SysPrep

jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
OK, can someone tell me how sysprep works and what it does? I don't seem to understand sysprep.

Does sysprep create an image that you burn to a cd?
Does sysprep strip the SID and then you have to remove your hard drive and install it into a disk duplicator to make copies of it?
When you run sysprep is the drive you run it on wiped out? icon_confused.gif:
Can sysprep be run on a local machine or in a workgroup or does it have to be run in a Domain Environment?
How do you run sysprep?
GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE

Comments

  • RTmarcRTmarc Member Posts: 1,082 ■■■□□□□□□□
    This quick and ugly of Sysprep:

    -Strips all machine-specific security information

    -Used when you are looking at a machine after you completely configure all settings and applications and think "you know, this is a really kick ass image. I sure wish the other machines around here had it!"

    -Can be used to on one machine or multiple. Workgroup, Domain, or stand alone machine.

    -Can be used as a restore disk. I have used it for my grandparents. They give me a call and say their machine is slowing down, I have them run a "restore disk" I created (with Sysprep) and in puts it back to a good point.
    --A sysprep image is nothing more than a restore disk that you get when you install a new computer.


    There is more to it -especially when you start working with answer files- but this is the quick and ugly.
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    After I run sysprep the drive is still usable - correct?
    so then after I run sysprep where is the image put so i can burn to the cd?
    What type of file does it burn? (ISO)

    No answer files yet. I have to get the plan attanded installation down first before I move on to answer files.

    thanks!!
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Sysprep is not an imaging tool, it used in conjunction with imaging utilities. Sysprep basically ensure that you don't end up with identical machines in terms of security IDs. I.o.w. SysPrep prepares the system for imaging. After you run it, you need to use a disk imaging utility (ghost, Ximage) to create an image or duplex the disk.
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    got that webmaster - but after you use sysprep where is the image that you copy to a cd/dvd stored? After you use sysprep to get the image ready to be copy and after you copy the image (where ever it is) do you have to re-format/image the machine you created the image from.

    I ran sysprep and the machine re-booted but I could not find the image to burn. The machien could not find any of my network connection or printers. Is the image that it boots to the image you need to burn?
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • shadown7shadown7 Member Posts: 529
    When your system reboots you can not let it load into Windows or you will have to run sysprep again.

    You need to have a boot disk that will load you into the imaging program of your choice. Once you boot into the imaging program you then can make a copy of the disk. You can either copy the image to DVD or a network drive.

    Once the image is done just reboot the machine and sysprep will let you setup the machine again (if you checked the "mini setup" check box).

    Sysprep does not destroy your computers setup. It just neuters it. icon_wink.gif
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    thansk guys - it's getting clearer.

    Are there detailed instructions on how to use sysprep anywhere?
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    jescab wrote:
    but after you use sysprep where is the image that you copy to a cd/dvd stored? After you use sysprep to get the image ready to be copy and after you copy the image (where ever it is) do you have to re-format/image the machine you created the image from.
    As I mentioned in my previous reply, sysprep is 'not' an imaging tool, it just prepares the contents on the disk for imaging. I does not create an image. After you run it, you need an imaging util (e.g. Ghost or Ximage) to create an image of the disk. You need to use that util without booting to Windows again as Shadown mentioned.

    icon_arrow.gifHow to Use Sysprep: An Introduction

    icon_arrow.gifHow to use the Sysprep tool to automate successful deployment of Windows XP

    I hope this helps!
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    webmaster - yes i know that sysprep is not an imaging tool and all it does is prepare the image to be cloned, as i said in my earlier post.

    Thanks for the info.
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    Just trying to help jescab ;)

    The part I quoted didn't show you understand sysprep doesn't create an image cause you were looking for location of the image. Anyway, if you don't have a disk imaging tool that allows you to boot from a floppy, try BartPE to boot your computer and to create the image.
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    thanks webmaster, no problem.

    As always thanks for the info.
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    Is this subject hit hard on the exam?
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • snooper47374snooper47374 Member Posts: 43 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I know RIS, Ghost, and imaging like my back hand so if you have any more questions I can help out too!

    Btw - here's a really great site for package deployment and os deployment/imaging. www.appdeploy.com Forums and tutorials will help alot.
    Going to slowly study for 290. Baby due in May.
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    great thanks........

    Basic steps:
    - Install OS (WinNT or 2000) on your Master build PC
    - Install Apps and configure PC
    - Run Sysprep (with the optional sysprep.inf file). You run Sysprep from a command line.
    - Shut down the PC
    - Run your PC imaging software (usually from a bootable disk) to create a disk image.
    - Restore the Image to a new PC
    - Boot up the new PC with the restored Image
    - Sysprep automatically runs a mini setup wizard before you log on.
    The setup wizard can get it's settings from the sysprep.inf file already on
    the hard drive, or will prompt you for information if no sysprep.inf is used.
    - The PC will then be rebooted, and you can log on.


    after I boot with a booable floppy and create an image how do I get my old configuration back? Or do all i have to do is remove the floppy and re-boot?
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • shadown7shadown7 Member Posts: 529
    jescab wrote:
    after I boot with a booable floppy and create an image how do I get my old configuration back? Or do all i have to do is remove the floppy and re-boot?

    After you sysprep machine reboots it will be void of it's configuration. You will have to add your basic config settings (computer name, domain or workgroup, tcp/ip setting, etc.) yourself.
    jescab wrote:

    Is this subject hit hard on the exam?

    See, you need to know this topic!
    I did have a couple questions on my test. Make sure you know the syprep switches!!
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    This is indeed an essential topic for the exam.
    after I boot with a booable floppy and create an image how do I get my old configuration back? Or do all i have to do is remove the floppy and re-boot?
    Yes, if you want to use the master machine again, just boot it in Windows. If it is a member of a domain you will have to rejoin it.
  • jescabjescab Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,321
    Got it guys, THANKS!!

    I will study the SysPrep switches now.
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • snooper47374snooper47374 Member Posts: 43 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm not sure what the test asks for but I'd be surprised if it didn't mention the sysprep.ini.

    In the ini you can automate alot of stuff like serial #, domain, workgroup, computer name, and even a path for drivers! This way you can make one build for multiple PC models even if they use different drivers!! They just have to be the same HAL type but there isn't that many different hals. So instead of making a ghost build for each model in your company, you make a build for each HAL. I started out with models in our company and I was quickly up to like 10 images and more to go. Now I just do hals and am at only 4!

    Here's an example of a sysprep.ini, although they aren't doing the drivers path from what I can see. http://www.spea.indiana.edu/ghost/sysprep.htm
    Going to slowly study for 290. Baby due in May.
  • RTmarcRTmarc Member Posts: 1,082 ■■■□□□□□□□
    jescab wrote:
    Is this subject hit hard on the exam?
    I think I had at most three questions on my exam about that particular subject.
  • ccnpninjaccnpninja Senior Member EuropeMember Posts: 1,010 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Today I tested BartPE for the first time.
    After I executed sysprep, I shut down the system then booted on BartPE disc. I founf a utility named "disk snapshot". I guessed it is for disk imaging. At that point, BartPE prompted me to select the disk to image and to select a destination file.

    I have a question here: Can I create the disk image on another computer disk on the network? Can I create it on an external disk?

    Thanks
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