employers are willing to fudge on the experience requirements if they can find a CISSP who is clearable and has *some* of the required knowledge.

    Interesting, i have several years experience with servers, network and virtualization. Looking for a change of direction and heading down the grc route. Hopefully the cissp will open doors for me.
  • chickenlicken09chickenlicken09 Senior Member Posts: 513Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    EasyPeezy wrote: »
    CISSP is certainly a door opener... I am a seasoned security professional and worked for one of the largest IT company for 15 years. I had a spate of bad managers, called their bluff and left the company. Having CISSP on my resume means at least I get noticed by prospective employers as well as the confidence that I could do anything in security... My previous company is desperate to have me back on double salary, but I am having none of it.


    good to hear, actually i had been looking on linked in using the cissp keyword and it seems there are a few positions alright, mainly london. I dont have any ties so could follow wherever doors open i guess. I also looked at cissp roles in edinburgh and bristol, both supposed to be nice cities.
  • chickenlicken09chickenlicken09 Senior Member Posts: 513Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Heres a role and a company i would love to get in with

    https://fidelity.taleo.net/careersection/10140/jobdetail.ftl?job=1412651&src=JB-10843

    The 5-7 years business experience i would prob struggle with, i wonder how important it is to really have this! I have no business background so not sure if that will hamper me much but i have 5 years in support/network admin roles.
  • EasyPeezyEasyPeezy Posts: 111Member
    eddo1 wrote: »
    Heres a role and a company i would love to get in with

    https://fidelity.taleo.net/careersection/10140/jobdetail.ftl?job=1412651&src=JB-10843

    The 5-7 years business experience i would prob struggle with, i wonder how important it is to really have this! I have no business background so not sure if that will hamper me much but i have 5 years in support/network admin roles.


    Never let job requirements put you off a job. Some requirements are essential whilst others are good to have. You could easily make a good case for yourself at the interview stage..
  • chickenlicken09chickenlicken09 Senior Member Posts: 513Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    EasyPeezy wrote: »
    Never let job requirements put you off a job. Some requirements are essential whilst others are good to have. You could easily make a good case for yourself at the interview stage..

    Yeah very true, what area are you in yourself? I think London would be a good spot to test out the cissp.
  • infosevninfosevn Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I dont know, how's other cissp , but cissp of my company , now he is my manager , everyday his task is foward all emial that have words " Security " to me and said " You view and find how to resolve it ". So now i am trying passed cissp the same him :D
  • ExpectExpect Posts: 251Member
    Not much, yet :)

    still in the same job and haven't looked for new a job since, though several companies contacted me since I listed in on Linkedin (not sure if it's related to it or not though.) like Facebook and Red Hat.
  • CyberscumCyberscum Posts: 795Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    This is the only cert I will renew. For some strange reason this cert holds alot of weight. I got offered a pretty sweet gig and took it after the exam.

    If you are debating on getting it, I say it is a MUST for a security dude.
  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Posts: 2,799Mod Mod
    After passing the CISSP in September last year, and getting my endorsement done in October, I was blown up with emails and phone calls, to the point I had to grabe a notepad and create a log to keep track of my contacts and when and what I spoke to recruiters about. I was able to land a nice role that was a big step up at a nice increase in salary at the beginning of this year. I then made another jump to a nice position with a decent bump in pay. So in a years time I have made two jumps up in role and increased my pay 44%. Now I will say that the CISSP isn't a magic bullet, but it will open the doors to contacts and interviews, the rest is up to you. Also to note the CISSP was listed as a requirement in both jobs I got and was called out by the management during the interviews.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, eJPT, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CSAA, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: Python, OSCP Prep
    Next Up:​ OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (Python), Bash Scripting, Virtual Hacking Lab Coursework
  • TheProfezzorTheProfezzor Posts: 204Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    My callback rate is 90% post CISSP, salary nearly doubled.

