MCSA, CCNA, Linux+ Which One First?

williadatechwilliadatech Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi Everyone,

Out of a job in two days after 12 years of service, spent last 8 years as application system admin. I have no certs just on the job training. Which cert should I go for?
MCSA
CCNA
Linux+
?
Have supported: WebSphere/windows/AIX and highly customized applications for the health Sector.

ideally would like to move in an infra role.

Any thoughts?

Cheers

Comments

  • Dakinggamer87Dakinggamer87 Gaming Tech Expert Silicon Valley, CAPosts: 4,001Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    It depends on what you want to support whether it's in servers/networking. If you want to move into networking I would recommend the CCNA. If it's servers/systems administration then Linux+ or MCSA depending on whether you want to specialize in Windows or Linux. ;)
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  • techfiendtechfiend Posts: 1,481Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Seems like you plan on getting all 3. Since you have windows experience the MCSA would probably benefit you the most currently. Though with daily windows server experience I found the MCSA more difficult than the CCNA to obtain. If I had to rate difficulty individual tests from easiest to most difficult: ICND1 > 74-409 > 74-410 > ICND2 > 70-411. I replaced the common 70-412 that appeared to be very difficult judging by the study with the much easier and more interesting 74-409. With MCSA once you pass one test you get a pretty highly regarded MCP certification which means a lot more than CCENT in most places.
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  • williadatechwilliadatech Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Wow, you have a lot of Certs, well done!
    I'm halfway through CBT Nuggets Linux+, but I figure I might be able to nail 70-410 over a couple of weeks while I'm off work looking for a new role. But then I did read on CCNA in60days that the CCNA exams are going to change early next year.
    The job market in Wellington NZ is kind of small and has alot of government departments that are start to go to a central IAAS.

    For the last few years I've been 70% win and 30% UNIX.

    Thanks for you comment

    Cheers :)
  • williadatechwilliadatech Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    It depends on what you want to support whether it's in servers/networking. If you want to move into networking I would recommend the CCNA. If it's servers/systems administration then Linux+ or MCSA depending on whether you want to specialize in Windows or Linux. ;)

    I've always done both but want to try to follow a path where there will always be work, and have skills that are most in demand.

    Thanks for take the time to comment it's really appreciated

    Cheers :D
  • DeathmageDeathmage Posts: 2,496Banned
    Lookup Kiwiplan, they do allot of software development and are linux-based. CentOS to be exact. They make Corrugation software. :)

    they have a big office in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Contact | Kiwiplan
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    How broad is your experience in Windows? MCSA is aimed at 1+ year of experience in a medium (200 seats, multi site) environment. If you've used most of the services, have good AD and Group Policy, then it shouldn't be too hard. Certainly 90 days is doable, although I'd say a minimum of 3 days per exam. If you were reasonable senior, doing planning/design/engineering/architecting, then MCSE might be a good goal.

    How much Linux do you have? The Linux+ covers a fair bit of Linux specific stuff, so the AIX won't be enough. Linux+ is fairly entry level, if you have decent Linux hands on, you could probably get up to speed in a couple of weeks. RHCE is the go to Linux certification. I /think/ there might even be an RHCE for Unix admins course.

    How much network experience and Cisco hands on? Configured routers, switches? Troubleshooting? If it's just basic, then CCNA is a bit of a slog, probably a couple of months.

    What I'd recommend is do the easiest stuff first.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • Chev ChelliosChev Chellios Posts: 341Member
    I would say go for Linux + and MCSA first then the CCNA but the job market you are in may differ to here- I see loads more jobs asking for MCSA than CCNA where I am in the UK. I'm going through the CCNA material as a learning journey as never really been able to get much hands on at work with routers but as others say play to your strengths and interests! Good luck whichever way you approach it!
  • williadatechwilliadatech Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Deathmage wrote: »
    Lookup Kiwiplan, they do allot of software development and are linux-based. CentOS to be exact. They make Corrugation software. :)

    they have a big office in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Contact | Kiwiplan

    Cheers will do
  • williadatechwilliadatech Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    OctalDump wrote: »
    How broad is your experience in Windows? MCSA is aimed at 1+ year of experience in a medium (200 seats, multi site) environment. If you've used most of the services, have good AD and Group Policy, then it shouldn't be too hard. Certainly 90 days is doable, although I'd say a minimum of 3 days per exam. If you were reasonable senior, doing planning/design/engineering/architecting, then MCSE might be a good goal.

