Certification for biginners in Information security

Noah IsmailNoah Ismail Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
Hallo!
I am interested in Information security ( Pen Test and Security analyst ), but for this time am dealing with Oracle database.
I need your advice, which certification in Information security is good for me to start.

Comments

  • broli720broli720 Posts: 394Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Honestly? None. You're an oracle DBA and you should be able to leverage some of that experience. Sure up your DBA skills and learn a scripting or programming language. Next, download Kali Linux and learn how to use the tools in that distribution. That should give you the experience you need to get starting in information security.

    You have to be proficient in something before you can make the security leap, only then will you know what certifications to get to compliment your experience.
  • MTciscoguyMTciscoguy Posts: 552Member
    One thing I am going to suggest to anyone wanting to get into IT, in some form or manner. I have hired a lot of people over the years, in addition to being in charge of many groups while in the Military. Before I say it, I know many here are not native English language speakers. Make sure you spell words correctly. The correct spelling is "beginners" not "biginners" As I stated, I know many do not speak English as a native language, but remember we have spell checkers on our computers these days. Not meaning to criticize, but working in information technology, require good spelling on the computer
    Current Lab: 4 C2950 WS, 1 C2950G EI, 3 1841, 2 2503, Various Modules, Parts and Pieces. Dell Power Edge 1850, Dell Power Edge 1950.
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Posts: 1,945Member
    Security+ will provide a good foundation.
    Andy

    2017 Goals: 1 of 5 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • docricedocrice Posts: 1,706Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I'd recommend reading through the stickies in the Security Certifications forum first:

    Security Certifications Forums

    You'll eventually discover that having general IT experience and knowledge (and not necessarily infosec-specific certifications) are a common path into infosec.
    Hopefully-useful stuff I've written: http://kimiushida.com/bitsandpieces/articles/
  • DavidEthingtonDavidEthington Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    MTciscoguy wrote: »
    One thing I am going to suggest to anyone wanting to get into IT, in some form or manner. I have hired a lot of people over the years, in addition to being in charge of many groups while in the Military. Before I say it, I know many here are not native English language speakers. Make sure you spell words correctly. The correct spelling is "beginners" not "biginners" As I stated, I know many do not speak English as a native language, but remember we have spell checkers on our computers these days. Not meaning to criticize, but working in information technology, require good spelling on the computer

    I concur. Typically, when you see a nasty red squiggly beneath your text, you've spelled it incorrectly. You might think technical ability will get you by (this is for everyone), but the overall impression you give speaks volumes. Your mannerisms, dress, using full words rather than "textspeak" (ooh, look, a red squiggly!), even if the person you are communicating with does the same, all contribute to an overall picture of you as a resource. Because, ultimately, that's what you are. It's a terrible way to look at it, but until people get to know you, what they see can make or break you.

    Massive threadjack complete. Two red squigglies total (3!).
  • docricedocrice Posts: 1,706Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    Correct grammar usage is actually directly relevant to a person's ability to perform security roles like penetration testing and analyzing security-related events. Report-writing and communicating with peers and clients inherently rely on professional-caliber communication skills at a business level.

    If something gets flagged by automation (such as the case with spellcheckers) and you didn't validate it, it shows lack of attention to detail.

    In addition, due to the fluid and dynamic nature of the infosec medium, the ability to do some due diligence research before inquiring about often-repeated topics indicates little motivation to dig for information on your own. I'm not directing this at the OP specifically, and we all have to start somewhere and obtain good influences, guidance, and direction, but unfortunately I see this trend way too often.
    Hopefully-useful stuff I've written: http://kimiushida.com/bitsandpieces/articles/
  • The Silent AssassinThe Silent Assassin Posts: 39Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Ease up guys. So he messed a word up big deal. It's things like this that cause people just to lurk and not ask questions.

    If you are trying to get in to Info Sec you can start with the Net+ and Sec+ for some basic fundamentals then perhaps move in to the Linux area. Download a copy of BackTrack, it has many tools already included that would be needed for pen testing. Download that, set up a few VMs and try to find exploits in them using system hardening techniques.

    Good luck.
  • MTciscoguyMTciscoguy Posts: 552Member
    Silent, if someone wants to get into support or IT, it is a big deal. Let them lurk and learn, and perhaps, I won't have to go in and try to figure out, where the mistake happens in 100,000 lines of code to fix a problem!

    Yes, it was a hijack, but hopefully one that helps someone get a successful career. It is very important!
    Current Lab: 4 C2950 WS, 1 C2950G EI, 3 1841, 2 2503, Various Modules, Parts and Pieces. Dell Power Edge 1850, Dell Power Edge 1950.
  • MTciscoguyMTciscoguy Posts: 552Member
    I just received a "reputation" negative by someone who did not have the guts to identify. In the future if you want to rate me and tell me "If you don't have anything good to say, then shut the F*(*( up, then at least have the guts to identify yourself! I am currently retired, studying this stuff for fun, I enjoy a 6 figure retirement income, because I listened and learned when I made a mistake. My constructive criticism was not mean, it was to help the person requesting information learn, when I was coming up through the ranks, I learned when my elders let me know I was incorrect! Now if you can't spell in this day and age, you look ignorant to those who will consider hiring you, it is not mean it is a freaking fact!

    Next time you have a problem with me, have the balls to identify yourself, don't be a chicken ****, let me know who you are.


    David P.
    Retired O-6
    United States Army, Special Forces.
    1 Silver Star
    1 Bronze Star
    3 Purple Heart
    Current Lab: 4 C2950 WS, 1 C2950G EI, 3 1841, 2 2503, Various Modules, Parts and Pieces. Dell Power Edge 1850, Dell Power Edge 1950.
  • MrAgentMrAgent Posts: 1,306Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Relax man, its just a forum. Ill give you some positive rep.

    Back OT. Read the security sub forum and figure out which route you wish to pursue.
  • MTciscoguyMTciscoguy Posts: 552Member
    MrAgent wrote: »
    Relax man, its just a forum. Ill give you some positive rep.

    Back OT. Read the security sub forum and figure out which route you wish to pursue.

    Positive or negative really does not matter, but, accept truth and grow from it, we all mess up at times, somebody obviously didn't like that I pointed out the spelling error, but if you have a problem with something I have said, then be an adult and drop me a note and we can discuss it. If this person that I pointed out his/her spelling was incorrect actually improves and gets a great job, then it worked.
    Current Lab: 4 C2950 WS, 1 C2950G EI, 3 1841, 2 2503, Various Modules, Parts and Pieces. Dell Power Edge 1850, Dell Power Edge 1950.
  • DavidEthingtonDavidEthington Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    The intent wasn't to beat anyone up. It was simply a recommendation. No reason to assume there's even the slightest bit of meanness or hostility here.
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