RHCSA or Linux Foundations?

FayzFayz Posts: 118Member ■■■□□□□□□□
Which certification is in demand more, RHCSA or Linux Foundations Certified SysAdmin? I have seen the RHCSA in some job ads but not the Linux Foundations Certified System Administrator offered by Linux Foundations. Is this something the Linux Foundation recently created? Any real difference in subject topics and ROI?

Comments

  • doctorlexusdoctorlexus Posts: 217Member
    I'm not familiar with Linux Foundations, but I do hear a lot of people recommend RHCSA over Linux+.
  • FayzFayz Posts: 118Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm not familiar with Linux Foundations, but I do hear a lot of people recommend RHCSA over Linux+.

    Linux foundations is a non profit that is "dedicated to fostering the growth of Linux." I know Linux+ is from CompTIA, but many people seem to not know that this Linux Foundations offers certification exams.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    It's The Linux Foundation, so a serious organisation with about as much credibility as you can have in the Linux world. The entry certification is Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator, and there is also Linux Foundation Certified Engineer. These are fairly recent. I think there have been previous attempts by similar organisations, but this looks like it could stick. The certification has some kudos since they recently teamed with Microsoft for the MCSA Linux on Azure. It seems like a good option alongside Red Hat's offerings and the LPIC.

    It's performance based like the RHCSA, but gives the option of CentOS, openSUSE or Ubuntu. Which might make in more attractive to people who are more familiar with Ubuntu or SUSE.

    It might take a little while for it to get the same name recognition as RHCE. I think that if it is developed, it could supplant LPIC entirely and perhaps be a real rival to Red Hat's certifications.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy SABSA, GCFA, GPEN, CISM, RHCE, Security+, Server+, eJPT, CCNA Posts: 4,036Mod Mod
    I would say RHCSA, a well recognised Lab based exam. But don't stop there, go for RHCE as well.
    Goal: MBA, August 2020
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    +1 for RHCSA and RHCE as they are the two most recognized Linux certifications in the industry. Its roughly the same price as to take the LFCS and LFCE so why spend money on relatively unknown certifications?
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    Linux foundations is for someone who has no clue what Linux is, how to use it.... and wants to learn the basics of the OS.
    Linux+ is from CompTia and is from LPIC-1. Passing the Linux+ gives you 3 certs instead of 1. But the ROI is minimal
    Red Hat is the Linux Industry standard of linux certs and is often the first linux cert that is attained instead of the foundation and Linux+

    To answer your question RHCSA has more of a ROI then the foundations and Linux+. I was actually going to sit for the linux+ but after looking at jobs and job postings I decided to drop Linux+ and get my RHCSA. More of a ROI, more in depth learning, and overall more in depth knowledge.
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • mgmguy1mgmguy1 Senior Member PA Posts: 463Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I recently listened to a podcast of Packet Pushers about Verizon openstack and how are they partnering with Red Hat. It was a really interesting podcast but the take away I took was that Verizon is going to be working a-lot with Red Hat. Folks with Red Hat Certification will be well positioned to work for them or any carrier who is using Red Hat's OpenStack service. On the job board in my area, CCNA.MCSE,MCSA or "linux certified" is what I see on job descriptions. A-lot of people on this site stress getting some type of Linux skills weather it be with Red Hat or Comptia Linux +. Either one or both makes you more marketable.
    "A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

    Fats Domino
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    mgmguy1 wrote: »
    A-lot of people on this site stress getting some type of Linux skills weather it be with Red Hat or Comptia Linux +. Either one or both makes you more marketable.

    Right. The only issue I see is RedHat is more marketable then Linux+. And since verizon is partnering with redhat people that are RHCSA, RHCE, RHCA certified will be more apt to get the job rather then someone with Linux+. I only say that because with Linux+ you are learning Linux but 3 different versions of Linux... and not all the commands are the same. Linux is Linux but I would rather study a Industry standard then a copycat.
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • doctorlexusdoctorlexus Posts: 217Member
    The one issue I see with the Red Hat certifications is cost, not just to obtain, but to keep them current. A single exam is $400, and if you want to renew, you're going to have to take another $400 exam. When you get up in the RHCA area, I believe exam costs go up to $600/each.

    Comparing Linux+ to RHCSA, they're both roughly the same price to obtain. But RHCSA costs a lot more to keep in the long run.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    ITSpectre wrote: »
    Linux foundations is for someone who has no clue what Linux is, how to use it.... and wants to learn the basics of the OS.

    What is Linux foundations?
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,475Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    @ ITSpectre. Is RHCE to Linux as CCNP is to Networking?

    BTW never under the stood the point of getting a certification saying hey look at me I am a noob.
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    OctalDump wrote: »
    What is Linux foundations?

