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Frustrated and moving into a new direction

mgmguy1mgmguy1 Member Posts: 485 ■■■■□□□□□□
I'm stuck in a job I am not happy at. I'm well respected at my job, considered dependable and nobody gives me grief about call time metrics because everyone knows I work hard. All promotional opportunities at my company are in Florida and I don't want to move there .I have been on a series of job interviews over the past 2 months and I'm not getting anywhere. I'm applying for Junior NOC or Junior System Admin jobs and I keep not getting the position because I have zero experience in Active Directory, Microsoft SQL server or Windows 2012 or Firewalls. I have my CCENT and a nice home lab for Cisco certifications up to CCNP. After much discussion with my wife I have decided to go to a local community college and get my Microsoft MCSA. I start my first class in late September and am really looking forward to the experience. Once I have my MSCA in 2012 I will finish ICND 2 and have my full CCNA

Is anybody else running into this issue in there area of world. Employers looking for more System Admin guys vs Network guys ?
Your feedback is appreciated

mgmguy1
"A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

Fats Domino

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    Kuvuli21Kuvuli21 Member Posts: 50 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I ended up becoming the entire IT department myself. Some companies would rather pay one guy a good salary and work the **** out of him. As opposed to others. It truly varies from person, to employer and company. Don't stress it. Keep progressing and you'll get what you want man. I'm doing MS cents too now. So I know how you feel.

    Shoot me a PM if I can help in any way! Btw. I'd love a Florida job lol. I'm in Atlanta right now....traffic hell...
    Currently studying: 70-680 Windows 7: Configuring

    2017-2018 goals: 70-685, Server 2012, CWNP, SSCP and/or CCNA.
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    TechytachTechytach Member Posts: 140
    Yeah. I am finding way more sys admin jobs where they want MCSA vs CCNA. Very few NOC jobs. But most of all they want years of experience. Most don't even ask for certs. Just want a huge laundry list with years of experience doing X Y Z.

    Additionally (I could be wrong) I get the feeling many of them are one man shows (like mark's thread) with a lot of extra stress attached.
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    markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Do you have a preference on Sysadmin vs Networking? The MCSA is 3 exams whereas you only have one more exam for your CCNA. Either one should get you recognition.
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    sillymcnastysillymcnasty Member Posts: 254 ■■■□□□□□□□
    This is actually why I started a thread in another forum, asking for educational resources on AD and Group Policy. I do see this in very many applications, as well as virtualization. Even if the ad says for network guys. So they really do want a swiss army knife type person.

    And yes, I'm not having much luck either because I don't know AD or Windows Server 2012. Although I set up a VirtualBox VM and got the free version of Server 2012 Datacenter, and am using Lynda tutorials. Hopefully it will help me learn enough to confidently put it on my resume.
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    TechGromitTechGromit Member Posts: 2,156 ■■■■■■■■■□
    mgmguy1 wrote: »
    After much discussion with my wife I have decided to go to a local community college and get my Microsoft MCSA. I start my first class in late September and am really looking forward to the experience. Once I have my MSCA in 2012 I will finish ICND 2 and have my full CCNA

    Honestly I think those boot camps are a waste of $. I see them all the time, College course to get an A+, only $3,000 plus lab fees. I passed mine by buying a $30 book, reading / studying it for a weekend taking the exam. Now I realize not everyone is like me, and needs the class structure to learn, but my suggestion is at least try to get books and self study. If you bomb the exam, THEN take a college course or boot camp. I think far too many people see the easy way out. I have taken boot camps in the past, but it was on my employer's dime, if available why not utilize the benefit.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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    CIOCIO Member Posts: 151
    Like the others have said, it depends on the company. I've notice that jobs at large companies requires you to do one thing only compare to smaller shops where they want you to wear many hats. I hope this helps depending on your ultimate goal in the field.
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    TechGromitTechGromit Member Posts: 2,156 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Kuvuli21 wrote: »
    I ended up becoming the entire IT department myself. Some companies would rather pay one guy a good salary and work the **** out of him.

    You need to set boundaries with your employer, if you allow them they will be more than happy to work you to death. I would let them know you realize that at times, occasionally overtime is a necessity evil in IT, but 60 hours Plus every week isn't going to fly with you. This is tougher to pull off without some good experience behind you, but you have to give some push back or you'll suffer. 60k a year sounds like a good salary, but if your working 70 hours a week, it's barely more than $16 hour.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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    636-555-3226636-555-3226 Member Posts: 975 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Looking for experience in Active Directory, Microsoft SQL server, Windows 2012, & Firewalls?

