CCNA Industrial Certification - Exam 200-601. Does anyone know if a book exist?

ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
I am looking into the CCNA Industrial Certification for managing industrial network for manufacturing, in specific exam# 200-601. I couldn't find any books on Amazon or from Cisco press for this topic. The only thing available is a course offered by Cisco it self and it's a $350 online course+lab. Does anyone have any experience with this certification, if so, is there a book published on this subject? Thanks.

Comments

  • DeathmageDeathmage Posts: 2,496Banned
    this has interested me too.... since I deal with allot of process manufacturing.
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Deathmage wrote: »
    this has interested me too.... since I deal with allot of process manufacturing.

    I am trying to get into this industry and thinks this cert would add knowledge for the industrial networking side of things. Currently I am taking a course called Industrial IP advantage, created by Rockwell, Cisco and Panduit. It covers a lot of the basic stuffs about networking in the context of a manufacturing/plant environment. I am not 100% sure what topics the Cisco's industrial certification exam will cover, but I like to learn more about this sector so I can get a job there.
  • TWXTWX Posts: 275Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    ITNewbie2 wrote: »
    I am not 100% sure what topics the Cisco's industrial certification exam will cover...


    https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/community/certifications/ccna-industrial/imins2/exam-topics




    [h=3]1.0 IP Networking[/h]
    [h=3]20%[/h]
    [h=3]Hide Details[/h]


    1.1 Describe the difference between enterprise environments and industrial environments
    1.2 Describe the components for making the data flow highly available and predictable in an industrial environment (QoS, IP addressing, protocol, and hardware resiliency)
    1.3 Interpret and diagnose problems that are related to QoS
    1.4 Describe the differences between redundancy and resiliency requirements / approaches between the Enterprise and the plant floor
    1.5 Differentiate the capabilities of switch types
    1.6 Describe the life cycle of a multicast group
    1.7 Describe and configure the operation and use cases for NAT
    1.8 Describe and configure the operation and use cases for static routing
    1.9 Describe and configure VLAN trunking to a virtual switch
    1.10 Describe and configure Layer 2 resiliency protocols (Spanning Tree, REP, Flex Links, and Etherchannels)
    1.11 Configure switch ports ( macros, threshold alarms)



    [h=3]2.0 Common Industrial Protocol (CIP) Knowledge and Configuration[/h]
    [h=3]19%[/h]
    [h=3]Hide Details[/h]


    2.1 Explain the CIP connection establishment process
    2.2 Explain producer/consumer models and implicit/explicit message models
    2.3 Recognize communication abilities and capacities in different hardware/hardware generations (revisions)
    2.4 Identify and describe the technologies that enable CIP Motion and CIP Safety
    2.5 Identify the applicability, limitations, and components of a DLR implementation
    2.6 Implement multicast features for CIP within a LAN
    2.7 Optimize RPI on a CIP connection given a set of parameters
    2.8 Enable and configure IEEE 1588 PTP at the system level
    2.9 Configure the Stratix using the Add On Profile (AOP) in Studio 5000



    [h=3]3.0 ProfiNET Knowledge and Configuration[/h]
    [h=3]19%[/h]
    [h=3]Hide Details[/h]


    3.1 Describe the differences in ProfiNET support between Cisco catalyst and Cisco Industrial Ethernet (IE) switches
    • 3.1.a Support for VLAN 0
    • 3.1.b Support for ProfiNET LLDP
    • 3.1.c Support for GSDs (integration into SIMATIC STEP 7)
    3.2 Describe the operation and purpose of ProfiSAFE
    3.3 Describe the three basic ProfiNET devices and conformanceclasses
    3.4 Describe the ProfiNET application classes and communication channels
    3.5 Describe DHCP and how it can be used for IP addressing of devices and configuration pushes
    3.6 Describe ring network requirements for ProfiNET
    3.7 Enable ProfiNET on the switch
    3.8 Enable Layer 2 QoS to ensure ProfiNET is prioritized
    3.9 Integrate the Cisco Industrial Ethernet Switch in SIMATIC STEP 7
    3.10 Configure and monitor ProfiNET alarm profiles on IE switches



    [h=3]4.0 Security[/h]
    [h=3]12%[/h]
    [h=3]Hide Details[/h]


    4.1 Describe the defense in-depth approach to securing the industrial zone
    4.2 Identify how a security component (hardware/software) applies to a network device to meet the network security definition of defense in depth
    4.3 Describe network device hardening
    4.4 Describe the concept and mechanisms of implementing logical segmentation
    4.5 Identify possible options to control traffic between zones (ACLs, firewalls, VLANs)



