How to pass CCNA?

techtiatechtia Posts: 144Member
Can I pass this exam with only having a couple CompTIA certs? Does this require experience or can I pass the exam with my limited knowledge and zero IT background?

Which books do you recommend, which authors?

Can I go straight for the CCNA or is it recommended to do CCENT like doing Network+ before Security+ for CompTIA?

So the CCNA is both 100-101 and 200-101 exams and even if I only pass the 101, it means I still get a CCENT? Thats cool.

Comments

  • bhcs2014bhcs2014 Posts: 103Member
    Being able to look up basic information like question 2/3 answers is pretty important in IT

    If you want to go with only 1 source I'd recommend the official cert guide books.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    The optimal 'self study route' for someone without a significant Cisco background is: Foundation Learning Guides and corresponding Lab manuals, and a home lab of 3 switches and 3 routers running at least ios 15. routers with serial links and cables for.

    If you are already working with Cisco gear regularly, I'd recommend the Official Certification Guides.

    Or google CCNA and see what you find

    Oh look at that: Exams and recommended training. Well, that answers 1 and 2.
    Oh and look a tab for "Take exam" with a link to register for the exam... which takes you to PearsonVue. I guess that answers 3.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • techtiatechtia Posts: 144Member
    Ok thanks!
  • Mike RMike R Posts: 139Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I see you earned an A+ in 2016 much as I have. I debated between the N+ and starting the CCNA and after a lot of reading here I decided to go with the CCNA route over more CompTIA. I am using the CCNA study guide by Todd Lammle and would highly recommend it to you. On top of the 20 end chapter review questions there are 3 labs per chapter also that are around 10 questions per lab. I just finished the subnetting chapter and while I won't claim to be a pro at it but I understand the concepts and can do it in a minute or so. A lot of people I think struggle with subnetting from what I've read and he does a good job explaining.

    Also if you purchase the Lammle book and email the address listed in the book you will get additional labs,packet tracer labs, and end chapter review questions.
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,535Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Many people pass CCNA with limited knowledge and experience.

    Security+ won't help you very much but Network+ adds value for somebody in your shoes. Cisco has said before that people with Network+, have a higher pass rate than those without it.

    Do the two exam path...CCENT then CCNA...do not do the one exam path because it will be much more of a challenge and is meant for those who are renewing not their first time pass.

    Start with the Official Certification Guide aka OCG.
  • techtiatechtia Posts: 144Member
    Hey thanks Mike R and TechGuru80.

    I have read reviews on Amazon and narrowed it down to Wendell Odom and Todd Lammie book, but still not sure, the 100-101 from Odom looks like it can help me pass the first part.

    Also another question, I see some people listing CCNA R&S and Security, if I pass the CCNA, which one would that be? Is there a generic one, like just CCNA general or something?
  • Mike RMike R Posts: 139Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    With the Odom book you also get a nice network simulator. I purchased both books from amazon and Lammle's IOS 15.1 command bible for a shade under $100. That covers the 100-101,200-101 and the composite exam (one test).

    Overview - Training & Certifications - Cisco the CCENT is the prerequisite exam for most of the CCNAs. Most people get the R&S first from what I have seen. I did talk to a few engineers that stressed a strong knowledge of routing and switching is essential to progress in the field.
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,535Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    techtia wrote: »
    Also another question, I see some people listing CCNA R&S and Security, if I pass the CCNA, which one would that be? Is there a generic one, like just CCNA general or something?
    If you ever see somebody say "CCNA" without anything additional...they would be referring to R&S. R&S is the standard networking path...Security is a completely different path (as is Voice, Data Center, etc.).

    Additionally, as Mike started to talk about is the need for practical command line experience. Whether that is from a simulator, GNS3, or purchasing lab equipment. I was in a similar situation at one point and frankly passing the exams without having CLI experience, passing would be very difficult if not impossible. Labbing is a major part of passing Cisco exams. You will see many people have complex home lab setups and building these out with Cisco gear can be expensive....much more expensive than a vendor neutral certification.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    techtia wrote: »
    Also another question, I see some people listing CCNA R&S and Security, if I pass the CCNA, which one would that be? Is there a generic one, like just CCNA general or something?

    A little while ago, there was just a CCNA, but as Cisco has got its fingers in more pies (voice, wireless, etc) and as networking has become more specialised (Data Center, Service Provider), they've made multiple programs with more intense focus. The CCNA R+S is the 'core' networking stuff for businesses (so called Campus Networks). It's more tightly focussed on this area. It is the spiritual successor to the generic CCNA.

    Usually when people say CCNA, they mean CCNA R+S, due to this hang over from the past. It's better to be specific, though, and say CCNA R+S or CCNA DC or CCNA Security or CCNA Industrial or whatever.

    One consequence of the increased specialisations available, is that many people choose to broaden their skills before deepening them, or do both. So it's not uncommon to see someone with CCNP R+S and a couple or more CCNAs, or a CCIE with a few CCNPs. There's a bit of overlap between the streams, both in terms of the certifications but also how it works in the real world, so this approach isn't as crazy as it might seem.

    I'd really encourage you to do some general reading about the programs and streams on the Cisco certification website. It has most of the information that you'd want, and it is useful to find out about the breadth of the program to understand where your skills might fit into the context and what it means when others have CCNA Sec or CCNA DC or CCIE Wireless or whatever.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • techtiatechtia Posts: 144Member
    Thanks to you both again.
    TechGuru80 wrote: »
    If you ever see somebody say "CCNA" without anything additional...they would be referring to R&S. R&S is the standard networking path.

    Ahh..makes sense now.
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