Win 7 or Win 8 Certiications?

deano.cdeano.c Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello,

I started a new job last month and this is the first time that a company has offered tarining and certification (they'll cover cost of materials and first 2 exams), they have recently upgraded to Win 7 so no chance of win 8 in near furture (with the exception of tables) but who knows how long i'll be here right!?.... So my questions are:

1. Windows 7 or Windows 8 certifications ( i could do both, is it worth it?)

2. Course Material, what are the best books? i have online material available to me but want to ensure i am rerady for any exam i take

I am looking to become MCSA certified in at least one and if i do win 7 i undersatnd i can do 70-689 to upgrade to win 8 MCSA? but im not sure if Win 7 is worth it, i know it might be the new XP and live on for years to come but Win 8 may help with the OS that rpelaces Win 7!!!

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated, would be interesting to see what others have done

Many thanks

Comments

  • ChitownjediChitownjedi Chasing down my dreams. Member Posts: 578 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Honestly I would say go for Windows 8 for now, as Windows 7 probably is a little late in the game to go for with Windows 10 coming out in 2015... While Windows 7 will be supported

    Windows 7 main stream support ends next month, but extended ends in 2020, so you will have plenty of opportunity.


    Windows 7 *


    Service Pack 1


    January 13, 2015


    January 14, 2020




    Windows 8 has a while to go..


    Windows 8


    Windows 8.1


    January 9, 2018


    January 10, 2023




    My thinking is that Windows 8 will cover everything that you would have needed Windows 7 wise in terms of marketability, while some places may allude to wanting someone who knows Windows 7/2008R2, very rarely would being certified in Windows8/2012R2 hurt you. As long as you know the OS differences between 07 and 08 it is assumed you could support both.

    The fact that Windows 8.1 might have more in common with 10 then 7 does is the reason I'm suggesting 8.. as it may make your transition to Windows 10 certs easier (might not be a lot, but every little bit counts.)
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    I think Chi makes some excellent points, however if your company is paying for it, go for the technology you know you're going to be using which is Win 7. Win 8 is not business friendly and was more so designed for the consumer in mind. That's why you don't see it very widespread in businesses today. Sure Windows is releasing 10 but people tend to forget upgrading to a new OS is ultimately about the money (also takes a lot of time with planning and approvals) and businesses don't like to spend it unless they have to.
  • srabieesrabiee Member Posts: 1,231 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I agree, it is implied that an IT professional who holds the MCSA: Windows 8 certification would be able to thoroughly support Windows 7. Same with MCSA: Server 2012. I'd go with the newer technologies.

    Also, consider that the newer MCSA's may offer upgrade paths to Windows 10/Server Next that the older MCSA's may not allow. This is only speculation, but definitely a possibility.
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  • ibn_shaddadibn_shaddad Member Posts: 57 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I think it's better to get the win 7 cert and do the upgrade and have both :)
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  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Personally, Windows 7 will be the standard in most business environments for the near future, so definitely focus on getting that first. I'd also recommend that if you are planning on being in a desktop type of role for more than a few years, I'd then also get the windows 8 and when 10 comes out, upgrade that one as well.
  • techfiendtechfiend Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    What would you learn in windows 7 that you wouldn't in 8? While 7 is still the overwhelming favorite in businesses, windows 8 is gaining some ground. Where I work it's mixed but I don't see why I'd pursue 7 MCSA over 8.
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  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    techfiend wrote: »
    What would you learn in windows 7 that you wouldn't in 8? While 7 is still the overwhelming favorite in businesses, windows 8 is gaining some ground. Where I work it's mixed but I don't see why I'd pursue 7 MCSA over 8.

    Only reason I would recommend that is due to many companies sticking with Win 7 for the foreseeable future and would look better to those who make the hiring decisions. It's weird how so many lambast Win 8 ( I think it's a rather good OS, just different to use, and in my opinion, it's better) but because of that, they won't be going to Win 8 because of their own preconceived hatred for the OS when it's really just an interface difference in a screen they will rarely use anyways. If a person had to choose one or the other, win 7 definitely. If he can do both with finishing win 7 first and then doing the upgrade to win 8, that would be even better. But that also depends how long he expects to be in the desktop support world. I had thought of earlier picking up the win 8 cert, but really couldn't justify it when I was looking for higher level work, which I am now in. I'd only do desktop type work in the future if it was a last resort to make money.
  • deano.cdeano.c Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thansk for the advice guys... First of all let me say that i have nothign against win 8 and actually rather like it... that said im going to do the Win 7 MCSA (potentially upgrade to Win 8 in the near furture)... my last role was an all round support role, desktop, server and networking and i loved the networking and server side of the role, my new role was taken because of the company and the opputunities therefore desktop support is (hopefully) not long term.

    So as said im currently supporting win 7 so i think i'll go with a certification in this, the main reason for this certification is it's related to my job, my manager has informed me that once i have done a ob related cerification i can do pretty much any certs i like... so will probably look at CCNA or Server 2012 long term

    Anyway as said thanks for the advice!
  • LeBrokeLeBroke Member Posts: 490 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Only reason I would recommend that is due to many companies sticking with Win 7 for the foreseeable future and would look better to those who make the hiring decisions. It's weird how so many lambast Win 8 ( I think it's a rather good OS, just different to use, and in my opinion, it's better) but because of that, they won't be going to Win 8 because of their own preconceived hatred for the OS when it's really just an interface difference in a screen they will rarely use anyways. If a person had to choose one or the other, win 7 definitely. If he can do both with finishing win 7 first and then doing the upgrade to win 8, that would be even better. But that also depends how long he expects to be in the desktop support world. I had thought of earlier picking up the win 8 cert, but really couldn't justify it when I was looking for higher level work, which I am now in. I'd only do desktop type work in the future if it was a last resort to make money.

