General Advice

miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi, I am currently in my senior year in Bachelor in Computer Science and Economics.
- working as a part-time Computer Technician, paid $10 hourly.
- no internship experience.
- no certifications.

I am thinking of going into Masters in Computer Science, and/or do some certifications like MSCE. Do you think it is necessary to do MSCE, plus with masters in comp science?

Thanks.

Comments

  • Ricka182Ricka182 Posts: 3,359Member
    A masters certainly won't hold you down in any field, especially IT; but when it comes to practical hands on experience, there is nothing more valuable than said experience. I would hold off on the Masters, and start working on your certifications, depending on which way you go in IT. If you don't plan to be in with Systems Administration and the like, an MCSE will do you no good, not to mention it's not a beginner cert, and may not look good without, said experience. Any idea what you want to do, now and in the future?
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Well, I certainly would not go in programming. Actually, the reason I think of doing a masters is because I am offered a sponsorship to do that. If I would do that, I am going into computer networks as my specialization. Do you know what a masters in computer networks would do for me?

    I have been trying to get experience through internship. But, did not succeed, plus I prefer keeping my current part-time job.

    i would want to be in network technology field, jobs such as network administrator.

    Since MCSE would be not an beginner's cert, do you know what would?
    Thanks.
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Posts: 3,359Member
    For Network starters, I would look at Comptias' Network+, which is the core basics for Networking. Ciscos' CCNA/NP would be the next level. If you're getting a sponsor offer for your Masters, that changes things, as I'm sure it's better to have a free masters, than one you had to pay for......
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the advice. I guess I will try Network+ next.
  • milliampmilliamp Posts: 135Member
    I was going to say the same thing as Ricka182, but he beat me to it.

    With networking Cisco certs set the standard. Also, the i-net+ is another easy exam that covers basic internet technologies.
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Posts: 3,359Member
    miclch wrote:
    Thanks for the advice. I guess I will try Network+ next.
    I would highly recco the Technotes SE from this site. Thye are a great reference, with loads of good info. They make a great partner with a full guide such as Mike Myers AIO or Sybex.
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks again, guys
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Posts: 3,359Member
    We're here to help... :)
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • jaeusmjaeusm Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    - no internship experience.

    If you go for your masters, do yourself a favor and start getting internships during your summers. Seriously, they are almost as important as the degree itself. You can learn more in one summer internship than in two years of schooling. I was in school for 9 years and was fortunate enough to get an internship every summer. I can say with certainty that internships will greatly enhance your knowledge as well as your chances of getting a good job when you graduate. You may also be able to get a job at the company that gave you an internship. The bottom line is that any professional experience is vital. If you're in a university, understand that your summers should be spent wisely.

    Also, if you're not interested in software development, then don't waste your time in computer science -- especially at the graduate level. Networking was my area of interest, but I still earned my MS in computer science. However, I've spent a lot of time doing network programming, which I really enjoy. I find it more fascinating than just learning how to maintain and work with networks. Maybe you would too.
  • miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I have been thinking so much of doing an internship as well. But, I failed in one of those chances. Plus, my part-time work does not allow me to take any internship.
    Thanks. I understand how vital an internship is.
  • SlowhandSlowhand Questionably Benevolent Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    One important thing to do, as well. Check out the job listings in your area, for the type of field you're looking to enter. Find out if employers are asking for MCSE, CCNA, etc. . . I know from experience that, sometimes, they ask for the moon.

    I currently live in the San Francisco area, and out here, you're expected to know everything and have enough experience for ten admins/developers/engineers. You'd be shocked at how many jobs go something like this:

    Experience: "At least 5-7 years" in just about every aspect of IT. Usually in both administrator/networking experience and software development experience. (Including management, they always want management experience. . . bastards.)
    Education: "Bachelors in CS, Math, or related field. (Masters strongly preferred.)"
    And then they usually ramble through MCSE, CCNA, CISSP, and the like. Mind you, this is for just about every tech job that pays over $30,000, regardless if it's for a software development position or administrator status. Sometimes I get the feeling this is the evil minions of HR just throwing stuff out there, without a clue as to what any of it means. But, unfortunately, they're the ones hiring you.


    On the same coin, I've checked out the market in Indianapolis, where someone I know lives. Out there, I've seen offerings for senior level positions based on either a degree or even a single advanced cert, (like CCNA or MCSE, not A+ or Net+,) with very decent salaries. It's all about location, perspective, and finding the right job at the right time.


    For some info on the job market in your area, check out local job searches, as well as something like (urk) Monster.com or, better yet, Dice.com. Just do a search in your town, or by your area code, and you'll get an idea of what you're up against. Dice.com can be a little overwhelming, as far as the kinds of jobs they're looking for and the experience they ask for, whereas local employers might be a bit more forgiving, but you'll definately get an idea of where the bar is set for the higher-paying jobs and the more interesting careers.

    Good luck with all your studying, I'll hopefully be in your shoes not too long from now.

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  • miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the advice. Yeah, luck certainly plays a part in getting a job. It includes location, timing...
    Agree with all those requirements. i mean, seriously, who would easily fit all those requirements.
    i guess at the end, it is better to have more certifications since it's the more the better.
  • keatronkeatron Posts: 1,208Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    "Luck is the meeting of preparation and opportunity"

    Be dilligent in preparing yourself for a career in this field (even when it seems there's not an interview anywhere in sight), and you will hit that cross road where preperation and opportunity meet. If you're prepared, you probably won't have to look back again. If you're not prepared, you'll be kicking yourself in the arse for years to come about the "big opportunity I missed because I didn't do this one little thing to prepare myself".

    So don't look at it as luck, just look at it as the times when your preparation meets with the opportunity you've been looking for.
  • miclchmiclch Posts: 42Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    keatron wrote:
    "Luck is the meeting of preparation and opportunity"
    Great quote and advice. Thanks.
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