When to let certifications expire

MitMMitM Member Posts: 622 ■■■■□□□□□□
This is something I've been debating, so wanted to throw it out there to see what others decide to do.

Just a little about me...I've been with my employer for about 12 years now. I'm currently by title a sr network solutions analyst, handling lan/wan, firewalls, load balancers, telecom, security. Prior to this role, I was sr server solutions analyst handling windows servers/server + desktop virtualization/ms exchange. My current focus for my next role (somewhere) is on network security.

That being said, my VCP expires December 1. For those who don't know, the cost to renew is $225 for 2 years. I don't work with VMware on my day-to-day anymore. I will be setting up/supporting a BE 6000 on UCS servers and that will run ESXi, but other than that, my job no longer requires it. I'm having a hard time deciding whether I should renew or let it go. My main goal right now is to complete the CCNP Security, I have 3 more exams to go. From there, I'd like to work on CISSP

Normally, my employer will pay for passed exams, but not sure about VCP, since it's not work related anymore.

I'm wondering how you all handle similar situations.

Comments

  • chrisonechrisone Senior Member Member Posts: 2,132 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Ask yourself if you need it when finding a new job. That should answer your question.
    Certs: CISSP, OSCP, CRTP, eCPPT, eCIR, LFCS, CEH, AZ-900, VHL:Advanced+, Retired Cisco CCNP/SP/DP
    2020 Goals:
    Courses: VHL (completed), CQURE: Windows Security Crash Course (completed), BlackHills InfoSec: Breaching the Cloud (completed), eLearnSecurity: WAPTv3 (completed), IHRP (completed), THPv2 (completed), PTXv2 (in-progress)
    Certs: VHL: Advanced+ (completed), OSCP (completed), AZ-500 (failed 1st attempt), eLearnSecurity: eWPT (failed 2x, no further attempts), eLearnSecurity: eCIR (complete), eLearnSecurity: eCTHPv2 (report: awaiting results), eLearnSecurity: eCPTXv2 (Late-Nov)
  • MitMMitM Member Posts: 622 ■■■■□□□□□□
    chrisone wrote: »
    Ask yourself if you need it when finding a new job. That should answer your question.

    I did think about that, but the reality is you never know what you'll need for finding a new job. I've been leaning towards letting it go, as I can always get it again.
  • ErtazErtaz Member Posts: 934 ■■■■■□□□□□
    MitM wrote: »
    I did think about that, but the reality is you never know what you'll need for finding a new job. I've been leaning towards letting it go, as I can always get it again.

    You're 100% right. It's like cash. It's true that you can always get it again, but will you have it in your pocket when you need it?
  • NotHackingYouNotHackingYou Member Posts: 1,460 ■■■■■■■■□□
    IMO, let them expire when they are no longer relevant to your experience level or if there's a drastic role change. For example, at your level of experience, I wouldn't consider maintaining Network+ to be a relevant certification.
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
  • MitMMitM Member Posts: 622 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Ertaz wrote: »
    You're 100% right. It's like cash. It's true that you can always get it again, but will you have it in your pocket when you need it?

    A valid point. I think I'll always have a good knowledge of the technology though, which should help.
    IMO, let them expire when they are no longer relevant to your experience level or if there's a drastic role change. For example, at your level of experience, I wouldn't consider maintaining Network+ to be a relevant certification.

    This is exactly how I've been looking at it. The only reason why I'm somewhat considering renewing it is because VMware requires you to take an official class for over $3000 to get certified again, once it expires. Now that they have a network virtualization cert, I have a way around it.
  • NotHackingYouNotHackingYou Member Posts: 1,460 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Sorry, I should have been more specific. IMO the VCP is relevant to your level of experience.
    When you go the extra mile, there's no traffic.
  • gespensterngespenstern Member Posts: 1,243 ■■■■■■■□□□
    When to let certifications expire

    when they are CEH
  • alias454alias454 Member Posts: 648
    Depending on the effort required by you to renew it for another two years and the relevance of the cert going forward should lead you to the right decision. IMHO, renew it this time and reassess in another year and a half. The renewal is cheap @ $225 but if you have to take the class again then not so much.
    “I do not seek answers, but rather to understand the question.”
  • MitMMitM Member Posts: 622 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Sorry, I should have been more specific. IMO the VCP is relevant to your level of experience.

