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dontstopdontstop Posts: 578Member ■■■■□□□□□□
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  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    dontstop wrote: »
    I'm starting to think I'd be better to take the year off and study for my CCNP than spending that time in a NOC as most of the jobs I'd like to get are now asking for CCNP for their junior roles.

    First off, horrible idea. Experience is the most important factor for becoming a network engineer. Do both at the same time like most people.


    Since you've got some systems side skills already I'd look for a role that is more of a jack of all trades where you can get some networking responsibilities. Play those up on your resume and then try to move into pure networking role next. You might be able to bypass the lower levels of NOC and support that way.

    Good luck!
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • IronmanXIronmanX Posts: 323Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Experience is the most important factor for becoming a network engineer. Do both at the same time like most people.

    Agree.

    Your in a certification forum so there will be bias towards getting those certs. However I think everyone can agree having experience is what is most important.
    The certs are good for getting you in the door to get that experience.

    Are you currently employed? Can you express interest to you boss to involve you in some of the network related work?
  • Danielh22185Danielh22185 Posts: 1,195Member
    So if I read this right you are in a user-facing support role and are trying to break into networking? I.E you have a CCNA and some network knowledge from that but are trying to get a job in the industry to gain relevant experience?

    If I am correct I would not set the bar so high trying to seek out unicorns. Get the experience wherever possible.

    I started in IT as help desk working for a large company taking 30 calls a day. I did that for about 2 years and got my CCNA in the process. After getting my CCNA I applied for like 300 jobs and had a few bite and one ultimately took a chance on me and offer me a job. It was for an entry level NOC but words couldn't explain how excited I was to finally get that real-world networking experience. Through 5 years I made several moves into higher tier roles for that same NOC until eventually landing with their top team. While there I soaked up everything I possibly could and got my CCNP in the process of being there.

    At the current, my work now accredites me with the title: Sr. Network Engineer. Although I don't feel very "senior" right now. My dedication to getting in the trenches to learn as much as I possibly could literally paid off. I still have a long way to go too.


    So to answer your question and this applies to anybody... There will come several times in one's career where you are faced with a tipping point to advance your career. You will have to take on risk to gain the reward. Sometimes it will mean doing work that is not ideal but keeping in mind the end-goal (knowledge). Did I want to work helpdesk initially? No, but I did it to gain relevant IT industry experience. Did I want to work 12hr shifts and weekends at a NOC? No, but I did it anyway to learn and grow my network knowledge. Did I want to leave a company I felt comfortable in after 5 years? No, but I did it anyway to take on new challenges to grow my career and knowledge.
    Currently Studying: IE Stuff...kinda...for now...
    My ultimate career goal: To climb to the top of the computer network industry food chain.
    "Winning means you're willing to go longer, work harder, and give more than anyone else." - Vince Lombardi
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Posts: 947Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    dontstop wrote: »
    I'm starting to think I'd be better to take the year off and study for my CCNP than spending that time in a NOC as most of the jobs I'd like to get are now asking for CCNP for their junior roles.

    I going the other way on this.

    I think it can be a good idea; just depends on how much EXP you correctly have.

    If you have very little... then you will have to stick around for a little while longer.

    Actually, let me rephrase.
    A year... might be a bit much.

    however, i'm planning on taking next summer off to dedicate towards my studies.
    I'm getting to a point where my day-to-day responsibilities are getting in the way of my further development (i work on a noc too).

    I'm definitely not a network-guru; but i can see myself getting limited... if i'm not careful.


    Taking a year off may be too extreme.... but maybe you can find a part-time job somewhere else?
    that way you have more time for studying (which is WHAT you really want)

    Edit:
    Or, maybe it's your current job that's the problem??
    if that's the case.... then definitely find another gig (even if it's just a lateral-move).

    :]
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