How can i use LinkedIn to my advantage?

Techguru365Techguru365 Member Posts: 131 ■■■□□□□□□□
I have been thinking about reaching out to HR managers on LinkedIn. Firstly, would that be a good idea and secondly, what would be an effective icebreaker?

Comments

  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,781 Mod
    You network with your friends. There are recruiters on there..
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • Techguru365Techguru365 Member Posts: 131 ■■■□□□□□□□
    So, do you think shooting off an email to a HR manager would be a bad idea?
  • pinkydapimppinkydapimp Member Posts: 732 ■■■■■□□□□□
    if you want to use linked in well, network with people. When i say network, join technology groups, interact with people, discuss current topics on your page and in groups, help people solve problems. That will help increase your network and your reputation. You could reach out to an HR manager, but it might be better to have a friend introduce you if they are connected to them(thats the benefit of a large linkedin network).
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    I wouldn't hit up HR managers personally. Maybe some hiring managers if you know some.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • BradleyHUBradleyHU Member Posts: 918 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I wouldn't hit up HR managers personally. Maybe some hiring managers if you know some.

    ++agree with this
    Link Me
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  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Mod Posts: 2,832 Mod
    I used LinkedIn to directly contact certain HR recruiters and other key personnel at firms that I was targeting. I actually connected with the CIO of a large financial firm and after several messages back and forth over some time he got me an interview for a IAM management position I was after. However the hiring manager for that position was dragging his feet and lost out as I accepted my current position. I also contacted an HR manager at a managed security services provider who now reaches out to me with opportunities. So it is valuable if you use it to target people in certain positions. However do not use the generic connect message. Actually type out a little bit of a message introducing yourself, mention how you think their company would be a great place to work and/or you're targeting a certain position.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, eJPT, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CSAA, AWS CCP, OCI Foundations Associate, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
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  • ande0255ande0255 Banned Posts: 1,178
    My first and foremost advice that I've posted elsewhere in regards to linkedin, would be to meet with local recruiters and get a business card, or simply call the local IT recruiter shops and ask for a name or two. Connect with them on linkedin, then go to their profile, and send all of their connections invites to connect.

    Also look for groups in area's of IT you are interested in, and join as many as possible, as I often see job postings from these types of groups. Also connecting with the people in these specialized groups directly would be a good networking move as well, even if you don't know them, it's always worth having as many connections as possible.
  • Techguru365Techguru365 Member Posts: 131 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks guys! Been job hunting for months now, and cant even get the help desk and computer operator 1 jobs that I have applied for.I am basically just scrambling for ideas at the moment.
  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Mod Posts: 2,832 Mod
    Thanks guys! Been job hunting for months now, and cant even get the help desk and computer operator 1 jobs that I have applied for.I am basically just scrambling for ideas at the moment.

    To be honest, I think the CompTIA certs are worthless and not worth the money. You'd be better served getting the CCNA instead of the Network+. I do recommend getting the books and studying the material, but save the money on the cert and go for others. Also getting the MCSA would be a good start as well. I know the CCNA and MCSA are not vendor neutral, but they are two of the more well known, get a ton more respect than Network+ and A+, and most businesses use Microsoft products anyways.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, eJPT, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CSAA, AWS CCP, OCI Foundations Associate, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: Python, OSCP Prep
    Next Up:​ OSCP
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  • Techguru365Techguru365 Member Posts: 131 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I am starting to get that feeling. Was studying to go for the Sec+ but not so sure anymore. Strange thing is, even jobs that list A+ as a requirement, I still cant even get a follow up or interview.
  • pinkydapimppinkydapimp Member Posts: 732 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I am starting to get that feeling. Was studying to go for the Sec+ but not so sure anymore. Strange thing is, even jobs that list A+ as a requirement, I still cant even get a follow up or interview.

    Check your resume then. Its likely the issue.
  • adam220891adam220891 Member Posts: 164 ■■■□□□□□□□
    CompTIA isn't worthless, but not gold either.

    I have found their tests to expose me to information/terms that I otherwise would not be familiar with. On many occasions I have heard people mention these or have come across the technologies discussed, and it was nice to have an idea what they were and how they worked. You won't be an expert on anything, but it just may save you from going 'huh?' when talking to an interviewer or colleague.

    I believe it helped me get a job, so it's easy for me to justify. I would expect an individual to eventually continue on to more specific/tougher exams in order to show growth, though.
  • eLseLs Member Posts: 74 ■■□□□□□□□□
    The knowledge from the Trio A/N/Sec+ tests is a good thing for all IT professionals and starting out is a must have. Now the expense in paying for the test is another thing BUT big BUT a lot of hiring companies or job posts list the certification being needed or recommended which means your resume may just be thrown out if you do not list it in the resume.

    As an entry level tech starting out looking for experience/first IT job it is better to have it then not have it at all. If your experienced then it does not matter then.

    I got my CompTIA certifications free so it was a win/win for me LOL.
    Bachelor of Science: Computer Information Systems
    2014 Goals: Solarwinds Certified Professional (SCP), Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician (CCENT) and Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA).
  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Mod Posts: 2,832 Mod
    adam220891 wrote: »
    I have found their tests to expose me to information/terms that I otherwise would not be familiar with

    That's why I said it's good to get the books, absorb the material. But as far as the cost, and especially the cost to maintain. Not worth it at all. Youll get much more value, and more hits on the resume by having a CCNA/MCSA over a Network+/A+.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, eJPT, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CSAA, AWS CCP, OCI Foundations Associate, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: Python, OSCP Prep
    Next Up:​ OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (Python), Bash Scripting, Virtual Hacking Lab Coursework
  • adam220891adam220891 Member Posts: 164 ■■■□□□□□□□
    JoJoCal19 wrote: »
    That's why I said it's good to get the books, absorb the material. But as far as the cost, and especially the cost to maintain. Not worth it at all. Youll get much more value, and more hits on the resume by having a CCNA/MCSA over a Network+/A+.

    I don't disagree with that. With that said, someone with nothing can more quickly get a few lines on their resume with the CompTIA stuff and get the essential foundational knowledge they will need for the rest of their career.

    I was able to get the A+, N+, and MTA: Networking in under four months (granted I spent at least an hour a day studying). I had no job experience but I started my job four days after I graduated with my AAS in CST. Now, I've since gotten the CCENT and will be going for the CCNA, but it's taking far longer to get those and I wouldn't have had those on my resume in time for graduation - I believe it would have been a challenge to get a job with no certifications and no experience.

    If you're in an IT role or have the additional time required to get a CCNA or MCSA, by all means, skip the CompTIA stuff. But I don't regret getting them - but I will continue to progress past them because they are entry level and they do lack value compared to the Cisco and MS certs.

    I do agree though - the knowledge means more than the certification, but lines on the resume never hurt.
  • dubzerdubzer Member Posts: 13 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Look for the position(s) you're interested and I'm sure you'll find it in LinkedIn. A lot of recruiters btw which can be great if you don't know what type of position you should look for.
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