    Ahhh, I got it now. I thought you meant since I'm no longer working on it, it's not relevant haha

    @alias, I'd say not too much effort from a technology point of view, but you never know the little things they will ask on exams. Technically, since I have the CCNP certification, I can go the VCP-NV route without taking a class. Pass that and then I can take the VCP-DCV exam. I don't have any hands-on NSX experience though, so that becomes another challenge

    I'll have to really think about this some more
  • mbarrettmbarrett Member Posts: 397 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Are you still working with the product? Do you think there's a chance you will work with it again? Is the product still relevant in the market?
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, CSM, MS Access 2016, 2019 Member Posts: 2,584 ■■■■■■■■■□
    That being said, my VCP expires December 1. For those who don't know, the cost to renew is $225 for 2 years. I don't work with VMware on my day-to-day anymore. I will be setting up/supporting a BE 6000 on UCS servers and that will run ESXi, but other than that, my job no longer requires it. I'm having a hard time deciding whether I should renew or let it go. My main goal right now is to complete the CCNP Security, I have 3 more exams to go. From there, I'd like to work on CISSP

    That's a tough one, just to be safe I would probably re up it at least once. If 2 years goes by and it wasn't needed then let it roll off. Don't lose focus, stick to your main goal complete that CCNP Security. Which IMO is completely BOSS! (Sorry for the 80's expression) icon_redface.gif
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, CSM, MS Access 2016, 2019 Member Posts: 2,584 ■■■■■■■■■□
    when they are CEH

    But so many security jobs are listing this certification as a requirement or a nice to have. Thoughts?
  • markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    chrisone wrote: »
    Ask yourself if you need it when finding a new job. That should answer your question.

    Pretty much my thoughts. I've got quite a few certs and there aren't many that I'll bother renewing.
  • fitzlopezfitzlopez PCIP,CCNA CyberOps,CySA+,Pentest+,Linux+, CSSLP,CISSP-ISSMP,CISM,CEH,ITIL F,Cobit F,ISO27K F Member Posts: 96 ■■■□□□□□□□
    If it's not a big hit on your budget I'd renew it. It's still relevant for your current job and if you ever need to find another one it'll make your resume pass some more filters. CCNP Security looks good, I'll put it on the list for 2018.

    But so many security jobs are listing this certification as a requirement or a nice to have. Thoughts?

    I won't let my CEH expire but my recommendation at work for the new guys is to not take it anymore. We're reworking job description requirements to phase it off. Depending on the role I'm suggesting other certs like the CSX-P. When I took the CISSP I realized that the CEH was just an OK entry level cert. The new versions haven't changed my mind.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Teradata Assc 16, CSM, MS Access 2016, 2019 Member Posts: 2,584 ■■■■■■■■■□
    @Fitz - Interesting take....

    I work for a large corporation and when I go out to the internal job boards I notice CISSP and CEH almost always come up for security roles. Analyst, Senior Analyst and Engineer Roles. The engineer roles require infrastructure knowledge with preferable networking certifications.
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 947 ■■■■■■■□□□
    MitM wrote: »
    Technically, since I have the CCNP certification, I can go the VCP-NV route without taking a class. Pass that and then I can take the VCP-DCV exam. I don't have any hands-on NSX experience though, so that becomes another challenge

    Well Technically...
    since you are ALREADY a VCP.... you can go take the VCP-NV exam riGhT nOw (no Bootcamp required).
    And of course, passing that exam would also Renew your VCP-DCV.

    But you are correct,
    even if you let it go... VMWARE occasionally offers a gimmick where anyone with a current CCNA can take two exams to become a VCP-NV (again, with No bootcamp).
    And once you are a VCP, then you can go recertify your VCP-DCV (again, with No bootcamps).

    So...... it's really no big deal.
    Maybe go try the NV exam just for kicks!

    Personally, i think VMware is going the way of RIM.
    Their licensing/cost model is a Joke, M$ is (practically) giving away Hyper-V or free, and i'm not sure many companies think "VMware" when they think of "the Cloud" (AWS, Azure, have more mindshare).

    just my opinion...
  • winona_ryderwinona_ryder Member Posts: 42 ■□□□□□□□□□
    i let my CEH expire as I have been working that sector for a while now - the experience far outweighs the letters on the CV
  • dontstopdontstop Member Posts: 579 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Are there some certificates which even expired hold merit on your CV? I mean, if you've attained a CCNA or Sec+ do you really need to keep renewing them if you're doing relevant work? Would it not get to the point where your spending more time just renewing certifications then expanding your knowledge?
Sign In or Register to comment.