    You can download free trials of Server 2012 to install AD & SQL server on. At that point there are a million online videos to show you how to do everything in each. Amazon has plenty of books to walk you through the 101/201 level for each. You do NOT need to attend a college course, just spend an hour a night before bed to slowly churn through them.

    Firewall experience is a tad tricker. If they're looking for vendor-specific experience then you'll be more limited. Otherwise there are quite a few free Linux-based firewall ISOs/VMs/Apps you can install and play with to learn how they work, what they do, etc.

    For the basic stuff like that nowadays the world is your oyster. All the free resources are there, you just need to get them in order & spend some time with them
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    MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 Member Posts: 899 ■■■■■□□□□□
    TechGromit wrote: »
    Honestly I think those boot camps are a waste of $. I see them all the time, College course to get an A+, only $3,000 plus lab fees. I passed mine by buying a $30 book, reading / studying it for a weekend taking the exam. Now I realize not everyone is like me, and needs the class structure to learn, but my suggestion is at least try to get books and self study. If you bomb the exam, THEN take a college course or boot camp. I think far too many people see the easy way out. I have taken boot camps in the past, but it was on my employer's dime, if available why not utilize the benefit.

    To be fair, the MCSA is CONSIDERABLY more difficult than the A+. Just getting a $30 book will only get you a failure on the MCSA exams. But, most of the information out there is cheap, or free. Technet, MVA, Online videos from Pluralsight. All of those together can and will help a person pass. I personally wouldn't pay for a class for this type of exam either, I self studied for several months before I got my MCSA in server 2012.
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    volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 1,057 ■■■■■■■■□□
    markulous wrote: »
    Do you have a preference on Sysadmin vs Networking? The MCSA is 3 exams whereas you only have one more exam for your CCNA. Either one should get you recognition.

    BAM!

    I have to agree. I think the CCNA will be your quickest way to a Return-on-Investment. (you already have the ccent)
    And with "packet tracer" and the "youtubes".... you really have Zero reason Not to achieve it :]

    Although, not sure what State/Market you live in.....


    The MCSA 2012 is also cool;
    but do you want to be a Server guy??
    (only you can answer this)

    Microsoft has FREE evals; just go sign up for them- Good for 120 days (then you have to reinstall, i believe)
    Go buy some cheap $50 desktops off ebay, and go crazy.
    Google/bing for --> Microsoft Virtual Academy.
    GREAT material. Dive in!!

    How much do you HATE your job?
    If you hate it a LOT... then go get your CCNA first.
    My guess is that, SUDDENLY, you will land a jr/noc gig.

    But maybe a jr/noc position is too much of a Pay-cut??

    If so... then maybe stay with your job, and pursue the MCSA instead.

    It's really up to you.
    instead of trying to figure out what "the market" wants.... figure out what YOU want.

    ps,
    ignore the SQL server.
    Unless you have a background in databases.... it's no reason to start learning now.
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    DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Member Posts: 2,753 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Didn't make it past this "call time metrics". Good luck on your wise decision. Whatever it maybe, like I said didn't read the rest but totally understand.
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    mgmguy1mgmguy1 Member Posts: 485 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Thank you all for your responses. I woke up this morning and signed for up the MCSA class at Delaware County Community college. Everybody has there own opinion on how to educate themselves.This decision of going to a community college may not be a popular preferred method of learning but I am giving this a shot. @Marklous, I would like to experience a role as a System Administrator to see what that's like. There are very few Junior Noc or Full on NOC jobs in my area. Lots of System Administration jobs thou requiring different levels of experience along with WAN/LAN knowledge. There are Cisco Networking Engineer jobs in my area but they want 5-7 years of experience and list of required skill sets that my current job does not let me get experience in. Hopefully getting my MCSA will open some doors for me.
    "A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

    Fats Domino
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    volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 1,057 ■■■■■■■■□□
    mgmguy1 wrote: »
    I woke up this morning and signed for up the MCSA class at Delaware County Community college. Everybody has there own opinion on how to educate themselves.This decision of going to a community college may not be a popular preferred method of learning but I am giving this a shot.

    In terms of I.T., i think getting an associates from a community college is a great alternative. The costs associated with the traditional University path have spiraled out of control.

    Just make sure the CC you attend has a worthwhile program...
    Good Luck!
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