    Linux Foundations Website: The Linux Foundation

    Check it out!
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • wolfinsheepsclothingwolfinsheepsclothing Posts: 155Member
    RHSCA/RHCE, as mentioned, are ubiquitous. I can't speak to Linux Foundations, but Linux+ was also mentioned in this thread. The only reason I obtained Linux+ was for an obscure project that wanted it. RHCE >>> Linux+ (in difficulty/desirability/requisite knowledge)
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    @doctorlexus - sure RHCSA does cost $400 and RHCE $400 as well. Lets stick with those since most people will never make it to RHCA. Every 3 years you fork out $400 if you want to stay current, by taking the RHCSA if you're already and RHCSA or the RHCE if you're already RHCE. For the return on investment, its definitely worth to at least get certified to RHCSA and RHCE initially even if you don't intend to renew them. After working in the field long enough to get both, you don't need to prove your Linux skills. Linux + is entry level and yes right now its a lifetime cert but you know what CompTIA does with those...

    @Databasehead - RHCE is the second step in the Red Hat OS certification ladder. Comparing RHCE and CCNP is comparing apples to oranges. Also, most advanced certifications require you to start with the bottom rung certification.
  • wd40wd40 CISA, eJPT, MCP, MCTS, CompTIA x 6 Posts: 988Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    @ ITSpectre. Is RHCE to Linux as CCNP is to Networking?

    BTW never under the stood the point of getting a certification saying hey look at me I am a noob.
    Do you know that there are no prerequisites for taking CCIE exams? you don't need to be a noob CCNA or a CCNP to become a CCIE!

    But still people study for CCNA.

    The point is for many jobs you just need to prove that you know enough about the subject to do normal day to day activities, if the need an expert they will ask for higher certifications and grill you in the interview.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,475Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    I never realized the CCNA was a noob certification. Most of the networking engineers I work with have their CCNA and I hardly consider them noobs.
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    @ ITSpectre. Is RHCE to Linux as CCNP is to Networking?

    BTW never under the stood the point of getting a certification saying hey look at me I am a noob.

    I will break it down like this.... maybe I worded it wrong or came across harsh....

    For people that are just getting into IT and really are just getting their feet wet many of us do not recommend someone take the RHCSA, CCNA, CCNP, CASP, CISSP etc... you have to learn to crawl before you can walk... nobody is a noob, but we all have to start somewhere. So for someone who is new to linux and has never used a Linux machine before we would recommend him/her take the Linux Foundations class... or register on linux academy first to get their feet wet. If you did not know how to swim would you jump in the deep end of the pool?

    For every track or certification there is always one that trumps the other. But its not about trumping someone. It is about learning the material and going for the certs that YOU are interested in.

    CCNA is not a noob certification. People that have the CCNA some of them start out with NET+ then get a CCNA or they may get the CCENT then get the CCNA...
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    ITSpectre wrote: »
    Linux Foundations Website: The Linux Foundation

    Check it out!

    Yes, but the OP seems to be talking about Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin. I thought maybe Linux Foundations was some other certification.

    LFCS is roughly comparable to RHCSA in terms of difficulty and as a hands on exam it probably better than Linux+ for quantifying practicals skills. Like the RHCSA, there is a more advanced exam: the LFCE. These exams are cheaper than Red Hat (at least in this part of the world), and are offered online with proctoring, so more accessible.

    The only downside here is that RHCE has far more name recognition at the moment. If you're not sure why you are getting a Linux certification, then RHCE is the one to get.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    OctalDump wrote: »
    Yes, but the OP seems to be talking about Linux Foundation Certified Sysadmin. I thought maybe Linux Foundations was some other certification.

    LFCS is roughly comparable to RHCSA in terms of difficulty and as a hands on exam it probably better than Linux+ for quantifying practicals skills. Like the RHCSA, there is a more advanced exam: the LFCE. These exams are cheaper than Red Hat (at least in this part of the world), and are offered online with proctoring, so more accessible.

    The only downside here is that RHCE has far more name recognition at the moment. If you're not sure why you are getting a Linux certification, then RHCE is the one to get.

    But you have to get the RHCSA before the RHCE
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • gkcagkca Posts: 243Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Comparing Linux+ to RHCSA, they're both roughly the same price to obtain. But RHCSA costs a lot more to keep in the long run.
    There's no point to compare a multiple choice test with a practical one, getting a Linux+ certifies that you know how to answer the test questions, getting a RHCSA certifies that you know how to apply practical skills.
    Getting a Linux+ won't help you to get job, getting an RHCSA might.
    So in the long run you're more likely to make enough money to more than cover the costs of getting and staying certified taking the RHCSA/RHCE route rather than Linux+.
    HTH
    "I needed a password with eight characters so I picked Snow White and the Seven Dwarves." (c) Nick Helm
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    OctalDump wrote: »
    If you're not sure why you are getting a Linux certification, then RHCE is the one to get.

    Or make sure Linux is what you want to pursue. I mean who gets a certification and they are not sure why they are getting it?
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
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