Installed Ubuntu on my laptop and now its running slow in Ubuntu.

grave_diggergrave_digger Member Posts: 127
Here's some picture for you guys to make things clear about my computer's specs.
I'm not sure why it's running so slow. I installed it without connecting to the Internet. I wanted to download the updates after installation.








Seems like my Laptop should be able to handle the OS.

I used AOMEI as the software to partition the HDD.
1776 is the answer to 1984!

Comments

  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    Probably because you installed it on an NTFS partition. Try blowing away the partition and leaving it as raw space, then reinstall Ubuntu using that newly unallocated space.
  • FillAwfulFillAwful Member Posts: 119 ■■■□□□□□□□
    If you want Ubuntu installed side by side with Windows there should be pretty straight forward options in the install menu. If it is still unclear look for a guide online to dual boot Ubuntu and Windows.

    I willing to bet that you manually created the partitions and the problem here is that the Ubuntu installation has no swap file. Without a swap partition the installation will be gruelingly slow.
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    FillAwful wrote: »
    If you want Ubuntu installed side by side with Windows there should be pretty straight forward options in the install menu. If it is still unclear look for a guide online to dual boot Ubuntu and Windows.

    I willing to bet that you manually created the partitions and the problem here is that the Ubuntu installation has no swap file. Without a swap partition the installation will be gruelingly slow.

    It definitely has something to do with his "pre-partitioning with AOMEI". You are right in that Ubuntu has an install on top of Windows option (I've used it in the past), but I highly doubt it has to do with the SWAP partition since that really doesn't affect performance (due to the large amounts of RAM current computers have, including this one), only when low priority processes need to be moved from RAM temporarily. The biggest risk with having no SWAP space is the OOM (out of memory) killer, which does a PID walk to see which process is not being used and kills them. I know this because I manage a number of Linux servers that do not have SWAP space (no I did not build them) that provide DNS and DHCP to thousands of users, yet have no performance problems.
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Yeah doubt its anything to do with swap. If you're using a lot of swap with 16GB you're doing a lot of work. Also check your graphics drivers and you're not running in software rendering mode.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • FillAwfulFillAwful Member Posts: 119 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Verities wrote: »
    It definitely has something to do with his "pre-partitioning with AOMEI". You are right in that Ubuntu has an install on top of Windows option (I've used it in the past), but I highly doubt it has to do with the SWAP partition since that really doesn't affect performance (due to the large amounts of RAM current computers have, including this one), only when low priority processes need to be moved from RAM temporarily. The biggest risk with having no SWAP space is the OOM (out of memory) killer, which does a PID walk to see which process is not being used and kills them. I know this because I manage a number of Linux servers that do not have SWAP space (no I did not build them) that provide DNS and DHCP to thousands of users, yet have no performance problems.

    Yes, I agree with you. TBH I didn't look at the attached specs. My own experience involves installing Linux on older PC's. I also agree with your initial assessment, using the pre-partitioner likely created an NTFS file system rather than a more appropriate ext#.
  • si20si20 Member Posts: 523 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yep, re-install using EXT4. I didn't even know Linux could be installed on an NTFS drive and i've got the Linux+ icon_redface.gif EXT4 is the way to go!
  • grave_diggergrave_digger Member Posts: 127
    Don't want to start another thread but now that I restarted the computer I got a GRUB rescue> screen.



    I looked up some YT vids to try to figure this out. Btw I'm glad I backed up my whole HDD now with these issues arising.

    anyway can I just delete the Ubuntu files and go back to my backup?
    1776 is the answer to 1984!
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    Can you reboot back into Windows? From there I would blow away the Ubuntu partition and start over.
  • grave_diggergrave_digger Member Posts: 127
    Verities wrote: »
    Can you reboot back into Windows? From there I would blow away the Ubuntu partition and start over.

    No. Goes in Grub recovery mode. So then I placed the live cd back in and restarted it and managed to get back to Windows like that. I went into my partitioning program and deleted. The 75gb partition that was NTFS and then turn off the computer. I restarted the computer and once again I'm in Grub recovery mode.
    1776 is the answer to 1984!
  • hiddenknight821hiddenknight821 Member Posts: 1,209 ■■■■■■□□□□
    To be honest, your partitioning software made this rather complicated. If I recall correctly, MBR table shouldn't have more than 4 primary partitions. Not sure if your partitioning software's logical-partition-aware.

    EDIT: I made my statement based off your first snapshot.
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    No. Goes in Grub recovery mode. So then I placed the live cd back in and restarted it and managed to get back to Windows like that. I went into my partitioning program and deleted. The 75gb partition that was NTFS and then turn off the computer. I restarted the computer and once again I'm in Grub recovery mode.

    So it sounds like you might want to fix your boot order in the BIOS since GRUB is being kicked off, then looking for the Ubuntu kernel which is no longer there. Kind of nitpicking here, but your Ubuntu partition was originally 9 GB (from your HDD pic) and you said you removed a 75 GB partition......did you make changes in between your posts? Also, I agree with HiddenKnight; don't use 3rd party software to manage partitions. Since you're on Windows, I believe there's a program called Disk Management, that comes with the OS, where you can manage partitions.
  • yoba222yoba222 Senior Member Member Posts: 1,221 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Once the bootloader is sorted out. . .
    If I'm interpreting your screen shots correctly, you have/had Ubuntu on only a ~9GB partition. That is really skimpy. I'd go with more like 20-25GB. There's a good chance of filling up that partition completely on the first big installation of updates or a few weeks down the road from kernel updates.
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  • grave_diggergrave_digger Member Posts: 127
    I want to remove the GRUB now....ugh
    1776 is the answer to 1984!
  • grave_diggergrave_digger Member Posts: 127
    my laptop heats up ridiculously now and GRUB STILL appears after deleting the partition.
    1776 is the answer to 1984!
  • hiddenknight821hiddenknight821 Member Posts: 1,209 ■■■■■■□□□□
    The "overheating" has nothing to do with the corrupting or missing partitions. Probably have to do with the missing drivers in the OS you were using or one of the fans died. I had the heating issue when I don't have the necessary driver for the nvidia ION since I was using an incompatible OS version on my ASUS Eee PC 1015PN, which comes with dual graphic chips, but not meant to be used simultaneously. Without the driver, it'd overheat and kill the battery faster since both chips were running natively. Your mileage may vary.


    If you are still stuck on the same problem in the original post, then here's what I think you should do next. I can't help but noticed that your G:\ and E:\ drives contain the manufacturer recovery tools for your convenience. Many of us here with at least A+ knowledge usually know how to nuke the whole disk and reinstall Windows from scratch using a Windows image. Are you able to do the same? All you really need is the exact version of Windows (i.e. Windows 7 Pro SP1) image on a USB, and use the Windows key printed somewhere on your laptop (which most reputable computer manufacturers do). If you don't know how to perform this, then don't bother with the Ubuntu installation. You'd be wasting your time as the struggle would be too painful and cumbersome without getting the A+ basics down. And of course... always back up your data before making any change.


    UPDATE: Here is the link to download the Windows image directly from Microsoft.
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