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Asking above salary range?

TerminalBTerminalB Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hey everyone,

I just wrapped up interviewing for a new job, and things went VERY well, so I'm confident that an offer will be coming shortly. That being said, near the beginning of the process, the recruiter gave a salary range and then asked if I was ok with it - which I said that I was, but would likely be near the top-end. Assuming that they offer the max of the aforementioned range, would you guys say that it's ok for me to ask a little bit above that (5% give or take)?

I can tell that they were really impressed, so I'm thinking that I could squeeze a little more out of them, but I also don't want to ruffle any feathers. Also, I'm currently employed, so it's not a life or death situation in regards to taking the job.

Thanks in advance

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    networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Doesn't hurt to ask. Especially if you aren't in desperate need of the job. Good luck!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
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    lsud00dlsud00d Member Posts: 1,571
    There is typically always at least one round of countering expected, and as networker050184 said, it does not hurt to ask. I don't think 5% would cause them to call things off.
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    BeowolfjBeowolfj Member Posts: 16 ■□□□□□□□□□
    ALWAYS ask for the top end range, then be sure to stick with what you originally said when they try to negotiate you down. This shows not only a confedent quality but also shows that you know what you are looking for and won't settle for anything less.
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    TomkoTechTomkoTech Member Posts: 438
    You are asking the wrong questions.

    First consider how much of a raise their offer is over what you make. If it is a significant raise, why do you feel the need to "squeeze" out 5% more? Because you feel you aced the interview?

    If you feel the salary offer is low that is one thing. But you knew the range when you took the interview. So obviously it is more than you make now, and was acceptable at the time.

    If you really don't care if you get the job or not then by all means ask for more, but be prepared for them to rescind the offer based on that.
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    tkerbertkerber Member Posts: 223
    It never hurts to do some negotiating, however if you shoot too high be ready to get shot down. I did this once two years ago--was interviewing for a NOC position and nailed it and was getting great feedback. I got to the second interview with the manager and went past what they were willing to pay for that position and never got a call back.
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    TerminalBTerminalB Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the responses thus far.

    Just to add a little more detail, the top-end of their range would net me about a 20% increase in pay (with shorter commute). However, I'm somewhat comfortable where I am at and while that offer would have me leaning towards taking the job, another 5% or so would make it a slam dunk.
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    NersesianNersesian Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 96 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I don't know if my information is based on some sort of law, so take my advice with a grain of salt. I've always operated under the assumption that when a salary is offered initially, the offer could be considered null and void if you come back with a higher figure. In order to get around it, you might want to consider asking how the hiring manager "feels" about a higher number. This may not avoid them rescinding the offer, but you can always give it a shot. I'll let you decide if 5% is worth waging a war over.

    I also tend to assume any inbound offer will be around minimum acceptability range, but that may be due to me just being pessimistic.
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    Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,310 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Nothing wrong with asking unless they are already at the top of what they can afford and it's at or more than the average for that salary in your area. For example if the average for your experience, the area, etc is 75K, and they offer you 85K and you currently make 65K and you're going to get a shorter commute it might be a hard sell as to why they should pay you more. Just saying you'll feel like a slam dunk at 5% more might be hard to quantify.
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    pinkydapimppinkydapimp Member Posts: 732 ■■■■■□□□□□
    When you get an offer, if you want to counter, your very first question should be "Is that your best offer?" Then play it by ear depending on what they say and how they react to that. I don't see a down side in you at least asking that question. I mean, you need to weigh all options.

    And to be fair, you are in a comfortable role. So you shouldn't settle and leave unless its for the right role and the right price. So by all means. Ask if its their best offer. If they ask why, just explain that while you are comfortable at your job, you arent sure if that is worth the risk of making a change at that salary. You could say "I love the role and think I can excel in it, however, i am not sure i can justify the risk of making this change for that salary." Then again ask if they can do better. Try not to be the first to mention a number.

    Side note. In the future, when its early on, never agree to a number or a range. If they tell you the range and ask if you are ok with it, respond "Whats most important to me is that i find the right role, with the right company. So if this is that role/company, then i am open to negotiate regarding salary" This way, they are put on notice that you are going to negotiate and now you arent pinned to a range(the range they want you to be in). If they press, just say, "well, i really cant make a determination regarding salary until i know more about the company and role." Which is true.

    And one last thing. Once you have that job, its often very difficult to get a good raise. Therefore, your best shot at getting that money is before you start. You dont want to look back 5 years from now and regret not asking for more.
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    MSP-ITMSP-IT Member Posts: 752 ■■■□□□□□□□
    When you get an offer, if you want to counter, your very first question should be "Is that your best offer?" Then play it by ear depending on what they say and how they react to that. I don't see a down side in you at least asking that question. I mean, you need to weigh all options.

    I disagree. It's in your best interest to take command of the situation and make your wishes be known. It's easy enough for them to say no.
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    nachodbanachodba Member Posts: 201 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I was in a similar situation when I got my recent job, I was going from a Senior Sys Admin to DBA. They offered me 10% more than what I was making, I was like sweet. Come to find out, I'm at the low end of the scale and I should have asked for more. At the end of the day though, I got a 10% bump so it isn't that bad.
    2020 Goals
    work-life balance
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    pinkydapimppinkydapimp Member Posts: 732 ■■■■■□□□□□
    MSP-IT wrote: »
    I disagree. It's in your best interest to take command of the situation and make your wishes be known. It's easy enough for them to say no.

    We will have to agree to disagree. I guess whatever works best for you. For me, this has worked great. i never want to say a number first. period. With my current job i did this and they threw an extra 10k at my salary.
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    AwesomeGarrettAwesomeGarrett Member Posts: 257
    I dare say this depends on the position and field in IT. If you're in helpdesk and ask for what you're worth but more than they're willing to pay then they'll probably pass. In the long term the best advise I can give you is, know your field and geographical location.

    And remember:

    U.S.A.
    Average CEO Compensation
    $12,259,894

    Average Worker Compensation
    $34,645



    Always ask for more!
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    TomkoTechTomkoTech Member Posts: 438
    The position makes a huge difference. If you are working helpdesk now and they are giving you a 20% raise that 5% may be enough for them to say get bent. If you are making a move as a DBA and they are offering you 100K and the average for your area is 95-100k then that 5k is probably a lot tougher for them to swallow.
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    TerminalBTerminalB Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks again guys, great advice here.

    I would be moving from a sys admin position to a senior sys admin position. One other key difference is that my current commute is about 15 miles give or take, while the prospective job would be about 6 miles.
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    NotHackingYouNotHackingYou Member Posts: 1,460 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Assuming we're talking about a $100,000 salary, 5% is, of course, $5,000/year or $416/month. That's no small amount. If that's what it takes, tell them. If they like you enough, they'll either give it to you or tell you it's outside their budget.

    Just be sure you weigh the other factors - how does the cost of health care compare? Will you be on call more or less? The most important question is will this job help you advance your career? The title sounds like a bump up - but are the responsibilities?
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
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