Just got a job as a field tech!

Matt_SmiMatt_Smi Posts: 111Member ■■■□□□□□□□
I am very excited right now; I just got hired as a field tech for a company! Basically Dell contracts out this company and sends out techs like me to repair computers onsite for companies. The pay is decent for an entry level position, and I will be working 40 hours a week, I am only 20 and still living at home so I should be making plenty of extra cash, I also get benefits. He basically said at the start of the day I will be given locations that I need to go to and then I map out my route and do my own thing. I think that is pretty cool as I don’t mind driving and I am pretty much on my own and not sitting in an office answering phones all day. I also get paid for gas, 37 cents a mile. My car is pretty old (1995 Jeep grand Cherokee) and already has 131,000 miles on it so it will be taking a lot of abuse, but whatever it runs good. And even though its gets crappy mileage, I still make out with extra cash from the gas money.

I also should say that I got this job because I had a connection; my neighbor is in the business and gave my resume and his recommendation to a higher up in the company, I gotta grab him a case of beer and go thank him. Anyway I am really psyched because I have only been out of school and looking for work for a mouth, which really is nothing and after reading about the hard time people have finding anything here I am just very thankful I was able to get something that allows me to get my foot in the door. Anyone working as a field tech? Some insight on the position would be cool…Also I have to get Dell certified, but he said the test is really easy, anyone taken it? I am not too worried about it anyway.

Comments

  • johnnyg5646johnnyg5646 Posts: 173Member
    congratulations! Be sure to let us all know how you like it once you start :D
    BS - Computer Science
    MS - Computer Information Systems
    _________________
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Posts: 1,945Member
    Congrats and good luck.

    Mileage is currenlty $0.445, so keep track of the difference and you might be able to right it off on your taxes.
    Andy

    2017 Goals: 1 of 5 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • jescabjescab Posts: 1,321Inactive Imported Users
    CONGRATZ dude........
    GO STEELERS GO - STEELERS RULE
  • gravyjoegravyjoe Posts: 260Member
    Congratulations! That's great news. It doesn't hurt to have a connection here and there. :D
    The biggest risk in life is not taking one.
  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,473Admin Admin
    These were a few important things I realized when I was working as a computer field tech:

    1. Necessary tools like screwdrivers, wire cutters, VOMs, and service manuals are obvious. Tools like flashlights, a mirror, Sharpies, tie-wraps, a telescoping magnet (or claw), compressed air, pencil and paper, a pry bar, and a cell phone are not so obvious, but just as necessary.

    2. Make sure that you always have plenty of spare parts in your trunk. Nothing like being 50 miles from your dispatch point and realizing that you are missing a critical piece of hardware or software that you can't buy at the Radio Shack down the street. Check, double-check, and check again.

    3. Don't rely on a single map service (mapquest.com, maps.yahoo.com, etc.) for directions to a customer whom you have never visited. These services sometimes give bad directions, so compare the maps from two or three different sources.

    4. Always be familiar with the customer's service history. This includes reading service documentation and talking to other service personnel about the customer. This helps when troubleshooting new and pre-existing problems (both computer and human), and keeps you from looking like an idiot to the customer by asking too many questions. The more you know about the customer's setup and situation the more confidence the customer will have in you.

    5. Always make sure that there is someone back at the service center who can take tech support calls from you when you're in the field. Nothing like being stumped by a problem at a customer site, and you can't easily find the person back a headquarters with the answers that you need.

    6. Don't guess what a problem might be even if the customer asks you. For example, if a customer were to ask you why a machine is always running slowly, and you don't know the reason, but you speculate anyway that it may need more memory, you can bet the customer will immediately be on the phone with your boss asking why he sold them a computer that didn't have enough memory. Doh!

    7. Never say anything bad about your company, boss, equipment, other service people, other companies, or anything else in front of a customer. If the customer is being negative, just keep a smile on your face and a positive, cool attitude. Don't get trapped into an argument or making promises that you can't keep. If a customer just wants to talk about problems that don't really involve your company or service, just politely listen and don't say anything negative, even in agreement.


    There were all things that I learned on-the-job as a field tech. Even if I were told all of these bits of advice on my first day, I would have still have had to find them all out for myself. You can only gain wisdom through personal experience.
  • jim_staszjim_stasz Posts: 123Member
    JDMurray wrote:
    7. Never say anything bad about your company, boss, equipment, other service people, other companies, or anything else in front of a customer. If the customer is being negative, just keep a smile on your face and a positive, cool attitude. Don't get trapped into an argument or making promises that you can't keep. If a customer just wants to talk about problems that don't really involve your company or service, just politely listen and don't say anything negative, even in agreement.

    How right you are on this one. I did call monitoring on a help desk and you wouldn't believe what support people say, just making conversation. "Oh yeah, that breaks all the time," or, "We never have the right parts in stock." In most cases, the less you say the better.
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    Congratulations! :D

    And there's already a bunch of good advice already posted... so let me just add -- No wild parties the night before you start work/training! icon_lol.gif
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • TeKniquesTeKniques OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, CISA, SSCP, MCSE (03), Security+, Network+, A+, Project+ Posts: 1,262Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Congrats on the new job!
  • nuglobenuglobe Posts: 190Member
    I also should say that I got this job because I had a connection; my neighbor is in the business and gave my resume and his recommendation to a higher up in the company, I gotta grab him a case of beer and go thank him.

