Can a subscriber buy an E1 for voice

acomberacomber Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
I think that generally companies with say 50+ employees would purchase an PRI ISDN30 line from their network provider. But I heard that sometimes customers buy an E1 line. I know that an E1 line is always on? Does this mean it is a leased line? How does that connect to the PSTN? Can a PBX connect to an E1 line in this way?

Any answers would be most appreciated. Also any references to online or book materials covering such areas would be very helpful.

Comments

  • pitviperpitviper CCNP:Collaboration, CCNP:R&S, CCNA:S, CCNA:V, CCNA, CCENT Member Posts: 1,376 ■■■■■■■□□□
    E1 PRI is what you're looking for - I don't see anyone using flex-T1/E1s anymore. PBX would need an E1 PRI card (or VWIC if it's a Cisco Router). Depending on the voice infrastructure and or type of environment (not a call center) SiP would also be an alternative.
    CCNP:Collaboration, CCNP:R&S, CCNA:S, CCNA:V, CCNA, CCENT
  • acomberacomber Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    So a Cisco VWIC card would be for some sort of VoIP? So probably SIP? But if a customer doesn't have ISDN30 (or some other PSTN) then they can only be contacted via VoIP protocols? Although I guess some vendor might offer a PSTN gateway to some number which terminates to their VWIC card?

    I get the impression that not many companies are doing that sort of thing yet? Correct?
  • roch_gregroch_greg Member Posts: 87 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm guessing your over in the EU as here in the States we used T-Carriers (T1-T3). You are correct in that T or E carriers are leased lines from the local telco. You are also correct in that they are always on just like broadband connections (Cable and DSL).

    I don't know that Cisco makes PBX's (Private Branch Exchanges). The line from the telco usually connects to a module though. You will need to see if that module can support a E1 (24 pairs).

    Voip is voice traffic over a data network (packet switched) whereas traditional voice is carried over a circuit switched network.

    So if you were using Cisco Kit for your VOIP then yes you would need to install the appropriate VIC/Wic card in a router and connect it up to your PBX. I haven't studied the Cisco Voice Track but I think that they also have a gateway as part of their setup.
    Goals for 2014: Cisco ICND1[X], Cisco ICND2/CCNA R&S[X], Junos, Associate (JNCIA-Junos)[ ]
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  • aaron0011aaron0011 Member Posts: 330
    acomber wrote: »
    So a Cisco VWIC card would be for some sort of VoIP? So probably SIP? But if a customer doesn't have ISDN30 (or some other PSTN) then they can only be contacted via VoIP protocols? Although I guess some vendor might offer a PSTN gateway to some number which terminates to their VWIC card?

    I get the impression that not many companies are doing that sort of thing yet? Correct?

    VWICs can be used to channelize a PRI or act as CSU/DSU for a data T1/E1. A single circuit can also be split to do voice and data. In a Cisco solution the router acts as a H.323 or MGCP gateway for CUCM (PBX) to provide access to the PSTN. This is traditional TDM that has been around for awhile.

    The alternative is SIP, which is strictly IP that terminates to CUBE router (SBC between CUCM and the SIP trunk provider).
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