How would you build this network?

fmitawapsfmitawaps Banned Posts: 261
As someone who is studying for their first CCNA R&S, I look at a lot of training videos and youtube videos, and read articles here and there about networking. But I can't help but feel that I am totally missing training on a variety of subjects that might be at least somewhat needed.

So here's a hypothetical situation. Let's say a small company with a need for 100 computers and 10 printers wants their networking person to identify their needs and purchase all the needed equipment to make their computer network, and install it, including Cisco IP phones. It is your job to do this. Let's say the company has two buildings. One with 70 users, and another with 30 users located 300 yards away.

At this point, I feel confident enough to select routers and switches, configure them, and get the basic network going. Vlans, spanning tree, basic port security if needed, etc.

But there's a whole lot more to it than that. Selection of servers, the server OS and everything related to it, the active directory work needed to make all the user accounts, setting up an email system, setting up disk arrays for storage and backup copies, anything to do with security, be it Cisco ASA devices or some sort of software firewall, installing programs on the servers and getting them all set up, etc..... I haven't got a clue about any of this. My initial reaction is "That is the system administrators job", as I am a networking person and don't want to be involved with that side, although it wouldn't hurt me to know something about it.

Given the above criteria, just for the networking side of things, and if the user was okay with saving a ton of money and using used equipment, here's what I would do for the networking setup:

I'd go for a cisco 2811 router with an add-in card to support extra fiber lines (sfp modules) or gigabit ethernet out to a 3750G 24 or 48 port central switch. (If the 2811 supports gigabit speed, I read conflicting descriptions online). For the main building I would have the central switch feeding to 2 more 48 port 3750G switches, possibly connected with stackwise cables, either located in the main switch cabinet or in different areas of the building, depending on its size, to connect all the computers, printers, and IP phones. For the other building located 300 yards away, I'd use an SFP module in the main switch to run a fiber line (too far to use ethernet), and an additional 3750G 48 port switch in the remote building will have enough ports to connect everything there.

Being that this is a small business, each router and switch would be on a battery backup, probably something like a few of these:

APC BR1500G Back-UPS Pro 1500 VA 10 outlets Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) - Newegg.com to power the router and each switch.

Yes, I know, a big business would have a much more elaborate generator and UPS system, I've seen them, but this exercise is for a small business. From my years in desktop support, I know enough to plug the IP phones into the ethernet line, and then install an ethernet line from the phone to the computer in each person's cubicle.

And.... that's about all I know. There's a few holes in my plan. Can you identify them and provide a more comprehensive overview? Is it right for me as a networking person to not have a clue about anything on the servers, system security, voice, email, user account, or active directory systems?

As far as wireless is concerned, I would add a few wireless access points as needed into the switches. Would a wireless network controller even be needed for a small network like this? For a bigger business I imagine I'd have to get more into the intricacies of wireless (I got a wireless CCNA course on Udemy that showed me a whole lot of things I never thought about before, watched about half of it so far).

Comments

  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 994 ■■■■■■■□□□
    How are you going to get the fiber line between the two buildings?
  • fmitawapsfmitawaps Banned Posts: 261
    Bury it underground. Or string it up on telephone poles. That's the least of my concerns, given all the other stuff that has to be done to make this network work.

    Let's presume this company rents two buildings 300 yards apart in an industrial park. So they can put in their own telephone poles if needed and not use poles already in place from the utilities.
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 2,051 ■■■■■■■■□□
    fmitawaps wrote: »
    So here's a hypothetical situation. Let's say a small company with a need for 100 computers and 10 printers wants their networking person to identify their needs and purchase all the needed equipment to make their computer network, and install it, including Cisco IP phones. It is your job to do this. Let's say the company has two buildings. One with 70 users, and another with 30 users located 300 yards away.

    At this point, I feel confident enough to select routers and switches, configure them, and get the basic network going. Vlans, spanning tree, basic port security if needed, etc.

    But there's a whole lot more to it than that. Selection of servers, the server OS and everything related to it, the active directory work needed to make all the user accounts, setting up an email system, setting up disk arrays for storage and backup copies, anything to do with security, be it Cisco ASA devices or some sort of software firewall, installing programs on the servers and getting them all set up, etc..... I haven't got a clue about any of this.

    Unless your a one man operation, you shouldn't be expected to know all the in's and out's of every device on the network. I'm sure you could set up a basic email server, AD, etc, and refine the settings over a couple of years if you were working alone. For areas you do not have a specialty in, you could hire a consult to fill in the gaps. Frankly if I was interviewing for jobs and they said you will be working alone, and be the expert on everything for the company including help desk support, I'd pass on the position. It's pretty much impossible to specialize if your supporting end users all day and managing everything else.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • PristonPriston Member Posts: 999 ■■■■□□□□□□
    For the in-between buildings if conduit didn't already exist, I'd have underground conduit installed. I'd get a roll of at least 12 strand multi-mode fiber and make 2 cable runs with it between buildings.

    For the core sadly 2811's are a little too slow now.
    http://www.cisco.com/web/partners/downloads/765/tools/quickreference/routerperformance.pdf
    Also if a company is only going to spend 20 dollars on hardware, I don't want to work there.

    If the budget was tight, I most likely wouldn't get Cisco. Since I've only worked with Cisco and I really don't feel like doing much research for this post. I'll post the Cisco gear I'd get.

    I'd have a collapsed core design.
    Core:
    2x 6506E
    with 2x WS-SUP720-3BXL, 3x WS-X6704, 1x WS-X6748-GE-TX

    Access:
    2x 6509E (One in each building/network closet)
    with 2x WS-SUP720-3BXL, 2x WS-X6704, 2-3x WS-X6748-GE-TX

    For phone systems I'd look into ShoreTel.

    For servers I'd most likely put them on their own access switch or pair of switches. The number of servers and what they are used for would effect what type of switch(s) I'd use. I also would consider using virtualization.
    A.A.S. in Networking Technologies
    A+, Network+, CCNA
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