Are ANSI accrediated certifications the way to go?

[Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■■□□□□□
So a basic question but one that I think needs to be answered. Are ANSI accredited certifications the way to go? I'm seeing a lot of jobs online with the certifications required as the ones listed on the ANSI accredited list like CISSP and GPEN and CCNA etc. Any thoughts? My reasoning for this is because I don't want to chase filler certifications that don't hold any value in the industry or to employers who are hiring for positions.
2019: CCNA Security,CTIA,JNCDA,GREM
2020: CISSP,CWNA,CWSP,CWDP,CBP,(Blockchain Training Alliance Certifications)
2021: LPIC-2,eLearnSecurity Courses

Comments

  • OctalDumpOctalDump Posts: 1,722Member
    Well, I don't think it's such a big deal. Most of the majors didn't find it hard to tweak their existing set ups to comply with ANSI/ISO/IEC 17024. The big exception is Microsoft, who doesn't care what anyone thinks, and they are big enough to get away with it. It seems not all the Cisco programs are accredited either, and EC-Council only seems to have CEH.

    Also notably missing are the performance based Linux Foundation, Red Hat, Offensive Security and eLearnSecurity. I'm not sure if that means that it is too difficult to create performance based testing that can be accredited, or just that no one has tried yet.

    I suspect that some that do have ANSI compliance still aren't necessarily worthwhile. It's more a case of "some good certifications are ANSI compliant" rather than "all ANSI compliant certifications are good".
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • PJ_SneakersPJ_Sneakers CompTIA, EC-Council, ISACA, (ISC)², Microsoft USAPosts: 879Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    Only 4 CompTIA certs are ANSI compliant, but that doesn't make the Linux+ any less valuable. And like OctalDump said, look at Microsoft. Plenty of hits on Indeed for MS certs.
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