Pros and cons of contract to hire positions?

thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/CollabMember Posts: 1,000 ■■■■■■■□□□
What are the pros and cons to contract to hire positions? Why do some people avoid them completely?

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  • ChitownjediChitownjedi Chasing down my dreams. Member Posts: 578 ■■■■■□□□□□
    thomas_ wrote: »
    What are the pros and cons to contract to hire positions? Why do some people avoid them completely?

    Pro's you can feel out the place and get a sense if it's the type of place you would want to be at long term.
    Con's you have to wait to get converted, and will not be afforded, sick time, PTO, & Company benefits.

    Reason why some people avoid them completely?
    Various reasons... I know one particular person who is a close friend of mine who doesn't do them because he's afraid of his own reflection.. and wouldn't take the risk of playing the Lotto even if you told him you can guarantee him 95% chance that he would win. Some people are extremely risk averse and lack confidence.

    Some folks think old school and believe FTE is the only way to work, and any company they go to is a company they want to be there 15 - 20 years. Contract and Contract to Hire for them is scary, and too risky. They don't like moving constantly and are scared of the prospects of finding work again within a short time frame. Most of them (the former colleagues I know that whine to me everyday about hating the fact they are still there, will not move if it's a contract or contract to hire) have confidence issues. For some of them it's out of practicality and the allure of benefits and knowing where they will be long term is way more appealing than doing contracts and contract to hire even if they have the ability to get paid a lot more, or learn new technologies.
  • ShdwmageShdwmage Member Posts: 374
    I will also add my 2 cents -

    When you have kids and are the only source of income for your household you are risk avoidance. I wouldn't take a contract job. Not because I don't think I can do the work, but because I can't risk the contract expiring and not still having a job.

    If this wasn't the case I'd be a lot further in my career and make a lot more money than what I do today. That being said, I am starting to take more risks in what I apply for. I know I can do pretty much any job that is put in front of me, the question is how long it will take me to get through the learning curve.

    I know my limitations and what it would take for me to learn a position, and I purposely avoid applying for ones that I couldn't get up to speed in a reasonable amount of time.
    --
    “Hey! Listen!” ~ Navi
    2013: [x] MCTS 70-680
    2014: [x] 22-801 [x] 22-802 [x] CIW Web Foundation Associate
    2015 Goals: [] 70-410
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,781 Mod
    Cons:There is noone looking out for you. It's like being the only one stranded on a faraway island. No benefits etc
    Pros: Not a darn thing
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • W StewartW Stewart Member Posts: 794 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Cons: What everybody else said. You're not an employee and you may never be.
    Pros: If it doesn't work out you can split without it looking bad on your resume since it was a contract.
  • adam220891adam220891 Member Posts: 164 ■■■□□□□□□□
    It's the responsibility of the employer to conduct thorough interviews and select quality talent based on resumes and interviews. They should have the confidence in the individual they hire, and therefore, not be able to use 'risk' as an excuse to offer a contract instead of full-time employment, in my opinion.

    I have seen may non-IT people be let go during contracts at my company (I was brought on permanent to begin with and am referencing finance employees mostly). There is a bitterness that can develop from the lower pay, no benefits, no PTO, etc. that is offered by a contract and the uncertainty that the company will offer you a permanent position (even if you are great at your job) is not an attractive state of mind to have.

    I see no positive to contracts.
  • Russell77Russell77 Member Posts: 161
    I was in a bad situation with my last employer and wanted out bad. A contract job came up with no guarrante that I would go perm. I took the job because I thought I would like it there and get something out of it even if it was for 6 to 12 months. The department is growing fast and one guy split for a different position in the company so I got pulled on board in 2 months. So it worked out for me. The interview for the position was very easy because the company knew if I did not work out it was easy to show me the door. No matter how much interviewing you do there is no substituting working with someone for a few months to see if they are a fit.
  • ChitownjediChitownjedi Chasing down my dreams. Member Posts: 578 ■■■■■□□□□□
    No pros?

    Ha.... Ive went up 11 dollars an hour to over 45.00 an hour over 2 years being a contactor.... Got out of being forced to stay in bad situations and have tons of friends, colleagues from different sectors while being exposed to the interworkings of 5+ fortune 500 companies.

    There are pros.

    Could i have done this being fte at one place? Maybe..but i have friends who are at those same places who are in the same positions doing the same thing..getting inflation increases. I don't know about everyone else, but i see contracting as a way to get experience and move to a professional level where when you do become fte, you can negotiate for the salary, benefits, work culture you feel is ideal.

    Contracting allows for accelerated experience and salary increases, once you get to your desired salary level then looking for FTE would be a pro... Until then i'd rather get the 10 to 15k increases every year doing contracts while certing up and working hard and networking until i get to the level I desire.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,781 Mod
    In my mond (at least, LOL) there is a difference between contractor and temp to hire. Temp to hire bites the big one...
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • kohr-ahkohr-ah Member Posts: 1,277
    I wouldn't rule out CtH. It is really like others said it is try before you buy for you as much as them.

    Same as ChiTown said I went up 10k during my contract then another 5k on the next one. No I didnt get vacation time nor medical benefits but I just called BCBS-IL and setup my own benefits during that time to keep us covered. Vacation while not paid I could just take off whatever days I needed which was nice but it is harder to do CtH when you have kids and are the sole provider. I would much rather be full time but I wont eliminate CtH if it is my dream job.

    It is a great way to get exposed to multiple environments but it sucks if you get "carroted on a stick" and never hired (which I have seen).
  • ShdwmageShdwmage Member Posts: 374
    If you can take the risk of contract to hire it really isn't that bad. If you go into it with the mindset that it is only a contract position and you keep your eyes open for the next contract. Its really good for the younger and less attached looking to move to a different area. Its easier to find a contract (to hire or not) position.

    A few of my favorite quotes:
    I'd rather attempt to do something great and fail than to attempt to do nothing and succeed.
    Robert H. Schuller

    “I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.”
    ― Thomas A. Edison

    And I think I'll throw this one in here too:
    “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”
    ― Winston S. Churchill
    --
    “Hey! Listen!” ~ Navi
    2013: [x] MCTS 70-680
    2014: [x] 22-801 [x] 22-802 [x] CIW Web Foundation Associate
    2015 Goals: [] 70-410
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