Value adding: CISSP vs CCNA + CCNA Security

boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Posts: 378Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hello all,

I am making a final decision on weather to take the Networking with security emphasis or Cyber security expert WGU degree program.

My question is in the job market what adds more value the CISSP or CCNA/Security???

How much networking does a security expert perform in day to day task?

Thanks.
Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.

Comments

  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb They are watching you Posts: 3,133Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Of course it is going to depend on the role, but in most roles your not configuring routers or switches. Depending on the role you might be responsible for setting up firewalls... The network folks take care of that at my place though. You'll want a good understanding of how networks are setup though and the CCNAs give you that. A basic understanding.

    Are those CCNAs needed for most security roles? No.
    Are they good knowledge to have? Yes.
    Will a CISSP give you better ROI? Most likely

    What I did was I got my CCENT, failed the CCNA: R&S, passed the CCNA:Sec. Right now have zero plans on finishing the R&S and currently studying for the CISSP.
  • E Double UE Double U Posts: 1,477Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    CISSP > CCNA Security on the job market.

    My path was CCNA Security -> CCNP Security -> CISSP

    How much networking you will do just depends on the job.
    CISSP, CISM, CISA, GPEN, GCIA, GCIH, CEH, etc

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Posts: 2,197Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Just to clarify, you don't get the CISSP with any of those programs. Don't pick your entire degree plan based on one certification anyway.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Posts: 378Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Good point. The ISC2 is part of the CISSP path though isn't it?
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,508Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    They offer the SSCP and CCSP, from ISC2. If you don't have the necessary minimum time in their required domains, you will become an Associate of ISC2.
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

    Connect With Me || My Blog Site || Follow Me
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Posts: 378Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    So really what we are looking at is the Cyber Security bachelor's is more for someone with a few years of experience in the field???

    It's really not as easy as it seems to figure out.
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Posts: 2,197Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Security in general is for people with years in the field. The IT one is an IT degree with a small concentration in security, the new cybersecurity one is more focused.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb They are watching you Posts: 3,133Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    So really what we are looking at is the Cyber Security bachelor's is more for someone with a few years of experience in the field???

    It's really not as easy as it seems to figure out.


    Actually, that is exactly what WGU is meant for...

    [h=3]Who the Program is For:[/h]
    • Established IT professionals seeking a bachelor's degree and certifications needed to advance their careers and become cybersecurity and information assurance experts.
  • packetphilterpacketphilter Posts: 85Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    What I did was I got my CCENT, failed the CCNA: R&S, passed the CCNA:Sec.

    I've read CCNA Sec is harder than CCNA R&S. Would you disagree, or did you study harder for CCNA Sec?
  • kMastaFlashkMastaFlash Posts: 1,012Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Ummmm. That should be easy, CISSP!!! So many more job postings look at CISSP!! Not to say CCNA Security isn't good either, but if you want a bigger bang for your buck and a better ROI, CISSP is your friend. That said though, CISSP is harder then the CCNA Security. They also require that you have your CCENT as a prereq before starting the CCNA Security. If you don't have your CCENT as a minimum, you can't take the CCNA Security unless you have the CCNA R&S or something higher.
    2018: CCSK
    2019: CWSP,Cloud+,Project+,CASP,PenTest+,CWNA,CCNA Security,GXPN,GREM
    2021: LPIC-2,JNCIS-ENT,eLearnSecurity Courses
  • ande0255ande0255 Posts: 1,178Banned
    In looking at the full blueprint of the CCNA R/S in its current form, that covers a lot of network security measures itself, I believe the CCNA Sec now delves more into firewall technologies (thank thy lord finally!) which in my opinion would give you a strong network and network security skill set.

    I haven't looked over the CISSP, though I've heard it's "domains" of implementing security on a human level, physical level, etc, and has a bit of a pre-req in working in security roles for years.

    However it sounds a lot like ITIL, which I've always thought is more like Management / Incident Manager crap which I'd hate to do, rather than actual network tech / engineer work.

    Googling just a quick glance of the concepts it appears to be a lot of what I said (managing) different domains of IT, is that correct?
    Back in my day we used to route packets on 56k lines, through the snow, uphill both ways.

    https://loopedback.com
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,535Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Like anything "it depends." In general, if you have the experience to be fully endorsed than a CISSP will get you a higher paying job and more opportunities. Most good networking jobs want at minimum a CCNP, so your CCNA jobs aren't going to compete salary wise with a mid level (5 years) security job. Honestly though, if you can have both it helps with exposure and to set yourself apart.

    Unless we are talking about a Network Security Engineer, you will do little or no networking day-to-day because other roles include compliance / forensics / SOC monitoring...and so on. The actual R&S type stuff is left up to IT. If you want exposure to a little of everything, smaller companies are your best bet, but at large companies each role is in a silo.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb They are watching you Posts: 3,133Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I've read CCNA Sec is harder than CCNA R&S. Would you disagree, or did you study harder for CCNA Sec?

    I think the CCNA:Sec just covered a lot more security aspects I'm familiar with. Also, I only got one sim on the exam and it was stupid easy.
  • ande0255ande0255 Posts: 1,178Banned
    The blueprint right now is so much different from when I took it, the version I took a monkey could have pass for a bundle of bananas, it was just so worthless it was absurd to even have it as a Cisco endorsed exam.

    Its amazing to see the change in technologies on it now like SSL VPN, ASDM, 802.1X, and even Cisco Firepower.

    Those are topics that will greatly help you get into an network role pretty quick if you can demonstrate a knowledge of those technologies, as the internet turns into a less secure place every day!
    Back in my day we used to route packets on 56k lines, through the snow, uphill both ways.

    https://loopedback.com
Sign In or Register to comment.