Can someone please help me in understanding this?

JipinJipin Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
I'm currently studying for my CCNA certification and am trying to figure out IPV6
The textbook i'm using has a lab for the manual and stateful autoconfiguration and has a diagram where there are 5 routers (a to e). Routers A and B are connected to one interface Fa0/0 on router C and routers D and E are connected to another interface fa0/1 on router C. I want to know is it really possible for multiple routers to be connected to the same interface on a different router? If yes, how? I'm using CISCO packet tracer and it really isn't letting me do this.
Can someone please help me out here?

Comments

  • clarsonclarson Member Posts: 903 ■■■■□□□□□□
    if there is an implied switch in between the routers, then lots of routers could be attached together.

    But, why would you want to have 3 routers connected to the same network. That is a bit over redundant.

    Being your dealing with a diagram related to dhcp, I'd guess some of those should be switches and endpoints.
  • JipinJipin Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Here is the diagram that I have. open?id=0B4qUGN0I5xcCZ1RfS1RlejdaYms

    Can you please tell me how am I supposed to go about creating a network similar to that on packet tracer?
  • rob42rob42 Member Posts: 423
    Jipin wrote: »
    Here is the diagram that I have.

    Where is...?
    No longer an active member
  • Uriah7Uriah7 Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
    You need a switch in order to connect Router A and Router B to the "same interface" on router C, but it is also important to notice that this is the same thing as connecting Router B and Router C to the "same interface" on Router A, and the same thing as connecting Router C and Router A to the "same interface" on Router B. I agree with Clarson that there is an implied switch in-between Router A, B and Router C.

    To do this in Packet Tracer, drag 3 routers to your workspace. Drag a switch into your workspace. Place straight through cables from Router A, B, C, D and D to any interfaces on the switch. That is it. Assign IPV6 addresses to the interfaces of the routers as you are being taught. I hope this helps a bit.
  • JipinJipin Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
  • dontstopdontstop Member Posts: 579 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Jipin wrote: »
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4qUGN0I5xcCZ1RfS1RlejdaYms/view

    The diagram is here! And there are no switches in this icon_sad.gif


    That style of diagram you posted actually represents an Ethernet Network Bus (See the Diagram [0] I linked: First Row 1st & 3rd Diagram). It's just an easy way to draw a diagram without having to add all the extra details. It's safe to assume that (A/B/C on fa0/0) connect to SwitchA and (C fa0/1 D & E on fa0/0) connect to another switch, say SwitchB like in [1].

    [0] https://www.edrawsoft.com/solutions/shapes/basic-network.png
    [1] Imgur: The most awesome images on the Internet
  • rob42rob42 Member Posts: 423
    As the op's have said, the switches are 'implied'. In case you've not figured it out yet (and I'm sure you have), your topology in CPT will look something like this...

    top.PNG 12.1K
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  • Ltat42aLtat42a Member Posts: 587 ■■■□□□□□□□
    You can get all of the Hands-on-labs (and more) from lammle.com. Register for free account, sign in, go to Forum Full Archives, "Preconfigured hands on troubleshooting labs". It has that lab you are referring to.
  • Uriah7Uriah7 Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Jipin wrote: »
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B4qUGN0I5xcCZ1RfS1RlejdaYms/view

    The diagram is here! And there are no switches in this icon_sad.gif

    Well, there are switches. Yes, they are invisible, but there is at least one switch implied by that diagram. Not sure what else to say on this. I can build it in CPT of you would like.
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 1,046 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Jipin wrote: »
    I want to know is it really possible for multiple routers to be connected to the same interface on a different router? If yes, how? I'm using CISCO packet tracer and it really isn't letting me do this.
    Can someone please help me out here?

    I'm gonna have to Nitpick on this one;
    this is an extremely, lazy diagram.

    I have to call BullCrap on the "implied switch" explanation.

    How do y'all know that there isn't a HUB in use? I say this is an "implied hub" scenario.
    Prove me wrong.

    Long story short:
    If you are going to write a book covering introductory networking.... then you can't skip steps.
    Not including [implied] switches/hubs in the diagram is bad technique.
  • clarsonclarson Member Posts: 903 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Yes they could be using a hub. Or, any number of devices with switch like properties. But, the exam is routing and switching. Not, routing and hubs. So, it makes sense to call it a switch when it is implied that there is a device with switch like properties.

    and, I'm pretty sure on the exam if they asked "what is the best answer for what the implied device is". It isn't hub.
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