    It's a matter of 1. security and maintenance, and 2. lost productivity.

    While it might be worth it to upgrade to 8 from XP, corporations typically don't upgrade at least until SP2/SP3 comes out for an OS. You don't want to do an install on 400 machines and figure out a crucial feature you need is bugged and doesn't work properly.

    Also, remember, most people using the PCs aren't IT people. It doesn't matter how good an OS is. What matter is, it's a pain in the ass to figure out where everything is and how to learn it. In most typical enterprises you have more than a few people who can barely use a computer as is, and only do so because they're kind of forced to with new technologies coming out. Even the fact that a single button is in the wrong place and they can't find it can lead to helpdesk calls. Imagine an OS where everythingis in the wrong place...

    *Shudder*
  • PDFOURPDFOUR Member Posts: 19 ■□□□□□□□□□
    LeBroke wrote: »

    Also, remember, most people using the PCs aren't IT people. It doesn't matter how good an OS is. What matter is, it's a pain in the ass to figure out where everything is and how to learn it. Imagine an OS where everythingis in the wrong place...

    *Shudder*

    Exactly the reason why no one is touching Windows 8 at my current environment ( University) and previous ones. Over here people are using Win 7 or Mac OS X.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I use Windows 8 on my computer at work and use it at home, personal computer is a Surface Pro. I would recommend just going Windows 7. I think Windows 8 is going to skipped all together at ALOT of places especially when Windows 10 comes out because it is going to be more desktop friendly. I really hate the Windows 8 start menu on my PC at work, its fine for the Surface Pro, but on my computer at work I pretty much have a taskbar full of the stuff I use just so I can avoid having the start menu taking up the entire screen.
  • --chris----chris-- Member Posts: 1,518 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I use Windows 8 on my computer at work and use it at home, personal computer is a Surface Pro. I would recommend just going Windows 7. I think Windows 8 is going to skipped all together at ALOT of places especially when Windows 10 comes out because it is going to be more desktop friendly. I really hate the Windows 8 start menu on my PC at work, its fine for the Surface Pro, but on my computer at work I pretty much have a taskbar full of the stuff I use just so I can avoid having the start menu taking up the entire screen.

    Task bar full of stuff...it's like Microsoft was trying to turn win 8 into osx.
  • techfiendtechfiend Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    What would you learn in 7 that you wouldn't learn in 8? That's why I suggest 8, along with windows 7 mainstream support already passed.

    The start screen is terrible on a desktop but there's easy ways around it, windows 10 start menu is a lot like the start screen in a smaller window. I think it's inevitable that people are going to have to get used to it, use workarounds or move to a different OS vendor.
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  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    techfiend wrote: »
    What would you learn in 7 that you wouldn't learn in 8? That's why I suggest 8, along with windows 7 mainstream support already passed.

    The start screen is terrible on a desktop but there's easy ways around it, windows 10 start menu is a lot like the start screen in a smaller window. I think it's inevitable that people are going to have to get used to it, use workarounds or move to a different OS vendor.

    My purpose would be to learn the exact OS version that will be used for next few years.
  • Nafe92014Nafe92014 Member Posts: 279 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Classic Shell give you the Start Menu back. It's one of the most requested support that my clients ask of me at the moment. :P.
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  • ssnyderu2ssnyderu2 Member Posts: 475 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would go with Windows 7. Many companies just dropped XP for 7, so even if Windows 10 is great, it will still be 3 - 5 years (or longer) before many will upgrade. Its expensive and time consuming to switch all the desktop operating systems. XP stuck around longer than it should have and most only switch because Microsoft all but forced them to.
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  • DrovorDrovor Member Posts: 137
    techfiend wrote: »
    What would you learn in 7 that you wouldn't learn in 8? That's why I suggest 8, along with windows 7 mainstream support already passed.

    Why go with Windows 8 when most companies are using Windows 7 (Or in the process of upgrading to Windows 7)?

    For me, my employer for the most part has just upgraded to Windows 7 which is what I want to focus on. On a personal note, I am more comfortable with Windows 7 which should make the exams easier for me. I plan to skip Windows 8 exams all together, as I am almost certain my employer is not upgrading to Windows 8. It doesn't help that I am not much of a fan of Windows 8 either. :D

    Sure mainstream support just ended but Windows 7 and extended support will be around for years to come.
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Member Posts: 271
    Organizations typically skip every other Client / Desktop OS. Reasons: Unjustified cost and Microsoft usually puts out something that is not accepted by BIG groups for collaboration and daily tasks. Thus technology acceptance of that product is generally not rapid, unless the product is very cheap.

    Example Windows 98 and Wndows 2000 (server), then Windows ME (Skipped), then Windows XP (accepted), then Windows Vista (Skipped), then Windows 7 (accepted), then Windows 8 (initially hated but now being accepted by home users and some business; very slow adoption), Windows 10 (probably accepted). With it all said, these products usually have 6-10 years shelf life. I don't see Windows 7 phased out until at least 2017 or 2018.
  • IIIMasterIIIMaster Senior Member Member Posts: 238 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Start with Windows 7 then go up to 8. ALOT of companies are one step behind due to the fact their infrastructure sometimes are base off older technologies. Although xp is not supported BY WINDOWS ANY MORE you will still get those calls or tickets for 2003 or xp, the same will be said about 7.
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