Network questions

mynameisboringmynameisboring Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
So I've been studying for Network+ on and off for some time now, here's a few things I'm not sure of and hope a few of you here can raise my level of confidence in this subject by confirming my answers...to my own questions :)

1) Does WINS require clients to have NetBEUI and/or NetBIOS.
A: WINS requires NetBIOS. Since NetBIOS belongs in the Application layer of the OSI model, any protocol, like NetBEUI or TCP/IP, that carrys NetBIOS names can function with WINS

2)What is an octet
A: An octet is equal to a byte, and is used to refer to cell sizes for ATMs. Ex: 53 octet cell size

3)Are both rings in a FDDI setup transfering data at the same time if there is no break in either cable?
A:No

4)What defines a segment?
A:I'm not sure about this one icon_redface.gif

Comments

  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    The first two make no sense at all. Netbios operates primarily on the Session layer, definitely not on the Application layer. WINS is used to map Netbios names[i/] to IP addresses. Has nothing to do with Netbeui. (netbios and netbeui were once one protocol, netbios has been separated from Netbeui so MS could use it in conjunction with TCP/IP and Novell with IPX/SPX.)

    An octet is a 'quarter' of an IP address... 192.168.2.24 ->>> 192 is an octet, 168 is an octet, 2 is an octet, 24 is an octet.

    ATM uses a 53-byte fixed cell size. Although the term octet is used in ATM. ATM and octets are not related in the Network+ exam ;)v (ATM octet header is part of the cell...)

    All this information can be found in our Network+ TechNotes:
    icon_arrow.gif www.techexams.net/co_netplus.shtml
    I really suggest you read those. All the things you asked are in there...

    A segment is a typically a cable or an extended cable (using connectors).
  • kai920kai920 Posts: 9Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    3)Are both rings in a FDDI setup transfering data at the same time if there is no break in either cable?
    A:No

    I'll take a stab at #3, someone correct me if wrong-

    FDDI features two counter-rotating rings: primary and secondary. The secondary ring remains inactive until the primary ring fails. Even if the primary ring fails, only part of the secondary ring is used to provide redundancy.

    btw, if FDDI is used with Cat5 UTP, it is called CDDI. ;)
  • curiocurio Posts: 76Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    An octet is eight of something. Eight band members make an Octet, eight anything else is an octet - kewl.
    In the case of Network+ eight bits is an octet, an IP address is made up of four octets - ie: 11111111 11111111 11111111 11111111
    we translate this into it's decimal equivalent 255.255.255.255 when we reference it because we think in decimal not binary. It's simple when you get it but it's impossible when you don't - like pointers or oop for the programmers out there - if you get it you get it.

    eight of something
    that's an octet.
  • lazyartlazyart Posts: 483Member
    curio wrote:
    It's simple when you get it but it's impossible when you don't - like pointers or oop for the programmers out there - if you get it you get it.

    Damn good analogy.
    I'm not a complete idiot... some parts are missing.
  • DrakonblaydeDrakonblayde Posts: 542Member
    /shudder

    pointers

    I'm going to go find some southern comfort and forget they were even brought up.

    I *hated* learning pointers

    /shudder
    = Marcus Drakonblayde
    ================
    CCNP-O-Meter:
    =[0%]==[25%]==[50%]==[75%]==[100%]
    ==[X]===[X]====[ ]=====[ ]====[ ]==
    =CCNA==BSCI==BCMSN==BCRAN==CIT=
  • mynameisboringmynameisboring Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the answers everyone,

    NetBEUI belonging to the Session Layer and the octet definition of it being 8 of anything is one that I have not been able to find in any book; And I've looked through almost 5 Network+ books in the libraries and book stores.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    NETBEUI belongs to the Transport layer, NETBIOS belongs to the Session layer. This used to be one and the same protocol stack, but now Netbios can also be used with other transport protocols, such as those in TCP/IP and IPX/SPX.
  • mynameisboringmynameisboring Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I should stop messing those up icon_lol.gif
  • WebmasterWebmaster Posts: 10,292Admin
    Yes, I agree ;) Perhaps this helps: remember that NetBEUI mean NETBIOS Extended User Interface.
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