ITIL Intermediate - test centres?

jonwinterburnjonwinterburn Senior MemberMember Posts: 161 ■■■■□□□□□□
Hi all,

Just doing some research on the ITIL Intermediate exams. I don't wish to use Exin Anywhere to take the exams at home; I'd rather go to a test centre, preferably Pearson Vue. However, when I look on the Exin site, choose an exam, choose Pearson Vue from the menu, it lets me search for test centres but not select any of them. And if I log in to Exin, and try to book the exam from there, the only ITIL one available is ITILF.

Does anyone know how I can go about booking these exams with Pearson Vue?

Thanks!

Jon

Comments

  • jonwinterburnjonwinterburn Senior Member Member Posts: 161 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Oh wait...I get it. You can only book the exams via the training provider. To those who have taken the GoGo Training path - does this provider allow you to choose Exin/Pearson Vue and a physical test centre for the exams? Or do they force you to do the Exin Anywhere format? Because if the latter, then I'm not going to bother. I can't be dealing with all that aggro. I work in central London; it would be much easier to stroll up to the test centre I know well and sit the exam. No mucking about proving my machine is suitable and I'm not cheating and blah blah.
  • eSenpaieSenpai Member Posts: 65 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I used the Gogo provided discounts to purchase the full complement of ITIL Intermediate tests via PeopleCert. All of these appear to be web-proctored as well.
    I thought Gogo was once affiliated with two testing centers for ITIL but now I can't find the other. However one ITIL tester (Loyalist) is exiting the ITIL business so that could be why I only see the one now.
    Working On:
    2018 - ITIL(SO, SS, SD, ST, CSI), Linux
    2019 - ITIL MALC, AWS Architect, CCSP, LPI-2, TOGAF
  • anobomskianobomski Member Posts: 53 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I did a search yesterday for an exam centre in and around London and I could not find anything. I also would rather do it in a centre. Too many distractions at home.
  • GrindzGrindz Member Posts: 21 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Use BCS, you can take the test at their centre - IT service management | Certifications | BCS Certifications
    Still on the BCS website, you can locate training providers, email them and ask them if they'll allow you to take the exam only option if you are self studying so you only pay for the exam but it opens up more flexible dates than the first option above - IT Service Management (inc. ITIL) | Find a provider | Existing providers | Training providers | BCS Certifications
  • Liz GallacherLiz Gallacher Member Posts: 107
    You cannot ask training providers "if they'll allow you to take the exam only option if you are self studying so you only pay for the exam" except for Foundation. All Intermediate exams must follow an accredited course (classroom or elearning). THe training provider is not allowed to provide an exam only option
    The Intermediate exams do not really fit the prometric approach, and prometric would not know if you had attended a course, and were therefore eligible to sit the exam. The options are basically paper-based, at the end of your course, or web-proctored.
  • GrindzGrindz Member Posts: 21 ■□□□□□□□□□
    ^ That's an interesting point. I've done my S.T studies through accredited elearning and been given several possible dates in which I can take the exam only option from some course providers after I emailed around
  • Claire AgutterClaire Agutter Member Posts: 772 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Hi Grindz

    Liz is quite correct - the rules are that as training companies we can only sell exams to people who've studied with us. There might be some companies that are breaking those rules but it's one to be careful of. Technically the accreditor could invalidate results of exams taken outside the scheme rules but I'm not sure they'd ever go that far.

    Some training organisations are also AEOs (accredited examination organisations) which means they can offer exams. It's quite a complicated scheme! icon_smile.gif

    Claire
  • GrindzGrindz Member Posts: 21 ■□□□□□□□□□
    ^ Thanks for the clarification, it's a pretty well known training center so I am surprised. I will be doing some double checking. thanks Claire and Liz for the heads up
  • jonwinterburnjonwinterburn Senior Member Member Posts: 161 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Hmm. Sounds like a money-making scheme to me. The relatively low demand for ITIL intermediate isn't worth the cost of classroom training nor the aggro of web proctering. No wonder so few people follow up after foundation. I shall give it a miss and spend my hard earned cash on more flexible and in-demand education. Thanks all for the clarification.
  • Claire AgutterClaire Agutter Member Posts: 772 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Hi Jon

    Just to follow up - I've taken two web proctored exams with two different exam institutes in the last couple of weeks, 1 in the UK and 1 in Bulgaria. I know you're very against web proctoring but I found it very simple so if you wanted any extra information or had any questions feel free to message me.

