CCNP Blueprint has been updated?

I was looking around the INE website and noticed that they were coming out with a new ccnp bootcamp so I asked them why and that I thought the current series was suitable to pass. They said Cisco updated the CCNP blueprint and the bootcamp will reflect that. Has anyone else heard of the update?

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    I haven't heard of any changes. Maybe they are adjusting it to the new percentage based topics Cisco put out?
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • fredrikjjfredrikjj Member Posts: 879
    They announced a 10 day bootcamp, but it's still the same list of topics as the current NP. Personally I think that they put too much focus on BGP, and not enough on IPv6. The key to passing Route is to be able to to do the relatively easy IPv6 topics in your sleep since you've then secured an easy 15%.
  • aaron0011aaron0011 Member Posts: 330
    fredrikjj wrote: »
    They announced a 10 day bootcamp, but it's still the same list of topics as the current NP. Personally I think that they put too much focus on BGP, and not enough on IPv6. The key to passing Route is to be able to to do the relatively easy IPv6 topics in your sleep since you've then secured an easy 15%.

    It should be updated to get rid of all the frame relay, non-broadcast, and using RIP in redistribution examples crap. ROUTE is taking me forever because so much of the material seems outdated.

    I hope I see a lot of GRE when it's time to sit for the exam. Potentially late June for my first attempt.
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Member Posts: 1,104
    aaron0011 wrote: »
    It should be updated to get rid of all the frame relay, non-broadcast, and using RIP in redistribution examples crap. ROUTE is taking me forever because so much of the material seems outdated.

    I hope I see a lot of GRE when it's time to sit for the exam. Potentially late June for my first attempt.

    Come on, who doesn't want to learn about crap you will never use/see? lol You just have to know where to skip over the "fluff" and there is tons of it through Cisco materials.
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    Whilst Frame-Relay is indeed very much out of date now - your learning of it and all what comes with it (OSPF Network types, I'm looking at you) will not be a waste.

    DMVPN anyone... it's a non-broadcast media too.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    gorebrush wrote: »
    DMVPN anyone... it's a non-broadcast media too.

    Very true :) +1 for you
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • fredrikjjfredrikjj Member Posts: 879
    aaron0011 wrote: »
    non-broadcast

    OSPF non-broadcast and point-to-multipoint non-broadcast are relevant even if your layer 2 supports multicast because it allows you to set per neighbor cost on multipoint interfaces with multiple neighbors. For example, if you have an Ethernet segment with 3 routers where two of them are 1 Gbps and one is 100 Mbps. If total cost to some destination is the same otherwise, you could end up with a scenario where you are load sharing between a gigabit and a 100 mbit link. This is obviously not desirable. Using non-broadcast/p2m non-broadcast allows you to set per neighbor cost under the OSPF router process to solve this problem.
Sign In or Register to comment.