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Can I ask this in an interview?

JamesRFJamesRF Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
I've got a interview with a local casino in a few hours and I have a question. Is it OK to ask during the interview what the pay range is? Is that normally brought up by the interviewer?

My experience has been that most post on the job announcement the range.

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    markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Yes, I would. I want to know what I'm getting paid.
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    Vask3nVask3n Member Posts: 517
    markulous wrote: »
    Yes, I would. I want to know what I'm getting paid.

    From a practical perspective, like markulous said, I guess no one's feelings are hurt if you do ask that question.

    In practice though I usually hold off on salary questions until the second interview, if there is a second interview in the first place. Either that, or I will wait for the interviewer to ask about compensation.

    If it does not come up in the first interview and you still really want to know up front, I might try to massage the question in like "Historically what is the expected compensation for someone in this position?"

    Then again, I am usually more on the cautious side when it comes to handling interviews so the more direct path is to ask it up front.
    Working on MS-ISA at Western Governor's University
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    BerkshireHerdBerkshireHerd Member Posts: 185
    There is no sense in wasting anyone's time if you do not know the salary and you need to make at least X. I make sure it comes up early in the conversation. Be honest and say you respect the interviewers time and that you want to be sure we are in the ballpark.
    Identity & Access Manager // B.A - Marshall University 2005
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    Vask3nVask3n Member Posts: 517
    I guess one thing I might add to my previous comment is that the majority of interviews I do are for jobs that have posted salary ranges to begin with, I don't think I have done one where I go in with absolutely no idea what the salary range is.

    If the company posts no information on compensation on the job posting that would be all the more reason to ask it in my opinion.
    Working on MS-ISA at Western Governor's University
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    Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,310 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I think it is so silly when I see hiring managers post that this is a turn off for some of them. You are looking for a job to get paid, nothing wrong with knowing if you are both in the same ball park so no one is wasting their time.
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    NemowolfNemowolf Member Posts: 319 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would say to keep questions on money off the table for the initial conversation and instead ask more poignant questions such as if there will be a second interview if they select you amongst their top candidates. If there is only one round of interviews, discuss it in more broad terms as "compensation" rather than just salary. Find out what they are going to offer you as an employee such as 401k, Pension, Medical, Dental, Vision, and any ancillary benefits such as gym memberships, onsite services such as dentists and car maintenance, or even just bagels on fridays or casual dress days.

    If money is a serious topic, make sure you remember that "salary" is never just salary. There are ways to make a job more enticing on their part without making the money THE deciding factor.
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    CyberfiSecurityCyberfiSecurity Member Posts: 184
    JamesRF wrote: »
    I've got a interview with a local casino in a few hours and I have a question. Is it OK to ask during the interview what the pay range is? Is that normally brought up by the interviewer?

    My experience has been that most post on the job announcement the range.


    I would not recommend to bring up the paid unless it brought up by the prospect employer. And sometimes the interviewer do not know ho much the company pays for your position. I would wait for the offer, usually the offer will tell you a number, and you start to negotiate.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Vice President | Citigroup, Inc.
    President/CEO | Agility Fidelis, Inc.
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    BradleyHUBradleyHU Member Posts: 918 ■■■■□□□□□□
    i would have asked from before setting up the interview...

    i used to be like some of ya'll, and not wanna ask....but then i realized how much a waste of time it is to go on multiple rounds of interviews, then only in the end to find out the role is paying less than what i'm looking for. When you get ask in the beginning before any interviews, you can avoid wasting their's, and more importantly, YOUR time...
    Link Me
    Graduate of the REAL HU & #1 HBCU...HAMPTON UNIVERSITY!!! #shoutout to c/o 2004
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    cyberguyprcyberguypr Mod Posts: 6,928 Mod
    Agree. My time, as well as my potential employer's, is very valuable. For that reason I would never entertain interviews without having at least a solid range.
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    ande0255ande0255 Banned Posts: 1,178
    I'd bring up the question in the format of asking about "compensation" and "benefits" when talking about pay or PTO during an interview, in terms of how to word the question when it's your turn to ask questions at the end of the interview icon_thumright.gif

    Good luck getting the job!
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    LionelTeoLionelTeo Member Posts: 526 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Hi TC,

    If the company is good, there is actually no need to ask for that kind of question. Base on experience, I had always stated my expected salary in resumes, and had been getting into good companies, and they usually paid way higher than what I put in my expected. Check out glassdoor and see what are some people are saying. Good companies will pay the amount no matter what it is, crap companies will pay you as low as possible. A casino should be quite rich right? If the upper management is generous enough, you would get good benefits, if the upper management is all about budgets, then no matter how much you would had wished for, you would had a hard time getting it.

    But then again, if people in your area are so friendly and responsive, you probably had no harm to ask it. But most of the resume or job advisory sites would advise against doing so as it may severely drop your chance being employed, leave the money question out until when they had already wanted to employ you, then you could always try to bring up to ask for xxx amount and have the HR to get back to the employers afterward. They could give in if you can put up a great reason, but even if they are severely under budget, they will not reject hiring you unless you reject the counter offer.
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