    Good luck with your future studies, whatever they are icon_smile.gif

    Claire
  • UncleBUncleB Member Posts: 417
    Hmm. Sounds like a money-making scheme to me. The relatively low demand for ITIL intermediate isn't worth the cost of classroom training nor the aggro of web proctering. No wonder so few people follow up after foundation. I shall give it a miss and spend my hard earned cash on more flexible and in-demand education.

    Hello Jon, what do you have against web proctoring? I found it pretty straightforward if you make a few alterations to your environment for the exam.
    1 - use a different room if you are messy like me - it can be a spare office after work hours or even a hallway (I just sat on the floor with my laptop for several exams) or similar where you can still get a decent internet connection. Borrow a long ethernet cable if you need to.
    2 - keep the room clear of any posters / open books etc. By using point 1 above this is much easier.
    3 - keep a mirror available. I got an A3 sized wall mirror from one of the local convenience stores for £4 which does the trick and also lets me make sure I am as handsome as ever :)
    4 - keep people out for the duration of the exam. Some notes to stick on the door if this is at work is an easy win.

    Thats how easy it is - some prep, a clean-ish computer (move the desktop contents to a different folder for the duration of the exam and close any other programs running in the background and it really isn't any different to going to a test centre other than it is only your sweaty hands on the keyboard/mouse.

    I would be interested to understand your reluctance to use this if from no other perspective than the fact I have just set my new team on a training route that involves all web proctored exams to minimise time out the office.

    Iain
  • jonwinterburnjonwinterburn Senior Member Member Posts: 161 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Hi Iain,

    I prefer going to a test centre for exams. It's convenient as I can pop in during my lunch hour or after work. I like the formality and professional feeling of taking an exam in a proper centre. It helps me concentrate and sets the mood for me.

    I don't like the idea of having to faff about with a mirror, making sure the area is valid by their standards or the risk that somewhere along the line something will disqualify me, like the doorbell going, the Internet connection dropping or whatever. I just can't be bothered with all that messing about.

    Thanks,

    Jon
  • UncleBUncleB Member Posts: 417
    Hi Iain,

    I prefer going to a test centre for exams. It's convenient as I can pop in during my lunch hour or after work. I like the formality and professional feeling of taking an exam in a proper centre. It helps me concentrate and sets the mood for me.

    I don't like the idea of having to faff about with a mirror, making sure the area is valid by their standards or the risk that somewhere along the line something will disqualify me, like the doorbell going, the Internet connection dropping or whatever. I just can't be bothered with all that messing about.

    It's a fair point, but then you have to:
    - find a test centre close enough to work that fits your available time
    - keep a fixed appointment for the exam (proctored ones are on-demand)
    - use the same equipment and seat as untold sweaty IT people before you (many of my colleagues are lacking in hygine skills...)

    I've sat 6 proctored exams before and the time to scan the room and do the mirror is about the same as going through all the pre-exam questions with the reception person in the exam centre then storing your jacket, phone etc in their locker. Different faff, but faff none the less.
    If the doorbell rings, ignore it.
    If your internet connection is halfway decent then there is little chance of it dropping in the short time window of the exam. I never took more than 60 mins for the exams so that is a pretty small time window and hence probability of issue.

    So far no issues, no connections dropped and all 6 exams passed.

    As for the concentration and mood, that is all in your mind and I can't really give much advice other than perhaps pretend you are in an exam centre.

    It really is easy and low fuss once you have done one.

    Good luck with finding a centre that works for you.

    Iain
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