CCENT exam advice for a first timer

[Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hello Forum

I am taking my CCENT next Friday October 24th and I am getting very nervous. I have passed the Boson practice exams with a 915 and an 828 and a 846 but I feel like I am not ready (probably the last minute nerves) I put a lot of time into studying for this exam and I don't want to fail it. Besides the exam objective list, what have people really been tested on recently by Cisco? I have gone through the Exam Cram 100-101, Paul Browning CCNA in 60 days material (first 30 days for the CCENT), Boson practice exams, Odom's book, and Trainsignal videos. This is quite an extensive list but I feel like I'm not ready to tackle on this exam. Any advice?

Comments

  • slinuxuzerslinuxuzer Member Posts: 665 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I took the composite exam, but a few pointers I will give you.

    1. Once you click next on a Cisco exam, you don't get to move backwards.

    2. The composite test was a time crunch.

    3. Really know subnetting, be able to eyeball IP/subnet combos in all forms and determine if they are in the same network or not.

    Don't panic you seem to be a cert veteran.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I have taken the composite CCNA before and failed twice (519 and 588 )and I am aware that you cannot go back. I am just saying in regards to content/material. Last time I took my CCNA (about a month ago), I was told people were being tested a lot on STP and I had multiple questions about STP (things like that). That is something I don't understand why Cisco does that you cannot move back. I personally think that is unfair to the testing candidate. You may have recollection later on in the exam and you should be able to go back.
  • techfiendtechfiend Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Agree about not being able to review, that was helpful for me in the A+ exams. Hopefully the cisco's tests give plenty of time. A+ 802 was kind of a time crunch which doesn't make sense. You'd think it would be beneficial for the tester to have time to think about their answer rather than rushing through it because of time constraints.

    Is the exam cram for ccna good material?

    I used it solely for A+ and passed with 846/832 now using Net+ cram exam is flying by, already 50% done in about 10 hours of reading however it doesn't go very in depth, hopefully the test doesn't either.
    2018 AWS Solutions Architect - Associate (Apr) 2017 VCAP6-DCV Deploy (Oct) 2016 Storage+ (Jan)
    2015 Start WGU (Feb) Net+ (Feb) Sec+ (Mar) Project+ (Apr) Other WGU (Jun) CCENT (Jul) CCNA (Aug) CCNA Security (Aug) MCP 2012 (Sep) MCSA 2012 (Oct) Linux+ (Nov) Capstone/BS (Nov) VCP6-DCV (Dec) ITILF (Dec)
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■□□□□□□□□
    The Network+ ExamCram good. I used it somewhat for my studying however I found Trainsignal videos were top notch and were exact on the exam material. Mind you I took mine before the exam sim questions. In regards to the ExamCram for CCENT it is good. I wish I would have purchased the CCNA 200-120 exam cram as it was only a few dollars more (like 5-6 dollars I would say). Overall, it is not bad. I have bounced up and back between different resources (Boson, different simulators, my exam rack, Paul Browning, Odom, Lammele, everything you can think of) (I feel nuts) :) But overall it is not bad. It is right to the point and is a great time saver. The Network+ I can say from experience is this: It is not that bad. If you have Transcender practice exams and are passing them or even getting like 60% like myself, I passed mine with an 804 (not to bad imo) I didn't even go through the entire ExamCram book and I passed (however I have taken college classes for networking/security). Also, consider the Mike Meyers Passport guide for Network+. This book is great because he has some unique ways of remembering different networking concepts and a nice way to remember cabling standards. I'm not sure in regards to sims what you may get but they are not that bad. Since CompTIA is still testing these sim questions and finding the best selection, you may (keyword may) not have those questions graded. After your Network+, work on your Security+ then CCENT. Also, buy network equipment if possible or the Pearson CCNA Simulator. I bought Boson and Pearson CCNA Simulator and I think the Pearson one is better. What I don't like about Boson is the 3 year license after you purchase it. Since Cisco exams may last more then 3 years you are (sol) after those 3 years. The exam it self is very general as CompTIA exams are general (hence vendor neutral) it is more of a general overview of the different networking technologies. Once you reach your CCENT/NA studies, you get more in depth and picky configuration commands. (It is a pain in the rear I will warn you that)
  • mikeybinecmikeybinec CCNA 200-120 Member Posts: 484 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Subnetting----be able to subnet in less than 30-45 seconds. You'll get questions you don't know so get all the subnetting questions right. When I did ICND1, I felt really confident at each question and I had 10 minutes left when the exam ended. I passed, but not with a high score. So make sure you get the subnetting down pat. I am not a fan of drawing out a grid on a erasable board so you can subnet. I don't know how anybody can make that work but I could be wrong. Just know your block sizes and you can figure out any subnet question really fast

    Good luck
    Cisco NetAcad Cuyamaca College
    A.S. LAN Management 2010 Grossmont College
    B.S. I.T. Management 2013 National University
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I feel good with subnetting I can usually get it in 30-40 secs :) Just reading the entire ExamCram book over the weekend before my exam (right now in fact on Chapter 2) I will post a detailed review of the book when it's finished (probably within the next few hours or so)
  • ImYourOnlyDJImYourOnlyDJ Member Posts: 180
    Before you start the exam you have a couple minutes for the tutorial on how to take the exam, I use this time to pretty much brain **** stuff that I could forget if the nerves kick in. I personally wrote down port numbers, default Administrative Distances, and some subnetting stuff. Other than that make sure you are comfortable navigating around IOS and using various show commands.
  • Admiral AkmirAdmiral Akmir Member Posts: 40 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I was in the same boat as you, I was prepared to fail my first time. I had rescheduled it a couple of times, and finally just said whatever, I'll sit down, see what it's like and at least know if I was close. I passed, it wasn't a high pass, but it was a pass, and I probably could have done better. I had heard people talk about the time crunch, so I rushed it a bit and finished with a lot of time to spare.

    I think you are probably more ready than you think, chew some gum during the exam, and I would recommend writing down multiples of 16 up to 256, along with anything else you need.
  • ImYourOnlyDJImYourOnlyDJ Member Posts: 180
    I was in the same boat as you, I was prepared to fail my first time. I had rescheduled it a couple of times, and finally just said whatever, I'll sit down, see what it's like and at least know if I was close. I passed, it wasn't a high pass, but it was a pass, and I probably could have done better. I had heard people talk about the time crunch, so I rushed it a bit and finished with a lot of time to spare.

    I think you are probably more ready than you think, chew some gum during the exam, and I would recommend writing down multiples of 16 up to 256, along with anything else you need.

    I felt the same way... Worst case scenario you just bought an awesome practice test. The exam was quite a bit easier than I expected although that could be from the extra studying and labbing that I did thinking I wasn't going to do so well.
  • HeeroHeero Member Posts: 486
    I have taken the composite CCNA before and failed twice (519 and 588 )and I am aware that you cannot go back. I am just saying in regards to content/material. Last time I took my CCNA (about a month ago), I was told people were being tested a lot on STP and I had multiple questions about STP (things like that). That is something I don't understand why Cisco does that you cannot move back. I personally think that is unfair to the testing candidate. You may have recollection later on in the exam and you should be able to go back.

    It is just how their tests are designed...you can't go back. However, they design the test difficulty around the fact that you can't go back. If they did allow you to go back, they would probably have to increase overall question difficulty, or increase the minimum passing mark.

    Honestly, I prefer not being able to go back. Once I move on from a question, I put it completely out of my mind and focus on the next question.
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