How to get the first job in IT and do it right?

ImNotALoserIamReallyNotImNotALoserIamReallyNot Member Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi all. I am kind of new but not really. Ok, I guess the topic explains my question. I earned a few certifications over the past few years A+,Network+ and the CCNA but I still have no real experience in IT. It isn't so much that I can't get the jobs because I can get jobs but I always feel as if I am doing a disservice to my employers and I end up leaving the job. I have done this about ten times so far. How can I get the confidence I need to get a job and feel like I am not screwing over my employer but not knowing enough? I am thinking of just forgetting about the computer field and stick to some no-brainer work, like warehousing or being a lawyer.

So I guess I want to know what the best way is to build up enough confidence to work in IT in the real world.

Comments

  • AlienAlien Member Posts: 398
    You might want to start by changing your username...then your attitude and the rest should be a piecie of cake.
    Hard times on planet earth.
  • eurotrasheurotrash Member Posts: 817
    well, study up on whatever it is that you do on the job. if you feel like you don't know enough for whatever position you're in, start learning about the technology or whatever. it can't be that hard...
    witty comment
  • keenonkeenon Member Posts: 1,922 ■■■■□□□□□□
    umm, well first off in my case i don't give a F%[email protected] icon_eek.gif about what someone is thinking about me or if i'm doing a disservice. instead i charge myself with doing the best i possibly can in everything this allows me to do far more .. it sounds to me that your lack of confidence is because someone may have "bested" you on something and you have been defeating yourself ever since.

    remember to learn knowledge is to lack it and desire it.. so you won't know everything about everything but wanting to and chasing it is the icon_idea.gif
    Become the stainless steel sharp knife in a drawer full of rusty spoons
  • ImNotALoserIamReallyNotImNotALoserIamReallyNot Member Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    _omni_ wrote:
    well, study up on whatever it is that you do on the job. if you feel like you don't know enough for whatever position you're in, start learning about the technology or whatever. it can't be that hard...

    What do you mean? That is kind of a huge area to know. Have to know all the details about PC hardware, mac hardware, know about all the various DNS server(MS, BIND) know how to administer linux, unix and windows, know active directory, know about setting up DHCP servers on MS, linux and unix, know how to program in C, C++, C#, know bash scripting, php, know various databases inside and out - mySQL, MSSQL, Oracle, DB2, know how to setup various VPNs, know the details of VPNs, know about firewalls, pix, checkpoint, blah blah know citrix, know terminal services.... know apache, know IIS... have experience with every single possible email client in existence. Know cisco routers inside and out, know juniper routers inside and out know about every single WAN technology inside and out know about every lan technology inside and out.... Know about SANs know visual basic... Know ,NET know J2EE...

    I mean how can anyone ever feel comfortable in knowing that they know enough of everything that is needed?
  • keenonkeenon Member Posts: 1,922 ■■■■□□□□□□
    find an area that you like and dare to become the best at it..

    sure i know quite a few areas different IT areas but i chose to be the best in specific areas.


    PS. Change that name as well, the first step to trying anything is believing in yourself
    Become the stainless steel sharp knife in a drawer full of rusty spoons
  • eurotrasheurotrash Member Posts: 817
    _omni_ wrote:
    well, study up on whatever it is that you do on the job. if you feel like you don't know enough for whatever position you're in, start learning about the technology or whatever. it can't be that hard...

    What do you mean? That is kind of a huge area to know. Have to know all the details about PC hardware, mac hardware, know about all the various DNS server(MS, BIND) know how to administer linux, unix and windows, know active directory, know about setting up DHCP servers on MS, linux and unix, know how to program in C, C++, C#, know bash scripting, php, know various databases inside and out - mySQL, MSSQL, Oracle, DB2, know how to setup various VPNs, know the details of VPNs, know about firewalls, pix, checkpoint, blah blah know citrix, know terminal services.... know apache, know IIS... have experience with every single possible email client in existence. Know cisco routers inside and out, know juniper routers inside and out know about every single WAN technology inside and out know about every lan technology inside and out.... Know about SANs know visual basic... Know ,NET know J2EE...