    The thing about this particular cert is that there are alot of folks who try to make dubious attempts to get it on their resumes, using terms such as "CISSP Trained" or "Studied CISSP", or my absoulte favorite, "CISSP (In progress)". No folks, not an associate of (ISC)^2, i'm talking someone who just started studying the CBK that week. So it's very refreshing to find someone who is legitimately certified.
    It's highly likely that in a stack of 20 resumes with "CISSP" as a keyword, only 2 or 3 are certified. I wouldn't believe it if I hadn't seen it myself.

    I can feel you, my friend. I have had a number of interviews in my country and all of the time, recruiters have asked me. "Did you write CISSP down in your resume, just because you are working on it or, are you really certified?". I sometimes feel offended by this icon_sad.gif
    OSCP: Loading . . .
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,442Admin Admin
    recruiters have asked me. "Did you write CISSP down in your resume, just because you are working on it or, are you really certified?"
    This is why you should include your (ISC)2 membership number on your resume so the recruiters can verify your certification for themselves.
  • impelseimpelse Posts: 1,227Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Good to know, that was the question I had, if I have to include my membership number.
    Blog: learn-security.net

    Computer Support Houston Area: thehost1.com
  • JamesITJamesIT Posts: 11Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    JDMurray wrote: »
    This is why you should include your (ISC)2 membership number on your resume so the recruiters can verify your certification for themselves.


    Would you reccomend putting membership numbers for all security certifications ect on resume? Or just for CISSP?
    2014 Cert Goals: eCCPT (DONE), BSc Hons Ethical Hacking (In Progress)
    2015 Cert Goals: CompTIA Security+ (Done), DVLA Driving License, Security Tube Python Expert
  • GoodBishopGoodBishop Posts: 359Member
    Doubled my salary.
  • impelseimpelse Posts: 1,227Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    GoodBishop wrote: »
    Doubled my salary.

    I can perceive you guys changed company to get the salary increase, right ?
    Blog: learn-security.net

    Computer Support Houston Area: thehost1.com
  • broli720broli720 Posts: 394Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Hasn't really done much for me. I was already making a comfortable amount and executed many projects successfully. Maybe in the eyes of the industry it served as validation, but who knows. Maybe this upcoming performance review I'll see the benefits of it and my masters.
  • broli720broli720 Posts: 394Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    JamesIT wrote: »
    Would you reccomend putting membership numbers for all security certifications ect on resume? Or just for CISSP?

    I only have that information on my linkedin. I like to keep my resume as clean as possible and they can validate all of that when they do their background checks.
  • richymartinrichymartin Posts: 28Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    It got me interviews, after that its down to you to charm your way in the front door.
  • malcolmcatmalcolmcat Posts: 12Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I had 5.5 years of Information Security experience (Access Control and Security Operations) but have been out of the field for a while. Figured if I wanted to get back in then I needed to get serious and pass the CISSP exam to help my cause. Passed the exam in July 2014 and was officially licensed in September and started job hunting. Got lots of recruiters contacting me but not a lot good fits. Started getting interviews but didn't land anything. Just this month tried a different approach and am pleased to announced that I have received a job offer for a Cyber Security position. So the certification did help me land a new job.
  • Realist2001Realist2001 Posts: 15Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I took the test in September, endorsed in October. Got a job offer in another city and relocated this month. This will be my 3rd week there.

    I will definitely say it helped. When the recruiter called to inquire about the position, he seemed very passive, like it was just a routine call. He pulled an old resume that didn't have my cissp cert on it. When I told him I had it, I could tell it peaked his interested. Long story short, got the interview and got the job.

    It's weird because a lot of the people I work with are fairly new like I am and I'm one of the few, if not the only, who have it outside of upper management. My salary is modest mainly because I currently lack the experience but everyday I have a co-worker (when they find out I have it) either asking why am I here and not somewhere else making more or wanting to know the steps I did to pass it. To question #1. I tell them once I get some experience, I'm out because I'm only making about 5k mute than my computer support job I left. I just mainly took the job to get my foot in the door.
  • dctgibsondctgibson Posts: 38Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    @malcolmcat, I'm glad you were able to get at new position in Cyber Security. You mentioned that you "tried a different approach.." Can you give us a little more insight into that approach? Appreciate it....
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