LX0-103 how much time

pinkiaiiipinkiaiii Posts: 216Member
Now i know many ask same question and no two people are the same,experience on some,learning concepts for others etc.

Now im quite good to pickup windows stuff and can do basics with linux -mostly navigate,some file editing getting packages ,network info.

But still cant fully spin my head around filesystems like different directories,managing different users/privileges,pulling out data,how file system is managed partitions,boot sequences,superblocks and different parameters flags when hitting such topics is a bit of a kick in the nuts when spent over two decades on windows.

as now stands i have 3 months to prepare for exam,but given its December,honestly want to take edge off and relax for holiday season.come Jan plan on putting 2-3h daily which would amount to ~120h in two months.

Also few months back finished college and one of the subjects was lpic 101-102 basically scrapped trough putting few hours every week to score above 40 % on both tests,but it was more like guessing and logical thinking rulling out incorrect answers in many cases more then actually knowing material,just to get pass on course since was busy with other more time consuming materials that would required much more time back then.

so amounts taken to prepare and previous experience or just knowledge of other how much time they put in would be welcome.thx

Comments

  • si20si20 Senior Member Posts: 471Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Personally, I found the LX0-103 to be rather difficult. The biggest difficulty was remembering switches for different commands. Unless you have a photographic memory, it's no easy feat. Personally, I studied for around 3 months in total (over a period of 6 months on and off). I was somewhat familiar with Linux but I only managed a 540/800 exam score. The exam is unforgiving - answers are very similar and can easily throw you if you don't know EXACTLY what the answer is. 3 months with 3 hours per day should be enough imho.
  • lucky0977lucky0977 Posts: 175Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    3 months is very doable. I'm starting to study for this as well and it seems overwhelming right now but i'm in sure in 3 months i'll know a heck of a lot more than I do today. From reading other passed threads, it looks as though the hardest part will be trying to memorize what each switch does per command. It will have to be a repetitive action in which you constantly go into the "man" page for a particular command and continually type it over and over again. Knowing what a command does is easy, the hard part is trying to remember what each switch does.
    I've only read the first 100 pages of this book and it seems to be pretty good https://goo.gl/3QqNJ6.
    Bachelor of Science: Computer Science | Hawaii Pacific University
    CISSP | CISM
  • pinkiaiiipinkiaiii Posts: 216Member
    well still have access to my lpic and linux fundamentals materials,compared to compTia v3 book its a bit easier read booring none the less thou.

    just find it a lot harder since would of imagined entry exam being more introduction,but the way its put down its almost every command and common flags parameters,and can see why many mention 104 being easier since it focuses more directly on each topic.

    since gathered 100hours would be enough but might need to rethink that since from other posters who switched over seems 500+ score is quite common to just barely get over the hump.
  • Andy from SactownAndy from Sactown Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    This is going to vary wildly from person to person as we all learn and retain differently, test differently, have different life & study schedules and varied levels of prior experience.

    Coming from an albeit dated, but fairly experienced background I needed 60 hours of preparation for LX0-103 and roughly 80 hours for LX0-104. Does this count the thousands of hours I've spent over the many, many years I've been exposed to Linux systems? No. Was that all applicable? Nope. Did it help? Yep.
    cd /pub; more beer
  • ConquererspledgeConquererspledge Posts: 9Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    A good rule of thumb is associating an option with a keyword identifying the option. For example, ls. -a lists all files in a directory. A=all. You'll find that -a will mean all for a lot of commands. Same with r or R for recursive. -i for interactive and so forth. Also" while you are studying, take time to examine the man pages for each command you come across.
  • lucky0977lucky0977 Posts: 175Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Anyone know if syntax is going to be an issue? For instance, is we were asked a question and we had to type out a location for a command, you could do it two different ways. 1st method { cd /etc/fonts/ } and 2nd method { cd etc/fonts }.
    Bachelor of Science: Computer Science | Hawaii Pacific University
    CISSP | CISM
  • Andy from SactownAndy from Sactown Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    lucky0977 wrote: »
    Anyone know if syntax is going to be an issue? For instance, is we were asked a question and we had to type out a location for a command, you could do it two different ways. 1st method { cd /etc/fonts/ } and 2nd method { cd etc/fonts }.