    [h=3]5.0 Wireless[/h]
    [h=3]10%[/h]
    [h=3]Hide Details[/h]


    5.1 Describe the differences between 802.11a/b/g/n/ac
    5.2 Describe the components that you need to build multiple wireless networks on a single access point
    5.3 Describe the difference between autonomous and controller-based access points and wireless workgroup bridges
    5.4 Demonstrate a typical switchport configuration for autonomous and controller-based access points
    5.5 Describe the limitations of using a workgroup bridge with a control communication



    [h=3]6.0 Troubleshooting[/h]
    [h=3]20%[/h]
    [h=3]Hide Details[/h]


    6.1 Troubleshoot advanced Layer 1 problems such as mechanical deterioration, electromagnetic noise issues, and infrastructure mismatches
    6.2 Troubleshoot VLAN trunking
    6.3 Troubleshoot an error disabled port
    6.4 Troubleshoot basic spanning tree port state and root priority problems
    6.5 Troubleshoot Layer 3 problems by inspecting route tables and NAT tables
    6.6 Troubleshoot Layer 3 problems in a VRF-lite enabled environment
    6.7 Demonstrate the ability to find the location of a device within a multi-switch network given an IP address
    6.8 Identify methods for troubleshooting a communication problem in a CIP environment
    6.9 Troubleshoot CIP using an Ethernet/IP browse tool, command line, and a web browser
    6.10 Troubleshoot device communications performance
    6.11 Identify the source of cable and device faults in a DLR
    6.12 Identify methods for troubleshooting a communication problem in a ProfiNET environment
    6.13 Troubleshoot ProfiNET using SIMATIC STEP 7 to view network topology, use the switch command line





    Honestly, this looks like an excellent renew-one's-CCNAs exam, a lot of the topics are normal network topics that an existing CCNA would have to know, and many of the rest appear to be straightforward.
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    TWX, thanks for the look up. You have some good points. This is an excellent renewal cert toward your CCNA when I am near my 3 year expiration date, and most of the topics should be familiar to a CCNA already. I just hope there is a book on this exam to study for the industrial aspect of the topics, such as Profinet, Common industrial protocols, Purdue model, etc. So far, the only thing available that I can find is a $350 course/lab offered through Cisco.
  • realPSIrealPSI Posts: 51Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    CCNA R&S or Security is much more valuable breaking in. Look for companies such as ABB, Emerson Pws, Siemens, Toshiba, Alstom, or a utilities.
  • broli720broli720 Posts: 394Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    You're better of going the routing and switching path. Information here seems a bit redundant. Half of what I learned in the industrial environment was through experience. Core fundamentals in networking were key though.
  • DeathmageDeathmage Posts: 2,496Banned
    this would be good to have after a R&S and Security.

    I will contest most of that blueprint above I worked with on a daily basis at my previous employer, they made corrugated boxes in a 1.5 million square foot factory with about 5 separate /22 networks on your typical medium sized campus network. Having a understanding of high voltage and I mean multiple 240a breakers right next to a IDF switch causes all kinds of problems.... learning how to properly divide traffic and shielding so that converting, manufacturing, tooling, shipping and receiving process data is no easy task when a building is literally a EMI nightmare...

    I mean I do Cat5e/Cat6 cabling myself because I used to run miles upon miles of cabling, and STP not UTP, STP isn't the easiest to work with...

    ...then QoS was a big deal so everything was on a small vlan with traffic priorities....

    ....then you throw sockets into the mix, every device on the PLC's had their own sockets....

    Glad wireless is on there, cause in plants you sometimes have Honeywell PC's on countless forklifts that all need wireless access in real time to ERP systems, and troubleshooting those issues while sitting on a forklift was very interesting to say the least....

    glad they have redundancy on there cause in a factory if a plant is offline for 5 minutes it can be millions of dollars of lost revenue and deadlines not meet by planning. So I remember I always saw a price tag for stuff and tripled it cause I needed a backup of a backup of a backup. When you start factoring that in for switches, routers, firewalls, servers, ether-channels, etc.... it starts adding up.... but the costs involved with everything offline was worth the cost....

    I remember one upgrade to run a distro expansion costs a frak ton of money, we used brand-new Cisco 4500E's and we need two of them even if one just sat there for like forever....we bought 12 of them.... that was a fun project to deploy but god dam was it pricey... moral of story you need everything redundant in an industrial network...

    as many know, my experience far outpaces my certifications, but that's normal with everyone. ;)
    broli720 wrote: »
    You're better of going the routing and switching path. Information here seems a bit redundant. Half of what I learned in the industrial environment was through experience. Core fundamentals in networking were key though.

