A 2960 switch does DHCP?

mikeybinecmikeybinec Senior MemberPosts: 482Member ■■■□□□□□□□
So, for ICND2, I have purchased three 2960s--for etherchannel. The one I received today, I had to clear out the running-config 'cuz it was password protected (and that's why I recommend that people buy some hardware, instead of doing just Packet tracer!)

So after I was able to get into the running-config, I noticed it had a dhcp pool config in it. I had no idea 2960s could do dhcp!

So my question for the gurus is why would a switch be used for dhcp instead of a router?

Thanks all
Cisco NetAcad Cuyamaca College
A.S. LAN Management 2010 Grossmont College
B.S. I.T. Management 2013 National University

Comments

  • spiderjerichospiderjericho Senior Member Mojave DesertPosts: 837Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Honestly, the classic DHCP is usually provided by a server. But it doesn't really matter. You could probably have a phone, tablet or whatever device acting like a DHCP server. It's not really taxing since it's just a client service. I've seen switches, firewalls, routers and APs act as DHCP servers.

    I've seen Unix/Linux and Windows boxes act as routers.
  • NicolaiBNicolaiB Posts: 2Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Like Spiderjericho says.. The classic DHCP in a business environment is usually provided by a DHCP server.. My best guess would be that its just a feature provided in the IOS.. Isn't it the same as saying why would you run eigrp or ospf on a L3 switch instead of using an actual router? There shoulden't really be a need to run DHCP on a router unless your network is too small to buy a server and setup a dhcp process on that.

    We only use DHCP on routers for shop chains.. We have a couple of customers who each has like 100-200 shops around the country. All the shops really need is basic access to the internet, internet connection for their credit card machines, wireless network and access to the main corporate servers. So what we did was to implement a basic Cisco 881W router in each shop. Basically its a router with a build in switch and build in seperate access point. So we accomodate all their needs in one box rather than having to implement a router, which leads further to a switch, which has an access point connected. On the router, and the build in AP we run DHCP process so that we dont need to place a like 100-200 dhcp servers around the shops.

    Thats about the only scenaria i find it usefull to use the IOS dhcp server, whether its on a router or on a switch.
  • JeanMJeanM Posts: 1,117Member
    What NicolaiB said. Once you get into bigger environments, there are dedicated servers doing specific tasks + redundancy of course. In a lab though, deff play with as much commands and scenarios as you can.
    2015 goals - ccna voice / vmware vcp.
  • mikeybinecmikeybinec Senior Member Posts: 482Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm looking at this from the uninformed point of view: A Layer 2 device is handing out IP addresses, but it is not the default gateway for all the hosts it is "serving". I'm looking for the design angle from the gurus.
    Cisco NetAcad Cuyamaca College
    A.S. LAN Management 2010 Grossmont College
    B.S. I.T. Management 2013 National University
  • JeanMJeanM Posts: 1,117Member
    mikeybinec wrote: »
    I'm looking at this from the uninformed point of view: A Layer 2 device is handing out IP addresses, but it is not the default gateway for all the hosts it is "serving". I'm looking for the design angle from the gurus.

    https://supportforums.cisco.com/discussion/9929261/2960-be-dhcp-server

    Catalyst 2960 and 2960-S Software Configuration Guide, 12.2(53)SE1 - Assigning the Switch IP Address and Default Gateway [Cisco Catalyst 2960 Series Switches] - Cisco
    2015 goals - ccna voice / vmware vcp.
  • RaisinRaisin Posts: 136Member
    I believe that switches have DHCP in order to allow access to the web configuration page on new switches. This can come in handy if you don't have a console cable.
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