Instruction job a career killer?

So I am preparing to transition out of the Army, I have an opportunity to teach a course on Cyber Security (for the Military), as well as traveling a little bit to teach Security + bootcamps. Ive heard that "those that cant do, teach" so I have been reluctant to really pursue the opportunity. I do love teaching though and the pay is pretty decent. I'm just kind of worried that if I decide to do this role for a couple of years I will I have a hard time trying to transition into a more practical hands on Security role. Anyone teach IT and have successfully transitioned in-between teaching and practice roles?

Comments

  • jerseyIT92jerseyIT92 Posts: 93Banned ■■□□□□□□□□
    Robertf969 wrote: »
    So I am preparing to transition out of the Army, I have an opportunity to teach a course on Cyber Security (for the Military), as well as traveling a little bit to teach Security + bootcamps. Ive heard that "those that cant do, teach" so I have been reluctant to really pursue the opportunity. I do love teaching though and the pay is pretty decent. I'm just kind of worried that if I decide to do this role for a couple of years I will I have a hard time trying to transition into a more practical hands on Security role. Anyone teach IT and have successfully transitioned in-between teaching and practice roles?


    I never really believed that. My old professor taught nights and was an IT manager during the day. He was a teacher, and could out-do anyone I know when it comes to anything in IT. The guy is so well rounded it's disgusting.
  • Robertf969Robertf969 Posts: 190Member
    Unfortunately this is a full time job, and I am a student by night, so I won't have any time left over to hold down a practical Security role as well. Ive always seen myself as eventually teaching College coursework in my free time once I complete the required education.
  • shodownshodown Posts: 2,271Member
    at the lower levels nobody would know the difference, as you moved up to teach higher level security classes you would stick out like a soar dumb. I had an instructor last year who was teaching a high level voice course. We could tell that he was familiar with the material that was being covered, but as far as using it in the field he was clueless.
    Currently Reading

    CUCM SRND 9x/10, UCCX SRND 10x, QOS SRND, SIP Trunking Guide, anything contact center related
  • BlackBeretBlackBeret Posts: 684Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I've seen a few people get out of the military and transition in to instructor positions. Most end up enjoying it and wanting to stay as an instructor even though they planned on leaving after a time. The others end up being considered SME's in the field and move on to course development, training management, or advanced roles. Part of it with the government teaching positions is that once you're in the contractor world you make connections and have no issues moving around. Honestly on the military/gov side of the house instructing is a good way to move up. Ask any AIT PSG or other instructor.
  • TheProfTheProf Posts: 331Users Awaiting Email Confirmation ■■■■□□□□□□
    I taught a few courses myself... Exchange, Windows Server, XenApp, vSphere, etc and my classes were rated quite high because of my experience in the field as I was able to correlate class material with real life scenarios...

    Someone who only teaches, might not always have the experience of implementing the technology, but it's not always the case. You can also do teaching and work together, perhaps your teaching might be part time or your day job might be part time. Don't let these kinds of comments discourage you.

    If you love teaching, do it.
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