Routing and switching Sharing what i learned.. hope im ready for exam

FriendlyGalFriendlyGal Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
Hey guys im new to the tech world + these forums and i am also new to the CCNA. I just got finished reading all of both ICND1 and ICND2. But i wanted to make sure that i have a strong foundation before even attempting the exam. I made this post because not only do i want to understand Routing and switching but i also wanted to understand the Proper Terminology. As of right now i currently understand that routers forward ip packets that are "sent to a specific subnet" to a next hop ip. Meaning a router can only forward an ip packet as long as it has a match for a destination IP and the router can only forward an ip packet to an ip adress that's directly connected on the same LAN, which is fine since routers connect to multiple subnets and multiple lans thus making up the internet as a whole. I also came to find the difference between a host and a router. Hosts have a built in default route which allows the host to forward an ip packet that belongs to a subnet that's indirectly connected to a default router. if the destination ip is not local. I came to find that all static and dynamic routing is basically "Allowing the router to forward an ip packet. Static routing = manually allowing the router to forward an ip packet. "Dynamic routing"learning a route from a neighboring router(.
At the end of the day all ip packets are sent to an ip address that's directly connected on the same LAN.
I really don't have great grammar and spelling but i wanted to share my knowledge, and to verify that what im saying is clear and concise. I've studied for this exam all year and i think have a strong foundation of layer 3 redundancy , and layer 2 lan switching redundancy. Wish me luck guys... and sorry if i posted in the wrong forumn section lol.

Comments

  • HondabuffHondabuff Posts: 667Member
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    “The problem with quotes on the Internet is that you can’t always be sure of their authenticity.” ~Abraham Lincoln
  • Nik 99Nik 99 Posts: 152Member
    Hello there. Read through your post, your knowledge seems solid to me and your explaintions of routing IP packets made sense.
    a router can only forward an ip packet as long as it has a match for a destination IP and the router can only forward an ip packet to an ip adress that's directly connected on the same LAN, which is fine since routers connect to multiple subnets and multiple lans thus making up the internet as a whole

    Based on my own knowledge I'd make one amendment to what you said. Routers can only forward to an ip address thats directly connected or has a route in its routing table. Said routes that aren't directly connected are added via static routes or dyanmic routing protocols.

    At the end of the day all ip packets are sent to an ip address that's directly connected on the same LAN

    IP is only really concerned with getting packets to other networks, least that's my interpretation. It's the role of the MAC address to get data to a host on the same network. So maybe it's not incorrect to say packets go to networks and frames go to hosts/nodes.

    If anything I've put out there is incorrect please feel free to educate me. Still only learning ccna level networking myself too!

    Good luck to you friendlyGal with tackling the exams!
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