What kind of Certifications do you need for entry level Networking Tech???

PaPaJPaPaJ Member Posts: 8 ■□□□□□□□□□
I am currently studying for my CCENT/CCNA and I was wondering what other Certifications I should get for an entry level position as a Network Technician?

Comments

  • jerseyIT92jerseyIT92 Banned Posts: 93 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Complete ENTRY level would be the Net+. After the Net+ would be the CCENT, followed by CCNA. If you have more than 1 year of experience in networking, I wouldn't bother with the net+. If you do have more than 1 year of network experience, go straight to the CCENT.

    This is the book I recommend for the CCENT/CCNA. It's pricey, but has both the ICDN1 and ICDN2.
    http://www.amazon.com/CCNA-Routing-Switching-Study-Guide/dp/1118749618/ref=pd_sim_b_2?ie=UTF8&refRID=1TC4TQKNMT1GFZY7AES3
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAMod Posts: 4,133 Mod
    Network+ is alright. I think the exam is a bit price for your ROI but if you start to feel too overwhelmed by the CCENT material, I would at least recommend studying the Network+ material before heading into the CCENT/CCNA
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  • PC509PC509 CISSP, CEH, CCNA: Security/CyberOps, Sec+, CHFI, A+, Proj+, Server+, MCITP Win7, Vista, MCP Server 2 Oregon, USMember Posts: 801 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Depends on your experience or knowledge level. CCENT has the basics plus a whole lot more. If you're just coming into the field and starting from step 1, then Net+ makes a lot of sense. It's a good foundation that will help you with the CCENT & CCNA. If you know the Net+ material already, and are doing good understanding the concepts of CCNET studies, go with CCENT. Net+ is very entry level, but it's a good start for someone with no experience. Aside from that, it's not too great. It's quickly outdated if you do get a job as a network tech.
  • nsternster Member Posts: 231
    If you are not overwhelmed with CCENT/CCNA, you can most definitively stay on that course and not worry about Net+. For entry level networking, those are really your only options
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    Skip Network+, cost too much, no value and nobody respects CompTIA these days.

    Stick with CCNA, that is the entry level networking cert.
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  • Nafe92014Nafe92014 Member Posts: 279 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Sorry to hijack the thread, but this also brings to my attention. Would it be better to just buy a Net+ book and read the material but not take the exam? Like, just read the book then go for the CCENT?
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  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Member Posts: 1,034 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Nafe92014 wrote: »
    Sorry to hijack the thread, but this also brings to my attention. Would it be better to just buy a Net+ book and read the material but not take the exam? Like, just read the book then go for the CCENT?

    If you read the book, take the exam. IMO, there is no point spending time reading and watching videos without getting the cert on your resume.
    It can set you apart as an entry level tech.

    I had no experience, but had an A+ and a Net+. I was chosen for my first IT job based off of that alone. (Wall St. Firm too by the way).

    Then sooner on in college, I was awarded one of 4 internship spots out of 100+ candidates due to me having those entry level certs.

    If you are a noob, the time from taking and passing the N+ to studying for and passing the two required CCNA exams could open up some real opportunities if you want to quickly get your feet wet and get some experience. The CCNA is not easy at all btw, you could spend months studying for it without any credentials to get you that first job.

    Most people think that they can get a NOC position or a Net Admin position without any experience.
    If you are new, get the N+, find a job, THEN get a CCNA. You wont even be allowed to look at a Cisco switch if you are new in a support role.
    Many people get a CCNA and sit on helpdesk for at least a year and lose the skills they studied.
    Try and knock out the support type roles immediately with the help of the Network+. It provides a much bigger picture to a noob since the current CCNA removed topics such as wireless and security. After maybe 6 months of that first role, then get a CCNA because those skills can now be used to push for a promotion, or a chance to mingle with the network guys and move upwards.

    also, wtf are you holding in your avatar?
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  • PaPaJPaPaJ Member Posts: 8 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for all the advise everyone, it really give me some things to think about. Cisco Inferno, you really opened this up for me. Thanks again.
  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    Nafe92014 wrote: »
    Sorry to hijack the thread, but this also brings to my attention. Would it be better to just buy a Net+ book and read the material but not take the exam? Like, just read the book then go for the CCENT?

    The CCENT wil better prepare you for whatever comes your way then the Network+ will prepare you for.

    CompTIA is a sick joke and Im not laughing anymore.
    ***Freedom of Speech, Just Watch What You Say*** Example, Beware of CompTIA Certs (Deleted From Google Cached)

    "Its easier to deceive the masses then to convince the masses that they have been deceived."
    -unknown
  • daviddwsdaviddws MCSA x2, MCITP, CIOS, CSIS, CNIP, CSSS, CLNP MCTS, MTA, MCP,  ITILv3, LPIC-1, VCA-WM, SCLA, CTS,  Member Posts: 303 ■■■□□□□□□□
    JockVSJock wrote: »
    The CCENT wil better prepare you for whatever comes your way then the Network+ will prepare you for.

    CompTIA is a sick joke and Im not laughing anymore.


