How do I learn windows inside and out?

Raymond MasonRaymond Mason Member Posts: 74 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi! You know, I want to learn how to completely master the latest Windows operating systems. I don't want to get certified but I do want to learn how to eventually repair and solve complex issues related to Windows. Problem is when I googled on how to go about this there wasn't a lot of information on that.

I want to give free tech support down the line. To me its more of a hobby then a career, I know it seems silly but I believe I would enjoy it so much more as a hobby then as a career.

Comments

  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    If you want to give free support, you could start that right now. Jump onto one of the tech forums where people post questions, look for questions that you might be able to answer, and research the answer and then post it. Research enough questions, and you will soon become more and more familiar.

    There's also a tonne of books out there that start from "A complete idiot's dummy guide to beginning" through to graduate level texts, academic papers, technical papers etc that go into the minutiae of the most arcane parts of Windows. Find you level, and interest, and start reading.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • Raymond MasonRaymond Mason Member Posts: 74 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you for your response. :)

    I learned some things about windows, like kernel mode, user mode, what threads and pages are, how virtual and physical memory work together ect.

    I believe I am just below a novice. Is there any books in particular order I should read? I just don't want to jump into more advanced books when I am not ready for it. Know what I mean? :D
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    Possibly one of the A+ certification guides would cover the basics well. You can skip the bits you don't like. Mike Meyers has good reviews.

    There are certification guides for the Microsoft exams, but they are designed with an enterprise focus, so will likely include a lot of things which aren't relevant.

    Technet is a good resource for more detailed technical documentation. It might also be of interest to you to sign up to Microsoft Developer Network, since you get access to more of the under the hood info.

    Upgrading and Repairing PCs by Scott Mueller (I think 22nd edition is the current), is good for hardware.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • mbarrettmbarrett Member Posts: 397 ■■■□□□□□□□
    How much money do you want to spend? There are plenty of online resources, some are pay, some not. The ones that are not usually require a little more diligence & knowing what you're after. You could start with something like CBT Nuggets, or even look on Youtube. And, the Microsoft site itself can be a good resource.
  • Raymond MasonRaymond Mason Member Posts: 74 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you so much guys!
    mbarrett wrote: »
    How much money do you want to spend? There are plenty of online resources, some are pay, some not. The ones that are not usually require a little more diligence & knowing what you're after. You could start with something like CBT Nuggets, or even look on Youtube. And, the Microsoft site itself can be a good resource.

    I am keeping paid options opened. There is just so much to the Windows ios that its mind boggling. I found some book series like, windows internals, troubleshooting with the windows sysinternals tools and Windows sysinternals administrators reference.
  • PJ_SneakersPJ_Sneakers CompTIA, EC-Council, ISACA, (ISC)², Microsoft USAMember Posts: 880 ■■■■■■□□□□
    This Professor Messer class will probably help get you in the right direction. It's Windows 7, but still very applicable.
    Professor Messer's Free Microsoft 70-680 Certification Training | Professor Messer IT Certification Training Courses
  • PC509PC509 CISSP, CEH, CCNA: Security/CyberOps, Sec+, CHFI, A+, Proj+, Server+, MCITP Win7, Vista, MCP Server 2 Oregon, USMember Posts: 801 ■■■■■■□□□□
    The Windows Internals series is good. Also, keep checking out forums (https://www.sysnative.com/forums/ is good), etc.. The more work you do with Windows, the more you'll learn.
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