Legal Ramifications for KeyLogger

Daneil3144Daneil3144 Member Posts: 152 ■■■□□□□□□□
Offered to assist someone off Facebook for malware/driver related issues.

So, when I get the laptop, the wife stated that she thinks her husband messed up the laptop trying to hide things and hide his tracks. (as he won't give her his passwords)

None of this was mentioned originally.

She wants to know while fixing it, is there a way I could get his passwords.
Key Loggers instantly came to mind - as I've used them in my youth.

What are the legal ramifications for putting this on a latptop that they share and directing it to her e-mail? Or should I just direct her to where it can be installed?

Comments

  • PhalanxPhalanx I have many leatherbound books... United KingdomMember Posts: 331 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would suggest you do neither.
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  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,781 Mod
    Run away..FAST.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,917 Mod
    Scaredoftests beat me to the same exact comment I was going to make. This is a people/trust issue, not a technology one.
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,306 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Run, don't walk, away, just hand the laptop back first.
  • knownheroknownhero Member Posts: 450
    You'd be up a certain creek without a paddle if the husband found out he was being logged. Run, run as fast as you can from this
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  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Wiretapping, hacking and invasion of privacy all come to mind. Do not engage in any activity with this person. Also, one also might make an argument that she has no right to provide the laptop to you without his permission (given she does not have the password and it sounds like he doesn't wish her to have access to the device).
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  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 991 ■■■■■■■□□□
    I wouldn’t touch that laptop with a 10’ pole.
  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Member Posts: 1,179 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I would also be suspicious of a random Facebook "friend" asking you for such information.
  • EnderWigginEnderWiggin Member Posts: 551 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Definitely illegal. Source: Electronics Communications Privacy Act.

    Definitely immoral. Source: Common sense.
  • beadsbeads Senior Member Member Posts: 1,520 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Add to potentially investigating without a license (Private Investigator or Eye). Really, this woman may be very well intentioned or baiting you to make the biggest mistake of your life if your not careful.

    Even remote-ware with given permissions, in writing, etc will not be enough to give you legal cover. Worse case scenario is that the husband is caught and decides to take you out with him. Never get between husband and wife unless your a cop.

    Walk away, friend. Just walk away.

    - b/eads
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,280 Mod
    This has CRAZY written all over it. RUN.
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