Work rant

CiscoASA2202CiscoASA2202 Member Posts: 51 ■□□□□□□□□□
Ever been in a situation where the info passed down/confirmed to you is actually incorrect and than you're in a situation where the client believes you gave out some wrong info.

Of-course you don't get on a call and say this or that dept provided the wrong info, and try to pass off the blame so what do you do? These days it seems like you just never trust the info you're getting from someone else is 100% correct so hold your tongue and get the info verified other ways.. icon_rolleyes.gificon_rolleyes.gif

Comments

  • PhalanxPhalanx I have many leatherbound books... United KingdomMember Posts: 331 ■■■□□□□□□□
    If I'm given anything that I can't verify myself, I will always hand it over as information "from a coleague". I will always try to confirm it myself where possible first.

    If you have been given incorrect information and taken the blame in the customer's eyes, I would suggest taking it up internally rather than trying to fix things with the customer. As long as it's not a consistent issue, then the problem will resolve over time as trust is rebuilt. Go to your manager and explain the whole situation, pointing out the perception it has given the customer.
    Client & Security: Microsoft 365 Modern Desktop Administrator Associate | MCSE: Mobility
    Server & Networking: MCSA: Windows Server 2016 | MTA: Networking Fundamentals
    Data Privacy & Project/Service Management: PECB GDPR DPO/Practitioner | ITIL 2011: Foundation | CompTIA Project+
    Currently Studying: Microsoft 365 Enterprise Administrator Expert
  • PhalanxPhalanx I have many leatherbound books... United KingdomMember Posts: 331 ■■■□□□□□□□
    The whole principle of "Don't Trust Anybody" is a bad mindset to have in a team environment. If you don't trust your team, then you're not going to survive very long. If there's a problem, learn from it and change the system. Make sure it doesn't repeat. But otherwise, people are human.

    I have no problem if someone makes a mistake, as long as they learn from it. If they keep making the same mistake, then we have a real problem.
    Client & Security: Microsoft 365 Modern Desktop Administrator Associate | MCSE: Mobility
    Server & Networking: MCSA: Windows Server 2016 | MTA: Networking Fundamentals
    Data Privacy & Project/Service Management: PECB GDPR DPO/Practitioner | ITIL 2011: Foundation | CompTIA Project+
    Currently Studying: Microsoft 365 Enterprise Administrator Expert
  • p@r0tuXus[email protected] Member Posts: 532 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Communication is a fundamental concept that underlies much of computing and IT in general. Ironically, there are many IT people that get engrossed in the logic behind computing and lose those soft-skills, if they ever had them. I find it best to immediately address misunderstanding in attempt to control the scenario and re-instill trust and establish authority. For me, it's about managing expectations and ensuring a path forward. Again, communication comes into play by putting notice upward to team leads, managers, directors, etc. when something needs to be addressed internally and disemminated downward to ensure operational conformity and consistency in service/product. Alot of people let their feelings and lack of soft-skills get in the way of realizing it's business.
    Completed: ITIL-F, A+, S+, CCENT, CCNA R|S
    In Progress: Linux+/LPIC-1, Python, Bash
    Upcoming: eJPT, C|EH, CSA+, CCNA-Sec, PA-ACE
  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Member Posts: 1,179 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I used to work with a person who intentionally trained me to do the wrong procedure and then gave me bad information on several clients, I guess to make me look bad. Once I figured out what was going on, I talked to the boss, who of course did nothing. Then I made sure to verify everything she told me after that. And of course, I told all of our co-workers what happened and told them to watch out for her. Glad I don't work there anymore.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,772 Mod
    OR people that have been on a contract forever and even though there are work instructions, there are a few things left out and so, if you do the WI wrong, you get blamed for something that wasn't even in the work instruction. Glad I don't work there anymore.
    In my present environment, team lead is very cool and he encourages everyone to work together. Like what he said today in a meeting , I picked you guys for a reason..
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • CiscoASA2202CiscoASA2202 Member Posts: 51 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Or how about when you've been handed documentation/instructions on something. Than you hand that off to others and they talk **** about your documentation which you provided but you really can't say you received that shitty documentation/instruction from someone else which put you on the wrong path in the first place. Makes you look bad right guys, but you know what you pick up the pieces and keep going forward. icon_redface.gif
  • jcundiffjcundiff Member Posts: 486 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Phalanx wrote: »
    The whole principle of "Don't Trust Anybody" is a bad mindset to have in a team environment. If you don't trust your team, then you're not going to survive very long. If there's a problem, learn from it and change the system. Make sure it doesn't repeat. But otherwise, people are human.

    I have no problem if someone makes a mistake, as long as they learn from it. If they keep making the same mistake, then we have a real problem.

    Trust, but verify... ALWAYS
    "Hard Work Beats Talent When Talent Doesn't Work Hard" - Tim Notke
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