    I mean how can anyone ever feel comfortable in knowing that they know enough of everything that is needed?
    i seriously doubt that you need to know all these for your current position. just learn what you are expected to know or work with. and progress from there.
    you'll never know enough about everything.
    witty comment
  • ImNotALoserIamReallyNotImNotALoserIamReallyNot Member Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I do believe in myself.... I believe I can fail at everything I do.. lol. Ok, some of my post(s) were/was in jest and a bit exaggerated, but it was partly true. I think you may hit it on the head though and I Think I may have knew it all along. I try to know everything there is to know about everything which obviously leads to know little about nothing(kind of)
  • SieSie Member Posts: 1,195
    Unfortunatly as the other guys state i think you need to change your attitude and stop being so hard on yourself.

    If you dont know it learn as they have said, you only need as much as your job entails.

    No one here can claim to know it all and can all be taught something so dont worry. Half the fun is to find it out and conquer it. :D

    First off i think you need to conquer your negative attitude else you'll have problems in life and not just IT.

    I dont mean to be dis-respectful I have been there myself and know that before anything else gets better you have to get in the right frame of mind. Anyway before i go completely off IT, learn what you can and do you best what more can an employer ask for??
    Foolproof systems don't take into account the ingenuity of fools
  • qsubqsub Member Posts: 303
    Volunteer work?
    World Cup 2006 - Zidane - Never Forget.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Honestly, if you have a track record of leaving jobs (10 in the last few years is a HUGE number) you are eventually going to burn your last bridge and be forced to get that warehouse job. Having said that, there is nothing wrong with a job outside IT, including warehouse work, if that's what you want.

    Do this - the next IT job you get, whatever it may be, STICK with it! If you think you are doing your employer a disservice by not knowing enough, let him tell you that. He can always let you go, then you get to collect unemployment as a worst case scenario.

    It sounds to me like you have a need to know your job inside-out, top-to-bottom 100%. That can be a good attribute. So how about this - start with a small shop somewhere. Maybe that warehouse job? As you become the best warehouse guy there is by learning the simple job first, start taking on extra work. Volunteer to assist with any small computing issues - keeping the AV and OS updated, replacing the bad floppy drive, upgrading the hard drive. Then as you slowly learn (and become comfortable with) the IT environment, take on bigger chores. Help them set up automation of backups or install a secure wireless network for them. See how things can be improved and offer to do it. In a little time you become the "go to" guy for all this stuff. You will not be cheating your employer because he is paying you "laborer" wages to do IT work in addition to your other responsibilities. This should help you build the confidence you seem to need to succeed. Then, if popssible, on to bigger and better things as opportunity presents.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • strauchrstrauchr Member Posts: 528
    Your probably not really that bad. I have seen many confident people in IT who are either hopeless or not as good as they say. I suffered from a lack of confidence for quite a while because I couldn't answer every question off the top of my head, even though I should have known them from the exams I had passed.

    I have now gotten over that lack of confidence realising that some of the best peope in IT I have worked with still google stuff : )

    I also look over my resume and my certs every now and then just to remind myself of what I have achieved. That helps heaps, especially before going for interviews.
  • WebmasterWebmaster Admin Posts: 10,292 Admin
    I agree with strauchr. There's no shame in having to look up details. On the contrary actually. Good preparation is half the work. A cliché, but true. If if you do it often enough (basically everytime unless absolutely unnecessary of course), you will become better at it, and will keep learning new things faster than you can from any certification study guide. And having it looked up once, will surely make it stick longer. As long as you know 'what' you are doing (from learning concepts/theory, experience with similar technologies/products/brands), you can look up 'how' to do it (setting details, which command options to use, and which buttons to press ;)). Imo it's the research and constant learning of new things that makes IT fun. Anyway, the good preparation should give you enough confidence to do the job right.
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