    Well, that's not really syntax, but I 'undermeant what you stood (tm)'. There weren't any questions that were write-in that required a command with it's entire path. I had questions that asked for a specific file, and questions that asked for a specific path, but not the whole kit'n'kabbodle. They are all case-sensitive. If it asked for the X Server configuration directory path it would expect /etc/X11/, etc/X11 isn't just bad (as in your example) it's just plain wrong. Likewise, if it asked for the X configuration file; xf86config is wrong. You only get points for XF86Config. I just wouldn't expect a question that asked for both at the same time, ala /etc/X11/XF86Config .

    It will also give you very clear directions as to how to form your response. As in, "do not include path, command is case sensitive."
    cd /pub; more beer
  • pinkiaiiipinkiaiii Posts: 216Member
    there was a good share of questions on lpic chapter exams like one example below,also it had quite few to pick options like -n -N etc. but hardest ones were always where few options would be cramped together as difference as mentioned could be only single symbol /"* etc that makes it either correct or wrong.
    Also does anyone know if studying lpic 101 and lpic fundamentals would have same topics covered,since English isn't my first language and comTIA description on many symbols/commands is quite poor.

    CORRECT
    - See section 8.4.4The command echo "text" > file.txt will not overwrite file.txt if it already exists.
    • False

    CORRECT - See section 8.4.4The command echo "text" >> file.txt will not overwrite file.txt if it already exists.
    • True
  • espi_251espi_251 Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Well, that's not really syntax, but I 'undermeant what you stood (tm)'. There weren't any questions that were write-in that required a command with it's entire path. I had questions that asked for a specific file, and questions that asked for a specific path, but not the whole kit'n'kabbodle. They are all case-sensitive. If it asked for the X Server configuration directory path it would expect /etc/X11/, etc/X11 isn't just bad (as in your example) it's just plain wrong. Likewise, if it asked for the X configuration file; xf86config is wrong. You only get points for XF86Config. I just wouldn't expect a question that asked for both at the same time, ala /etc/X11/XF86Config .

    It will also give you very clear directions as to how to form your response. As in, "do not include path, command is case sensitive."

    X server and its configuration files are part of LX-104 and I'm not sure whether you are right or not, but the books I'm reading states the X Server's configuration file is xorg.conf which is in /etc/X11/. Could anyone confirm his answer please? I can't even recall seeing the X86Config on exam objectives or in any of the books I've read.
  • espi_251espi_251 Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    lucky0977 wrote: »
    Anyone know if syntax is going to be an issue? For instance, is we were asked a question and we had to type out a location for a command, you could do it two different ways. 1st method { cd /etc/fonts/ } and 2nd method { cd etc/fonts }.

    lucky, the lx-103 is not an easy exam especially if you have no experience with Linux. The questions I struggled with were the one asking for multiple (2-3) answers for a question. I would recommend you reading this book (CompTIA Linux+ / LPIC-1 Cert Guide Ross Brunson (Author), Sean Walberg (Author)) as it was extremely helpful to me in passing this exam.

    Good Luck!
  • Andy from SactownAndy from Sactown Posts: 17Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    espi_251 wrote: »
    X server and its configuration files are part of LX-104 and I'm not sure whether you are right or not, but the books I'm reading states the X Server's configuration file is xorg.conf which is in /etc/X11/. Could anyone confirm his answer please? I can't even recall seeing the X86Config on exam objectives or in any of the books I've read.

    Yeah, it's xorg.conf now. Used to be XF86Config in the way back machine (tm). Was just using as an example of answers being case-sensitive and the exam asking for commands/files or paths, but not both on one question.
    cd /pub; more beer
  • hal9k2hal9k2 Posts: 77Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Hey

    Speaking of my experience. I barely passed this exam after a month of learning, and I started with knowledge about how to move around in Linux CLI.

    This exam is all about commands and switches to this commands. So if you are good in memorizing stuff, then 3 months are more than enough, even to long as you can forget what you have learned at beginning :)

    Go get an ebook mentioned few posts above. CompTIA Linux+ / LPIC-1 Cert Guide Ross Brunson ,Sean Walberg

    Also, set up some VMs, play around in them while reading ebook.
  • pinkiaiiipinkiaiii Posts: 216Member
    Yeah, it's xorg.conf now. Used to be XF86Config in the way back machine (tm). Was just using as an example of answers being case-sensitive and the exam asking for commands/files or paths, but not both on one question.

    good answer,but this one what i call logical since xf86 would indicate 32bit system,and in this day and age its becoming distinct be it desktop or server memory is cheap,thus no real use for 86 bit systems
Sign In or Register to comment.