    How? You're only 20. icon_twisted.gif

    Hope it works out well for you.

    edit - hmm unless you're outside the US.
    GenshiroGuide: My blog about things I found useful. Now with videos. :)
  • matts5074matts5074 Posts: 148Member
    That's awesome. Congrats!

    We have onsite service from DELL on about 500 computers and the techs are very laid back and friendly.
  • Kevin.SmithKevin.Smith Posts: 33Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm not old enough either. icon_cry.gif Besides, I'm getting a security clearence :) . Keep up the good work. Yeah dell techs are pretty cool. I have to call them when our hardware craps out icon_wink.gif
    WIP: A+ Essentials
  • Ricka182Ricka182 Posts: 3,359Member
    congrats! I've been doing field service for a couple years, it's not that bad....after a while, just watch the road rage......
    i remain, he who remains to be....
  • porengoporengo Posts: 343Member
    JDMurray wrote:
    These were a few important things I realized when I was working as a computer field tech:

    1. Necessary tools like screwdrivers, wire cutters, VOMs, and service manuals are obvious. Tools like flashlights, a mirror, Sharpies, tie-wraps, a telescoping magnet (or claw), compressed air, pencil and paper, a pry bar, and a cell phone are not so obvious, but just as necessary.

    2. Make sure that you always have plenty of spare parts in your trunk. Nothing like being 50 miles from your dispatch point and realizing that you are missing a critical piece of hardware or software that you can't buy at the Radio Shack down the street. Check, double-check, and check again.

    3. Don't rely on a single map service (mapquest.com, maps.yahoo.com, etc.) for directions to a customer whom you have never visited. These services sometimes give bad directions, so compare the maps from two or three different sources.

    4. Always be familiar with the customer's service history. This includes reading service documentation and talking to other service personnel about the customer. This helps when troubleshooting new and pre-existing problems (both computer and human), and keeps you from looking like an idiot to the customer by asking too many questions. The more you know about the customer's setup and situation the more confidence the customer will have in you.

    5. Always make sure that there is someone back at the service center who can take tech support calls from you when you're in the field. Nothing like being stumped by a problem at a customer site, and you can't easily find the person back a headquarters with the answers that you need.

    6. Don't guess what a problem might be even if the customer asks you. For example, if a customer were to ask you why a machine is always running slowly, and you don't know the reason, but you speculate anyway that it may need more memory, you can bet the customer will immediately be on the phone with your boss asking why he sold them a computer that didn't have enough memory. Doh!

    7. Never say anything bad about your company, boss, equipment, other service people, other companies, or anything else in front of a customer. If the customer is being negative, just keep a smile on your face and a positive, cool attitude. Don't get trapped into an argument or making promises that you can't keep. If a customer just wants to talk about problems that don't really involve your company or service, just politely listen and don't say anything negative, even in agreement.


    There were all things that I learned on-the-job as a field tech. Even if I were told all of these bits of advice on my first day, I would have still have had to find them all out for myself. You can only gain wisdom through personal experience.

    Just a few more tips.

    8. If you're new to the job and a customer asks how long you've been doing it (and they always seem to ask on your very first day), just relate to the customer that you've been doing it for a little less than a year. This way you're not lying to them, and you don't make them nervous because you're new to the job.

    9. There may be times when you are sent to a "critical customer" or a customer who is not exactly pleased with the company you work for. When you walk through the door the customer doesn't see you as an individual...they see you as a representative of your company. When they start "losing it" on you, just relate to them that you understand their concerns and are there to resolve their issues.

    10. Do not have sex with a customer! I've been in many situations where a customer has come on really strong to me. Just keep it professional...and keep it in your pants. Well...unless she's a Playboy Playmate...you'll always have a great story to tell at the unemployment office. icon_wink.gif

    11. If you're going to see a customer after lunch...stay away from foods that will ruin your breath or make you gassy! Need I say more? icon_redface.gif
  • skully93skully93 Posts: 321Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    My last permanent job involved a lot of travel and similar type stuff, and there were pros and cons.

    however, it's a great opportunity for you, and you will learn A TON.

    Congrats and good luck!
    I do not have a psychiatrist and I do not want one, for the simple reason that if he listened to me long enough, he might become disturbed.

    -- James Thurber
  • Matt_SmiMatt_Smi Posts: 111Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the advice guys, and BTW I am located in the US, in Mass…
  • porengo wrote:
    10. Do not have sex with a customer! I've been in many situations where a customer has come on really strong to me. Just keep it professional...and keep it in your pants. Well...unless she's a Playboy Playmate...you'll always have a great story to tell at the unemployment office. icon_wink.gif

    Dude he aint kidding, this kind of thing really does come up! But yeah! Welcome to the field tech club!
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