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Lost a promotion / Job offer somewhere else

CompuTron99CompuTron99 Member Posts: 542
Ok, this is going to be a 2 - parter.

Part 1-

This is my present situation:

I've been working for the same company for almost 6 years as part of a 3 person team. The team consists of an IT Manager, and Infrastructure Support Person (me), and an applications trainer (not a developer). My IT Manager is moving so I had to compete with the trainer for the new IT manager position. Well, I lost out (the reason was that the trainer was already in the pay range, and if I had the position, they would have had to pay me more). My CEO actually believes that maintaining all IT equipment is a matter of rebooting when there are issues. Now I find myself reporting to someone that does not know what wifi is or has ever used a cell phone. I am doing my best to not be disgruntled. So shortly after the announcement was made, and my new IT manager ask me to train them on how to configure our routers and servers, I decided to look elsewhere....

Part 2 -

Without saying where I live, the job marker by me is really active. The area is seeing A LOT of investment from tech / banking / healthcare companies. I've been to 3 interviews, and I am working on scheduling several more. These positions for are Network / Sys Admin jobs.
I was given an offer letter for one of the positions. It's a Sys Admin job about 20 miles from home (I presently work 3 miles from home), with a 27% pay increase. I will lose 2 weeks of vacation and my health care coverage will cost an additional 4K a year. My commute will cost an additional 5K (fuel, car maint). It is not an ideal job, and I don't want to "just" take a job to get out of where I am.
I am debating on whether or not to pass on the position, and look at the other opportunities. I know it's a gamble, but I have "job security" where I am.

Any opinions?

Comments

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    Kinet1cKinet1c Member Posts: 604 ■■■■□□□□□□
    1. You need to leave where you are, your new "manager" will not have a clue what has to be done so it's best just to leave.

    2. Any room for negotiation on the new offer?

    3. I'd always look at what else is out there, don't take the first thing that comes along unless it's a dream come through.
    2018 Goals - Learn all the Hashicorp products

    Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity
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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Patience is a virtue. If the new potential job makes you excited, mentally stimulated, and will further your career, then go for it. However, how you describe it does not seem that way. I think you know that you should wait it out.

    Also I'm not sure what you make now but from what you described it sounds like part of that 27% increase is offset by the additional expenses you're incurring.
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    puertorico1985puertorico1985 Member Posts: 205
    I'm with Kinet1c on this one. A manager with no sense of how to manage, or any knowledge of the systems they work with, will make your work environment unsuitable and will make you despise going into work sooner or later. I would continue looking for a new position, and whether or not you accept the offer at hand depends on if you feel that the job with the increase in pay is worth it.
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    CyberfiSecurityCyberfiSecurity Member Posts: 184
    Why did your CEO chose him (non-technical) for IT Management position? IT Management is not managing people, but managing technology, which require technical knowledge and skill. Have you ever thought why your new IT Manager wants you to do technical training them? Simply because he might think you are disgruntled, so he would not depends on you for the job. It is a smartly move for him, he might even want to replace you with a junior guy for less pay (ROI). To make a move, you have to question yourself. Would the new job pay more after different costs on travel, vacation, and health insurance? Do you enjoy doing System admin work? If so, then...make a move.

    What would be his reaction if you refuse to teach them? Well, for job security purpose you don't have to teach them. If so, you could request for a pay raise. If teaching is not your responsibility, they cannot fire you for it.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Vice President | Citigroup, Inc.
    President/CEO | Agility Fidelis, Inc.
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    markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Based on what you've said it sounds like it's time to switch careers but I'm not sure if this other job would be much improvement unless you can negotiate or have a lot of room for growth. It doesn't look like it's much of a raise if you're forking out almost 10k more in bills. I would probably keep looking for another job.
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    Rosco2382Rosco2382 Member Posts: 205 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Honestly, if you are unhappy then it is best to move on. Like others said, you are in a good position of having a job already, take to time to find the right job for you, not just the first that comes offering.

    I was in a similar position with my last company. They felt I was not deserving of a pay raise and I started looking else where. I only took the position I am in now because I waited 4 months for the best job for ME. I had three offers before but they were lateral moves or just barely a step up from where I was previously.

    Take your time, you will find what you want.
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    CyberfiSecurityCyberfiSecurity Member Posts: 184
    Actually, I would recommend you to take the new offer. As soon you give your current employer two weeks notice. They might come back with a pay raise as you have mention that the new IT Manager has no idea the current technology operations.

    It is 50% chance that they will give you a pay raise. Just accept the offer, and give two weeks notice. Also, as the same time looking for new position as well.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Vice President | Citigroup, Inc.
    President/CEO | Agility Fidelis, Inc.
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    kriscamaro68kriscamaro68 Member Posts: 1,186 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Actually, I would recommend you to take the new offer. As soon you give your current employer two weeks notice. They might come back with a pay raise as you have mention that the new IT Manager has no idea the current technology operations.

    It is 50% chance that they will give you a pay raise. Just accept the offer, and give two weeks notice. Also, as the same time looking for new position as well.