    Completely agree. Industrial has so many factor it's nutso, you won't find them on a typical network...So glad I had the experience of it all so easy in my career. My problem is it made me a JOAT's which carried me into my current employer and I'm doing it fine solo.....
  • TWXTWX Posts: 275Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Sounds like if you're going into infrastructure design this plus a BICSI cert might be a good thing to have if you expect to do commercial/industrial.
  • DeathmageDeathmage Posts: 2,496Banned
    TWX wrote: »
    Sounds like if you're going into infrastructure design this plus a BICSI cert might be a good thing to have if you expect to do commercial/industrial.

    For sure, without a doubt. a Normal R&S and S won't cover the things you encounter in industrial networks. I know 1st hand, and I've yet to see the stuff I see in Process Manufacturing in any other network. L2/L3 from R&S is the core but you add on a few others layers too....I remember spend a ton of time on google....
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    TWX wrote: »
    Sounds like if you're going into infrastructure design this plus a BICSI cert might be a good thing to have if you expect to do commercial/industrial.

    Thanks for the info on BICSI. I wasn't aware of this organization's existence until you told me. Definitely interesting information to have. I am poking around the site for their courses as we speak. It's looking like they want you to take their course(s) first if you are a newbie, than you need anywhere from 2-5 years of design experience before you can apply for the RCDD exam.
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    realPSI wrote: »
    CCNA R&S or Security is much more valuable breaking in. Look for companies such as ABB, Emerson Pws, Siemens, Toshiba, Alstom, or a utilities.

    Thanks. Although I have my CCNA R&S already, I am always wondering what to get next. I guess all that would depend on what industry I am shooting for. That's really hard to say and it depends on who is willing to offer me a job at this point with all of my certification and limited experience. I would like to work for one of the above companies you'd mentioned, but I am also contemplating on getting a MCSA to diversify and mitigate risks, in case I can't get a job in the industrial sector.
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    broli720 wrote: »
    You're better of going the routing and switching path. Information here seems a bit redundant. Half of what I learned in the industrial environment was through experience. Core fundamentals in networking were key though.

    I would love to gain some experience in the industrial environment. I have been applying for jobs, and depends on what the result is in a couple of weeks, will need to decide what to do next. I'm guessing if no jobs turns up, my choices would be to further on my networking cert with a CCNP, or MCSA, or buy some of the courses on BICSI. It's a wait and see game at this point.
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Deathmage wrote: »
    this would be good to have after a R&S and Security.

    I will contest most of that blueprint above I worked with on a daily basis at my previous employer, they made corrugated boxes in a 1.5 million square foot factory with about 5 separate /22 networks on your typical medium sized campus network. Having a understanding of high voltage and I mean multiple 240a breakers right next to a IDF switch causes all kinds of problems.... learning how to properly divide traffic and shielding so that converting, manufacturing, tooling, shipping and receiving process data is no easy task when a building is literally a EMI nightmare...

    I mean I do Cat5e/Cat6 cabling myself because I used to run miles upon miles of cabling, and STP not UTP, STP isn't the easiest to work with...

    ...then QoS was a big deal so everything was on a small vlan with traffic priorities....

    ....then you throw sockets into the mix, every device on the PLC's had their own sockets....

    Glad wireless is on there, cause in plants you sometimes have Honeywell PC's on countless forklifts that all need wireless access in real time to ERP systems, and troubleshooting those issues while sitting on a forklift was very interesting to say the least....

    glad they have redundancy on there cause in a factory if a plant is offline for 5 minutes it can be millions of dollars of lost revenue and deadlines not meet by planning. So I remember I always saw a price tag for stuff and tripled it cause I needed a backup of a backup of a backup. When you start factoring that in for switches, routers, firewalls, servers, ether-channels, etc.... it starts adding up.... but the costs involved with everything offline was worth the cost....

    I remember one upgrade to run a distro expansion costs a frak ton of money, we used brand-new Cisco 4500E's and we need two of them even if one just sat there for like forever....we bought 12 of them.... that was a fun project to deploy but god dam was it pricey... moral of story you need everything redundant in an industrial network...

    as many know, my experience far outpaces my certifications, but that's normal with everyone. ;)



    Completely agree. Industrial has so many factor it's nutso, you won't find them on a typical network...So glad I had the experience of it all so easy in my career. My problem is it made me a JOAT's which carried me into my current employer and I'm doing it fine solo.....

    Wow! That was a lot of things you've mentioned that I've never even realized. From the get go, I had a feeling that industrial networking is probably very different than your typical enterprise networking, but just how different is something I am dying to find out.