    Wow. It sounds like optaining a few Comptia certs really scarred you. Maybe the ROI wasnt at good as you thought, buy surely it wasnt that bad of an experience.
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  • jerseyIT92jerseyIT92 Banned Posts: 93 ■■□□□□□□□□
    JockVSJock wrote: »
    The CCENT wil better prepare you for whatever comes your way then the Network+ will prepare you for.

    CompTIA is a sick joke and Im not laughing anymore.


    They aren't that bad..
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Member Posts: 1,034 ■■■■■■□□□□
    jerseyIT92 wrote: »
    They aren't that bad..

    I agree. They are just pricey. Thats all.
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  • PaPaJPaPaJ Member Posts: 8 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Since there has been talk about Network+, what is the difference between Network+ and Server+? I have been told that there is not much of a difference.
  • RemedympRemedymp Member Posts: 834 ■■■■□□□□□□
    PaPaJ wrote: »
    Since there has been talk about Network+, what is the difference between Network+ and Server+? I have been told that there is not much of a difference.

    There are differences, but the main one is hardware. Server+ focuses heavily on Datacenter and Server hardware as well as Disaster Recovery. If you're a datacenter technician, then Server+ is a best bet. However, if you're going to be a Network Technician, then the N10-006 will more than sufficient for your day to day operations as it focuses on Network literacy and operations.

    Do NOT listen to people who say "Comptia is garbage" or "there is no value". Most people who make these comments are bitter. I work for the number one financial institution and one of the largest computer companies on the market and they value Comptia certs. We have over 25 techs at one site alone and they all have to have their Network+ (or A+) as a bare minimum to continue working. Some people have failed the N10-005 because they thought that going into it would be a cake walk.

    The test can be challenging for the novice which is one of the reasons (IIRC) that Cisco advises that those who take the Network+ do much better on the ICND1. Because of some of the overlap.


    Not having any experience, I would look for Comptia vouchers. The school I attended had vouchers for $100 and less so I never had to pay full price. You can also check Getcertified4less.com. A+ and Network+ would do wonders in separating you from the next candidate when doing a pre-screen or phone interview.

    I would focus on N10-006.
  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Member Posts: 1,899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I agree. They are just pricey. Thats all.

    Yea, I remember when the exams were way less. It's getting to the point where people should just go to vendor certifications lol. Since these are entry level certifications, they should be at a lower price... Sorry for the rant and I'm not trying to take over or anything like that.
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  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483
    daviddws wrote: »
    Wow. It sounds like optaining a few Comptia certs really scarred you. Maybe the ROI wasnt at good as you thought, buy surely it wasnt that bad of an experience.

    David I found this to be the case as well.
  • twodogs62twodogs62 Member Posts: 393 ■■■□□□□□□□
    The comptia are good entry level certificates.
    don't overlook them as they will give you good foundation to grow toward more advanced certifications.
    as well as growing experience.
    i would think most hiring managers would be interested in your EXTRA effort to get more education..
    it could help you stand out in a crowed.
  • srabieesrabiee Member Posts: 1,231 ■■■■■■■□□□
    The problem with CompTIA certs is that they are expensive, vendor-neutral, and the breadth of the material is "a mile wide and an inch deep." They aren't completely useless by any means, however I agree that the ROI on some of those certs can be pretty awful, depending on the specifics of the situation.

    Sometimes the A+ can help land an entry-level job. Sometimes a government job requires the Security+. etc etc..

    My former employer, an MSP, used to cross CompTIA certs off of resumes during the hiring process. (with the exception of the Linux+) They wouldn't even consider them as "real" certs in any shape or form. They wanted to see vendor-specific certs: Microsoft, VMware, Cisco, EMC, ect.

    As always, YMMV.

    On a side note, the fact that many CompTIA certs now expire after a few years and the CE program makes you jump through hurdles and spend quite a bit of money each year...that further cements the poor ROI of these certs. Dammit CompTIA, no one wants to go back an re-study for the Storage+ exam 3 years after the fact. icon_mad.gif
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  • nsternster Member Posts: 231
    why waste money and time towards N+ if he's capable of going for CCENT?
  • RemedympRemedymp Member Posts: 834 ■■■■□□□□□□
    The purpose of the Comptia exams (A+, Network+) is to demonstrate literacy of the given technologies within the current market. It's not meant to be an expert exam. The purpose of the CCNA is to demonstrate the mastery of administration for Cisco Route and Switching products and technologies.

    Our current roles look like this:

    Level 1: Help Desk (ITIL cert within 30 days mandatory)
    Level 2: Desktop support (A+ Mandatory after 90 days)
    Level 3: Network support (Network+, responsibilities include telecom closet, VOIP, VPN support, AP verification, Storage disk swap out, Datacenter walk through, disaster recovery drills at warm sites)
    Level 4: Network and Systems engineering( MCSE and CCNA)

    We had a situation recently where we had to let go a CCNA candidate because they really had no idea what they were doing. He didn't falsify his credentials per se, but he was CCNA without actually touching any equipment. He had no experience, just the cert itself.

    I'm not saying don't go CCNA, I am saying if you're just starting out, the Network+ will be more than sufficient with regards to your resume (provided you don't have experience in the field).
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