Quirky study habits

TWXTWX Member Posts: 275 ■■■□□□□□□□
Training manuals and other books for certification self-study are not exactly conducive to wakeful alertness in my experience, and many of the training videos are equally helpful in the cure for insomnia. I've discovered that I have to keep my shoes on and have to wear clothing suitable to going out in public, otherwise I'm out and the snoring starts. I've also found that I tend to study better when I'm sitting on slightly uncomfortable furniture, like the wooden dining room chairs, and when the lighting is somewhat more glaring. Basically the environment needs to be anything but soothing and restful.

Anyone else notice quirks in their study habits?

Comments

  • techfiendtechfiend Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I can't study in a quiet environment. I always need a visual distraction like TV for me to study more effectively. I think what it is if I focus for awhile strictly on the study I get sleepy, bored or a headache. I need to look away occasionally and a visual distraction provides that. I've also developed a light sensitivity and bright environments generally give me headaches.
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  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    I find it much easier to read from physical books rather than online or eBooks. There's far less potential distraction. The downside is that real books are usually more expensive, and take longer to arrive.

    It's also satisfying to see a pile of books that you have read, almost as satisfying as having actual certs.
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  • TWXTWX Member Posts: 275 ■■■□□□□□□□
    OctalDump wrote: »
    I find it much easier to read from physical books rather than online or eBooks. There's far less potential distraction.
    I'm going through the Odom CCNA 200-120 books and I find it's a mixed bag, if only because the physical books are both heavy and in grayscale, while the PDF sits on the nice balanced screen on the computer and is in full color. When I initially read the material I did it mostly on the paper books, but now that I'm reviewing to confirm the important stuff and that I didn't miss anything I find the electronic version a bit easier. The key topics in his books are highlighted in the margin in orange so they're very easy to spot as one skims the book for final review, plus if I want to copy some contents out to search on the web for more information it's faster.

    Distraction is a problem. I'm sitting at this wonderful magic box with innumerable methods to entertain me; it requires discipline to keep focused on the topic at hand.
  • davefrancodavefranco Member Posts: 12 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Background soothing music helps me to boost concentration.
  • dustervoicedustervoice Member Posts: 877 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I can only study in absolute silence i need to be able to hear a pin drop else ill be distracted
  • kiamkiam Member Posts: 18 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I prefer to study standing up, sitting down makes me sleepy after a while.
  • DeathmageDeathmage Banned Posts: 2,496
    me and my fiance both are study bees and we find way of keeps ourselves 'focused' icon_wink.gif
  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,879 ■■■■■■■■■□
    OctalDump wrote: »
    I find it much easier to read from physical books rather than online or eBooks. There's far less potential distraction. The downside is that real books are usually more expensive, and take longer to arrive.

    It's also satisfying to see a pile of books that you have read, almost as satisfying as having actual certs.

    I'm the same way. Whenever I get a book in pdf format I absolutely have to print it out because I like to hold the study material.

    I also like to listen to mp3s as I fall asleep hoping the information slips into my subconscious.

    The days leading up to an exam, I don't listen to music. The only information I want going into my brain around that time is related to the upcoming test.
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  • techfiendtechfiend Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Is this like putting a book under your pillow? i fall asleep to tv, usually a documentary, and I get what you are talking about. If I think about it I can usually come up with what I fell asleep to days ago.
    2018 AWS Solutions Architect - Associate (Apr) 2017 VCAP6-DCV Deploy (Oct) 2016 Storage+ (Jan)
    2015 Start WGU (Feb) Net+ (Feb) Sec+ (Mar) Project+ (Apr) Other WGU (Jun) CCENT (Jul) CCNA (Aug) CCNA Security (Aug) MCP 2012 (Sep) MCSA 2012 (Oct) Linux+ (Nov) Capstone/BS (Nov) VCP6-DCV (Dec) ITILF (Dec)
  • markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    My study habit is a bit weird. If I'm just reading, I have to read a little, take quick notes if needed, then jump onto my Web browser and look at something else (e.g. fantasy football), then rinse and repeat. Otherwise I get too bored and my eyes glaze over.

    Also it has to be quiet. I can study with light orchestral music but otherwise it's hard if people are talking around me. The worst is when I hear people eating/drinking.
  • QueueQueue Member Posts: 174 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I find myself constantly surrounded by white noise which helps. If I'm studying during dead time at work by the data center its like a windstorm from the HVAC. At home I have a sound machine that you would find in a doctors office also usually have a fan on.
    I find the white noise keeps you focused deep on the material at hand without any influential distraction.

    I also prefer to read at least one text book relating to the topic then various other forms whether apps, e-books, practice test, etc.
  • varelgvarelg Banned Posts: 790
    TWX wrote: »
    ... I've also found that I tend to study better when I'm sitting on slightly uncomfortable furniture, like the wooden dining room chairs, and when the lighting is somewhat more glaring.

    Anyone else notice quirks in their study habits?
    I heard and read a lot of recommendations on that type of arrangement from researchers on cognition. Brightly lit spaces and a comfortable chair.
    I like switching spaces when reading study material. Chapter 1 at home on my desk, chapter 2 in the park, chapter 3 somewhere on a hill etc. When I start generating a lot of notes I know it's time to take a break.
    I've started to create posters as of late and hanging them on the wall, instead of classic notetaking in a notebook. I'd then read my posters at least once a day. It's not only how much material you go through, but retention as well.
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