Permissions question. Am I just stupid?

darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
Trying to make this short.
Alice- permissions
ntfs-read only and full control
shared-read only and change
Answer is 'change' in my book. I thought change would not be the most restrictive.

I need a tutor lol.

Comments

  • TheProfTheProf Posts: 331Users Awaiting Email Confirmation ■■■■□□□□□□
    Not sure what your question is to be honest... Unless I am missing something?

    Are you asking about what permission would be the most restrictive? but in what context? Share permissions vs NTFS?
  • darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Yes which permission is most restrictive out of all of them. She is accessing the file over network so if I'm right both sets of permissions would apply.
  • KoreKore Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    NTFS is most restrictive. From my current experience, shared permissions would be full control and then use NTFS permissions to apply the access needed for that user.

    Hope that helps!
  • darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks still a little confused. Book makes it sound like either way, 'change' will more restrictive than 'read only'. Is this right? I have another question in the book that ends up showing change is more restrictive than read only. Still trying to see what difference between change and modify is lol.
  • KoreKore Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Read only is more restrictive. Think of change as 'Read & Write' - you can open the files, view information about the files, edit files and deleted and create new files.

    With read only you can view information about the file and open but that is it.

    In summary, read only is more restrictive that change.

    Edit: This can change however if the person has different permissions applied based on file/folder and if those permissions are set to inherited but this goes into NTFS permissions.
  • darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    I've got the Shapiro book I'm studying. Wondering if he meant to make the book this way lol. I must be missing something, almost every site I look at only lists-full, modify, read and write. I don't see change as a permission.
  • sthomassthomas Posts: 1,240Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    The most restrictive permissions always take affect. So if Alice is read only on the share permissions but has full control on NTFS permissions she will still only have read only access to the files/folder. But the share permissions only take affect when accessing the shared folder over the network from another computer. If Alice was accessing the folder locally on the workstation with the share she would have full control in this example.

    Also, perhaps "change" in the book you are talking about is supposed to mean modify?
    Working on: MCSA 2012 R2
  • darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks It helps. I just won't go by the book lol. Each question says they are accessing the files over the internet so that is not local.
  • sthomassthomas Posts: 1,240Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    It does get confusing, best practice in the real world is to set share permissions to everyone full control and then manage the permissions via NTFS permissions. That way most restrictive would be easier to figure out because you have full access to share and you can lock it down with the NTFS permissions.
    Working on: MCSA 2012 R2
  • TheProfTheProf Posts: 331Users Awaiting Email Confirmation ■■■■□□□□□□
    The most important thing to understand when dealing with permissions is to understand the impact that share permissions have vs NTFS permissions. Share permissions don't always apply unless you share something, like a folder.

    When you share a folder, the idea is to have one place where you manage all those permissions. The recommendation has always been to give full control on Share Permissions and then use NTFS permissions to control who has access to what.

    For example, you can set the share permissions for the user to FULL, meaning they have all the access to write/create/delete/modify/read, but if NTFS permissions say Read-Only, well the most restrictive permission will apply, in this case Read-Only, even though your share permissions are set to FULL CONTROL.
  • darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    The answer given in book is full control. I thought change or modify would be answer.
    You have a user named Will who has access to the Finance folder on your network server. Will belongs to the following groups;



    NTFS


    Admin
    Full Control


    Finance
    Modify





    Shared Permissions


    Admin
    Full Control


    Finance
    Change



    When Will logs into the Finance folder from his Windows 8.1 machine, what are his effective permissions?





    A.
    Full Control








    B.
    Read only








    C.
    Change








    D.
    Read and Write


  • TheFORCETheFORCE Senior Member Posts: 2,297Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    darkgnite wrote: »
    The answer given in book is full control. I thought change or modify would be answer.
    You have a user named Will who has access to the Finance folder on your network server. Will belongs to the following groups;



    NTFS


    Admin
    Full Control


    Finance
    Modify





    Shared Permissions


    Admin
    Full Control


    Finance
    Change



    When Will logs into the Finance folder from his Windows 8.1 machine, what are his effective permissions?





    A.
    Full Control








    B.
    Read only








    C.
    Change








    D.
    Read and Write



    The answer is Full control. He is in the Admin group so he inherts the permissions of the admin group.
  • darkgnitedarkgnite Posts: 7Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks. I always miss things like that. There was another that had same situation but i'll save that for a tutor if I get one. I just thought we had to permission with the most restrictions.
  • TheFORCETheFORCE Senior Member Posts: 2,297Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    darkgnite wrote: »
    Thanks. I always miss things like that. There was another that had same situation but i'll save that for a tutor if I get one. I just thought we had to permission with the most restrictions.

    No access is by default the highest restriction but if you want to give access and still have high restrictions to data you can give that user Read-only access.
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