    How much Linux do you have? The Linux+ covers a fair bit of Linux specific stuff, so the AIX won't be enough. Linux+ is fairly entry level, if you have decent Linux hands on, you could probably get up to speed in a couple of weeks. RHCE is the go to Linux certification. I /think/ there might even be an RHCE for Unix admins course.

    How much network experience and Cisco hands on? Configured routers, switches? Troubleshooting? If it's just basic, then CCNA is a bit of a slog, probably a couple of months.

    What I'd recommend is do the easiest stuff first.

    Many Thanks for you detailed reply OctalDump icon_thumright.gif

    Broad, 8 years supporting highly customized health sector applications on windows 2003 servers, AIX LPARS with various ibm middle ware.
    Basic to intermediate skills in both.

    As for Cisco have never really had go. Although I did get this second hand kit to have a go with at some stage:

    2 x Cisco routers 1700
    Catalyst 2900 XL

    So nil I guess.

    So which would you say is the easiest?

    Cheers
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    Based on what you say, I'd go with Windows. The MCSA is 3 exams. One option is MCSA Server 2008 and a delta exam to get MCSA Server 2012. If you have only Windows 2003, then it'll be some work. MS tend to put in a few questions that rely on knowledge of version specific features eg Which forest functional level is required for Windows 2008 RODCs? You have a network with 2003 and 2008 DC, you add two new 2008r2. What do you need to do to promote 2008r2 servers to Domain Controllers? 2008 is probably an easier transition from 2003, since it isn't as PowerShell heavy as the 2012 exams.

    Probably with MCSA Server, you'll find the higher level stuff (eg designing DNS, backup strategy, AD) a bit easier since it is a little less technically centred.

    You'd likely be able to get Linux+ done fairly quickly, but after that I'd recommend aiming for something like RHCE, which will take a fair bit longer.
    RHCE has quite a few objectives, and you need to be pretty confident in installing/configuring a broad range of features. The classroom courses from Red Hat are very good for preparing for the exam, but are expensive (about 5k).

    CCNA might be challenging if you are coming from nearly nothing. It is heavy on Cisco specifics, eg how to configure NAT from ios, which commands would you use to troubleshoot a RIPv2 routing problem etc. It is certainly worthwhile, though and if you don't have much networking it really opens up your eyes to the whole world of networking. The Cisco Academy courses are excellent, although pricing (hundreds to thousands) and timing varies a lot (a couple of weeks to a year). Possibly you might find a local polytechnic offering the course for not too much in a reasonable time frame. Otherwise they also have good self study guides for beginners.

    So, wander over to https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-nz/mcsa-certification.aspx and have a read through the exam objectives. Take a look at https://certification.comptia.org/certifications/linux and Red Hat Certification | Red Hat and then check out Cisco https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/community/certifications
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • williadatechwilliadatech Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I would say go for Linux + and MCSA first then the CCNA but the job market you are in may differ to here- I see loads more jobs asking for MCSA than CCNA where I am in the UK. I'm going through the CCNA material as a learning journey as never really been able to get much hands on at work with routers but as others say play to your strengths and interests! Good luck whichever way you approach it!

    Many thanks for your comments Chev. I'm thinking "

    Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012"

    Might be the go first.

    Cheers

  • Chev ChelliosChev Chellios Posts: 341Member
    Good call mate, go and smash it!
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