    So this is my story: I worked for a company that manufactures industrial grade switches for years, but I was not in a technical role. A year ago I decided to pursue my first I.T. certifications starting with Network+, then CCNA, then Security. I took a real interest in networking because for years I was talking to customers like you about the specifications of the products, but was always half-ass in knowing exactly how the devices functioned and how it impacted the plant floor, except the knowledge that customers are buying industrial grade devices because of the IP30/67 ratings. But spanning tree protocol, IGMP, redundant power input, SFP slot availability, hello?????(that was then)

    I memorized all of the specs the products came with and can rehearse them out load like today's special on a menu, but didn't know what all the fuzz is about when customers starts talking about those things I mentioned above. I guess you could be one of those guys I may have talked to in the past, then happily transferred the call to a real engineer in my company when the conversation starts getting technical. I guess I turned that feeling of embarrassment into motivation when I started pursuing my CCNA.

    So what's a JOAT? that sounds interesting.
  • DeathmageDeathmage Posts: 2,496Banned
    ITNewbie2 wrote: »
    Wow! That was a lot of things you've mentioned that I've never even realized. From the get go, I had a feeling that industrial networking is probably very different than your typical enterprise networking, but just how different is something I am dying to find out.

    So this is my story: I worked for a company that manufactures industrial grade switches for years, but I was not in a technical role. A year ago I decided to pursue my first I.T. certifications starting with Network+, then CCNA, then Security. I took a real interest in networking because for years I was talking to customers like you about the specifications of the products, but was always half-ass in knowing exactly how the devices functioned and how it impacted the plant floor, except the knowledge that customers are buying industrial grade devices because of the IP30/67 ratings. But spanning tree protocol, IGMP, redundant power input, SFP slot availability, hello?????(that was then)

    I memorized all of the specs the products came with and can rehearse them out load like today's special on a menu, but didn't know what all the fuzz is about when customers starts talking about those things I mentioned above. I guess you could be one of those guys I may have talked to in the past, then happily transferred the call to a real engineer in my company when the conversation starts getting technical. I guess I turned that feeling of embarrassment into motivation when I started pursuing my CCNA.

    So what's a JOAT? that sounds interesting.


    Industrial is very much a different animal. For me that job was interesting, it had the Industry side and then a campus building attached to it that was the Executive branch that is your typical Medium Sized Campus network, so moving from Industrial to R&S was interesting.

    Since Industrial is so much tech is so many directions I was a Jack-of-all-trade or JOAT's, so I was pressed from a helpdeks into Wintel/Networking/VMware/Storage/Wyse-Thin-Clients out my ass and on top of it all it was a 24/7 operation so I never had time off.

    Some of you think I'm insane now with my studies imagine working a 70 hour week and that being normal....

    With that being said, be careful what you wish for Industrial is a 24/7 job literally....took lots of trial-n-error for me to figure it all out.
  • ITNewbie2ITNewbie2 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Deathmage wrote: »
    Industrial is very much a different animal. For me that job was interesting, it had the Industry side and then a campus building attached to it that was the Executive branch that is your typical Medium Sized Campus network, so moving from Industrial to R&S was interesting.

    Since Industrial is so much tech is so many directions I was a Jack-of-all-trade or JOAT's, so I was pressed from a helpdeks into Wintel/Networking/VMware/Storage/Wyse-Thin-Clients out my ass and on top of it all it was a 24/7 operation so I never had time off.

    Some of you think I'm insane now with my studies imagine working a 70 hour week and that being normal....

    With that being said, be careful what you wish for Industrial is a 24/7 job literally....took lots of trial-n-error for me to figure it all out.


    I believe ya. Aside from all the craziness that seems to come from a industrial network role, I am starting to find out that this stuff isn't so much like CCNA at all.

    I am struggling to wrap my head around the concepts of Ethernet/IP, ControlNet, DeviceNet, blah blah....and I thought I was going to cruise through the subject, but no, I feel like I am learning something new all over again, like when I started my CCNA study six months ago. But I am always up for a good challenge.

    After I complete my Industrial IP advantage course, I am buying a book called Industrial Networking Basic by Gary D. Anderson on Amazon.

    Problem is I keep buying new books before I start reading the last book I bought. I have my CEH, Wireshark, Hacking for dummies books that I bought but haven't start reading. Been working on Security+ for the last 4 weeks, and now working on Industrial IP advantage. I guess this is the life of I.T. You never really stop learning.
  • vedang12Kvedang12K Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    is any one can give books of CCNA INDUSTRIAL 200-600
    or any help about it icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif
Sign In or Register to comment.