    I would not go this route. You will get the raise train some people then get sh!t canned the following week for not being a team player in the first place. Your new manager is not going to be all lovey dovey knowing you were out searching for a new job because he became manager. He will be looking for the first opportunity to get rid of you. Heck he may already be doing that hence the training other people to do what you do. I say do all you can to not deal with the training and look hard for a new job and blow that popsicle stand when the time is right.
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    puertorico1985puertorico1985 Member Posts: 205
    I would also advise against going back to your company to try and get a raise. That route only leads to pain and destruction.
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    sbhawksbhawk Member Posts: 27 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Going back to an old job is like goin back to an ex. It didn't work out the first time. It may seem fine at first, but in time it'll go back to the way it was before. It's best just to move on, but as they mentioned take your time to find a new job.
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    itdaddyitdaddy Member Posts: 2,089 ■■■■□□□□□□
    computron

    story of my life....need new CEO now!!!!!!
    My CEO actually believes that maintaining all IT equipment is a matter of rebooting when there are issues.
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    itdaddyitdaddy Member Posts: 2,089 ■■■■□□□□□□
    stay until you find the right job..I see the IT job market opening up and by you staying you are getting more experience.
    it is hard to stay because you feel ripped off I know but just suck it up....talking from experience. just be a yes man it will get your farther in life ...I am not a YES man it has gotten me nowhere! trust me say YES to all the long hours taken from your family along with normal work hours, say YES to anything they want if they think a product is great even though you know from your experience it is crap, just say YES, say YES to anything your CEO and pansy ASSSS management teams wants bu lookand plan to jump out of their and when you have solid place to land leave and don't come back! from my experience.

    it I good to count the cost you are smart guy!
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    Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,772 ■■■■■■■■□□
    If the true reason you did not get the promotion over your coworker is so they could avoid paying you a fair wage in the new position then I would certainly agree with you it is time to move on. It says a lot about what you can expect in the future.

    I would say don't be in a rush to take a job but I would be fair and try to work with your current department so that everyone can be up to speed when you do finally leave. You current boss might make good reference someday. I don't suggest creating any more problems then necessary.

    Good Luck!
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    cyberguyprcyberguypr Mod Posts: 6,928 Mod
    As others have said, never entertain counteroffers. And pay attention to what itdaddy said. Stay put until you get the right gig. Back in 2011 I was in that position: miserable and wanted to get out ASAP. I had something lined up with a nice offer and nice benefits but there was added commute and the gig was within my comfort zone, not a new challenge like I was looking for. I stayed put and and a month down the road an excellent opportunity popped up. It's been working great for the last 3 years. Ride it out while you do your homework.
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    CompuTron99CompuTron99 Member Posts: 542
    Kinet1c wrote: »
    1. You need to leave where you are, your new "manager" will not have a clue what has to be done so it's best just to leave.

    I agree.

    Kinet1c wrote: »
    2. Any room for negotiation on the new offer?

    No I had reached the max the position was going to pay.
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    CompuTron99CompuTron99 Member Posts: 542
    Why did your CEO chose him (non-technical) for IT Management position? IT Management is not managing people, but managing technology, which require technical knowledge and skill.

    My CEO would disagree. I know it was about $$. The savings on keeping two people at the same wages, then bring in a new entry level person will save money.
    Have you ever thought why your new IT Manager wants you to do technical training them? Simply because he might think you are disgruntled, so he would not depends on you for the job. It is a smartly move for him, he might even want to replace you with a junior guy for less pay (ROI).

    I don't see myself with any less job security. I am not acting any different. The main reason for that training was in case I was on vacation or got hit by a bus.
    What would be his reaction if you refuse to teach them? Well, for job security purpose you don't have to teach them. If so, you could request for a pay raise. If teaching is not your responsibility, they cannot fire you for it.

    I won't refuse to, but if nothing comes along, I will ask for a raise using my new job responsibilities.
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    CompuTron99CompuTron99 Member Posts: 542
    I was able to find a new position as a Network Administrator on 9/24/14. Patience does pay off.
    Thank you for your help.
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    TomkoTechTomkoTech Member Posts: 438
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    colemiccolemic Member Posts: 1,569 ■■■■■■■□□□
    I was able to find a new position as a Network Administrator on 9/24/14. Patience does pay off.
    Thank you for your help.

    Congrats, glad to see your patience paid off.
    Working on: staying alive and staying employed
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    MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 Member Posts: 899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Congrats on the new job! I'm sure you'll be very happy.

    (didn't realize that the original post was so far back lol)
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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    Congrats on the new gig! Is it aligned with your career goals? What have you been doing in the position?
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    anoeljranoeljr Member Posts: 278 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Congrats on the new job! And always remember, patience is a virtue.
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    NotHackingYouNotHackingYou Member Posts: 1,460 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Congratulations!
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
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    dbzrfldbzrfl Member Posts: 40 ■■□□□□□□□□
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    ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Member Posts: 2,008 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Is there anyway to interpret "we wanted to give you the job, but we'd have to pay you more" in a positive light? That's like a slap in the face. Glad you found something else, and passing on that 1st offer seems like the right call.
    Currently reading:
    IPSec VPN Design 44%
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    itdaddyitdaddy Member Posts: 2,089 ■■■■□□□□□□
    [QUOTEMy CEO actually believes that maintaining all IT equipment is a matter of rebooting when there are issues. Now I find myself reporting to someone that does not know what wifi is or has ever used a cell phone. I am doing my best to not be disgruntled. So shortly after the announcement was made, and my new IT manager ask me to train them on how to configure our routers and servers, I decided to look elsewhere][/QUOTE].....................................................................................................DUDE you sound like my life omgosh story of my life maybe it is a disease today that people who make bucks thinks just reboot you are good now teach us your skills and we pay you less money just pissssses a guy off you know!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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    hustlerb01hustlerb01 Banned Posts: 16 ■□□□□□□□□□
    nice hustle,

    all the best
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    Kinet1cKinet1c Member Posts: 604 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Congrats on the new job, hope it works out for you. :)
    2018 Goals - Learn all the Hashicorp products

    Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity
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    WiseWunWiseWun Member Posts: 285
    Congrats! Patience is a virtue and I'm glad you got out.
    "If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.” - Ken Robinson
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