With Cloud Computing, is there any point doing???!!!

King_84King_84 Member Posts: 31 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi,

As the title says, is there any point doing the Microsoft certs In the future? If most companies decide to go into the clouds, tech guys won’t be required.
Just curious, what are your thoughts?

Thanks

Comments

  • ChitownjediChitownjedi Chasing down my dreams. Member Posts: 578 ■■■■■□□□□□
    The "cloud" doesn't run itself. It just allows for a different way of providing technical services and that still requires people who know their stuff. I wouldn't be worried about if tech guys will become extinct any time soon. There will always be tech guys... the cloud just makes it so that there is a new skill set and market that you can leverage to make a living. It won't negatively impact anything anytime soon.
  • kriscamaro68kriscamaro68 A+, Net+, Server+, Security+, Win7 MCP, Server 2012 Virtualization Specialist, MCSA 2012 Member Posts: 1,186 ■■■■■■■□□□
    "The Cloud" is not going to remove the need for AD, CA, FS, DNS, DHCP, and many other MS technologies. All you are doing is setting those things up in a different place is all. We just had a meeting with a major VAR that does lots of cloud related deployments among other things and they said that 85% of companies that are using "The Cloud" use it for backup purposes only and nothing else. I am not too worried about the cloud. Also the MCSA/MCSE has a lot of hyper-v related material in it. If you can get a good grasp on virtualization then you are already most of the way there in being able to support the cloud cause that is all it is, is a bunch of VMWare/Hyper-V/Citrix clusters hosting other peoples data/infrastructure.
  • d4nz1gd4nz1g Member Posts: 464
    As the Jedi Samuel L Jackson said, someone has to design, build and maintain clouds. Also, you will need local services too, and transfer the risk of owning critical applications to a cloud company. Big players will play a bigger role.
  • GForce75GForce75 Member Posts: 222
    They are all correct. The concept of a cloud is the collection of servers that have the ability to be hosted through the use of virtualization, clustering, fault tolerance, and load balancing. Clouds certs demonstrate how you have the ability to manage that, but when you still run a VM... you need all the MS certs and etc to get the programs to do what you want them to do. A person who just runs a server who lacks an understanding of cloud tech will have a hard time when an organization utilizes products such as VM Ware. Chase all the certs still. Best of luck!
    Doctoral Candidate - BA (33/60hrs) ~ MBA/Project Management ~ BA/Business-IT
  • varelgvarelg Banned Posts: 790
    I think this a very valid question. Of course, this won't be the death blow to the IT profession but it may be a pretty strong blow to the proprietary technologies that ask for licences based on number of processors and clients' access. Like Windows Server for example. I just can't see someone shelling the amount MS asks for a cloud setup, when you can achieve the same with no proprietary software. Maybe King_84 worded it wrong, tech guys will still be around but I am really not sure about MS technologies.
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    "The Cloud" is not going to remove the need for AD, CA, FS, DNS, DHCP, and many other MS technologies. All you are doing is setting those things up in a different place is all. We just had a meeting with a major VAR that does lots of cloud related deployments among other things and they said that 85% of companies that are using "The Cloud" use it for backup purposes only and nothing else. I am not too worried about the cloud. Also the MCSA/MCSE has a lot of hyper-v related material in it. If you can get a good grasp on virtualization then you are already most of the way there in being able to support the cloud cause that is all it is, is a bunch of VMWare/Hyper-V/Citrix clusters hosting other peoples data/infrastructure.

    This^. I think a lot of people who ask these types of questions don't have a full grasp of what "The Cloud" is. Its been explained many times in other threads that can be found by doing a search on the site. The Cloud is just a sexy marketing term describing paying another company to manage your services at their facility.

    I used to work for a MSP, that provides cloud services. I can tell you first hand that its not worth it to move in that direction. The highest payer gets the most attention from the service provider and the lowest payer gets attention once in a while. SLAs, security, etc are all huge concerns when looking at moving services to a MSP and if you're looking to save money keep in mind you will get what you pay for.
  • MishraMishra Member Posts: 2,468 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yes. Everyone should take 1 hour to create an Amazon AWS account, spin up one machine and play with it. It should hopefully make you understand that there is a lot to manage within that machine.
    My blog http://www.calegp.com

    You may learn something!
  • bohackbohack Member Posts: 114
    Guys,

    My two cents... The cost of public cloud vs. private cloud (building it yourself on premise) is night and day different. Although you can push stuff out to a public cloud like Exchange to Office 365 with little or no cost. The basic systems of authentication usually remain local, this is what the MCSA/MCSE is all about. In the future I see a blended public/private cloud infrastructure. This is not a guess or a prediction, it is based off of cost analysis I just recently done for the network I manage (80 servers / 5 virtual hosts / 1100 clients).

    If you are purchasing SAN (Primary and Secondary) and compute power, you are capitalizing the cost up front. In 5 years you need upgrades because of service contracts and changes in compute technology. If you purchase the equipment or go to a cloud provider, the cloud provider have the same problem of generations of equipment and obsolescence. I just recently did a cost analysis with our local ISP and they were 4x the cost of us capitalizing the equipment and purchasing it outright. Amazon Web Services and Azure was 5x the cost.

    That factored into Stanford University foreseeing a 50% growth as per the Bureau of Labor and statistics in computing jobs in the next 5 years, it's a safe investment of your time to get certified and into the IT workforce.

    I hope this helps,

    Jon
    ______________________________________________________________

    NetworkedMinds - http://www.youtube.com/networkedminds
    MCSA / MCSE Educational Channel
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I don't know bohack... the OP has a good point too... hmmmmmmmmm what to do?

    Screw it! I'm going into real estate! PEACE
  • bohackbohack Member Posts: 114
    I agree that some indecision might be there, but I remember deciding on taking my MCSE 4.0 because 2000 was gonna be out soon. Procrastination of taking certs is the only thing that will kill you. There will always be a need for IT people... I hear it from my staff all the time, if we go to VDI Virtual Desktop Infrastructure you won't need us anymore. I need the staffing the same, I just don't need people replacing power supplies and hardware when it goes bad. I still get the calls for configuring Outlook and other services that it free us up to take on like VOIP. IT will never be out of work.
    ______________________________________________________________

    NetworkedMinds - http://www.youtube.com/networkedminds
    MCSA / MCSE Educational Channel
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