Offered permanent position, but have to leave temp contract

Ben1373Ben1373 Posts: 37Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi, I've just been offered a permanent position that I'm really excited about and believe I'll learn a lot there. The problem is, they want me to start in 2 weeks. I'm currently in the middle of a 2 month contract position, assisting with a project with a strict deadline(21st December). I am a bit hesitant about telling my employer that I will be leaving them two weeks before the deadline. What do I say to them? I'm worried that they will resent me for the 2 weeks and that I may burn a bridge. They've been so supportive with allowing me time off to attend interviews, with the idea of having a job after the deadline. Legally I'm not obliged to give notice, I'm doing this out of courtesy. Should I even take this job ? Thx

Comments

  • McxRisleyMcxRisley OSCP, CASP, CySA+, CPT+, Sec+, CEH, Splunk Admin Posts: 483Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Unfortunately nobody can make this decision but you. However, If it is a step in the direction that you want to take your career and its permanent, I would take the job since your current position is only temporary. I don't see any reason to have any loyalty towards a temp job, I'm sure they will understandand. If not who cares lol
    I'm not allowed to say what my previous occupation was, but let's just say it rhymes with architect.
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Posts: 2,268Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I'd take the job. You might try to be nice to the contract job only to have them let you go Dec 22nd when the project is done, meanwhile you passed on full time employment.
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Posts: 1,040Member
    Take my advice....

    Permanent is ALWAYS better then contracts.....

    Its better to have a regular perm job then a contract. don't worry about how they will feel. This is about you and your future. I could understand if you were there for 3 months already but the contract is only 2 months and then after that you will be looking for a new gig.

    Take the perm job!
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,716Mod Mod
    Take the job, who cares if they resent you? Especially if you give 2 weeks notice, which is the right thing to do.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • Bobby AxelrodBobby Axelrod Posts: 21Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'll echo the other members here and say take the perm job.

    That said, I'd let the appropriate people on the temp. side know ASAP. If they're human they will understand, despite the unfortunate timing, and hopefully with roughly 2 weeks notice they can pull off an audible and make it work.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,716Mod Mod
    I was on a temporary year long project. There was a group of 10 of us hired for this project. Some people left before 6 months to move on to other perm jobs. I left after a year (the project was prolonged for an additional 6 months). I gave my 2 week notice and I was even given a going away party. So, don't worry about leaving the project. It is a given that people will leave for perm positions...
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Posts: 3,277Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Take the job, who cares if they resent you? Especially if you give 2 weeks notice, which is the right thing to do.

    This.

    You're doing what most people do when they are about to leave a position. They think they are worth ALOT more to the company than what they actually are and that they will be devastated that you left. In some cases that might hold true, but in 99% of them it doesn't. This is especially true with contracting. Time to move on to better pastures. Gratz on the job!
  • N7ValiantN7Valiant Senior Member Posts: 360Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I'm new in the IT game, but I'm a bit confused about what contracting is. I was under the impression that you legitimately sign a legally binding contract agreeing to work for a set duration. I just wasn't sure that you could just walk out of a contract like that without legal penalties.

    I have this concern because I'll be doing an interview for a position where I expect to be on contract for a year. Because I'm currently 30 I was hoping to aggressively pursue certs and promotions and try to claw my way out of any entry-level position in 6 months(perhaps a bit too optimistic, but I'd still like to try). I know in other industries(like news media) the company can have you sign a "non-compete clause" in which you can't enter into a similar profession for a certain amount of time.
    MCSE: Core Infrastructure
    MCSA: Windows Server 2016
    CompTIA A+ | Network+ | Security+ CE
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,716Mod Mod
    N7Valiant wrote: »
    I'm new in the IT game, but I'm a bit confused about what contracting is. I was under the impression that you legitimately sign a legally binding contract agreeing to work for a set duration. I just wasn't sure that you could just walk out of a contract like that without legal penalties.

    I have this concern because I'll be doing an interview for a position where I expect to be on contract for a year. Because I'm currently 30 I was hoping to aggressively pursue certs and promotions and try to claw my way out of any entry-level position in 6 months(perhaps a bit too optimistic, but I'd still like to try). I know in other industries(like news media) the company can have you sign a "non-compete clause" in which you can't enter into a similar profession for a certain amount of time.

    Don't worry about the 'legal' stuff. When the shoe is on the other foot and the contract changes during the year and they lay you off, they could care less.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • BlackBeretBlackBeret Posts: 684Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Contracting has a few different meanings, but it almost never means you've signed a legally binding contract. Contracting in most contexts in IT means you're hired on for a specific contracted purpose, not a company employee, and as such will be paid 1099 (in the US), and the company will provide you with no benefits. Bob gets hired by IT solutions as a contractor. He's a contractor, he pays his own health insurance, IRA, self-employment taxes, etc. etc. Bob is not considered an employee of IT solutions. They can't override most states right to work laws, or any hire at will, fire at will type of laws. You're signing the contract stating that your job is temporary (the duration of the contract), for a specific purpose, and not to expect anything from the company.

    Contracting in the government contract sense is a bit different. These involve purchase contracts (for services in the case of IT) between the government and the contracting company. This is a legally binding contract that involves a lot of bidding, oversight, and laws. This is usually done by companies that specialize in government contracts. Northrup-Gruman might contract with the government, and they are legally required to provide the services in the contract. They typically hire full-time employees to the company, which are then considered contractors for the government. Northrup-gruman might hire Larry, give him a salary, benefits, vacation time, and other FTE benefits, but in conversation Larry is a "contractor" because he works for a contract company.

    In my area at least, I can't think of a single company that requires you to sign an exclusive contract or any states that would allow this. I know it exists somewhere in the world, just nowhere I've ever considered working.
  • N7ValiantN7Valiant Senior Member Posts: 360Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Ah, that makes sense. Thanks!

    That does make employment sound more complicated. In my retail job, I got insurance through my employer. Even when they wouldn't pay for it fully in my second job, it was still pretty decently subsidized compared to purchasing insurance by myself.

    Cost of living is high in Hawaii, high enough that even a $15/hr wage would be barely scraping through. I also got the sense that I was asking too much and $12 more be more in line for an entry-level job. Yet if I have to pay for my own health insurance it would be little better than working for free.
    MCSE: Core Infrastructure
    MCSA: Windows Server 2016
    CompTIA A+ | Network+ | Security+ CE
  • Fulcrum45Fulcrum45 Posts: 600Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Like everyone else I say take the job. Given that they allowed you the time off to interview elsewhere they had to know that this could happen. I'd give them the notice and let them decide how they want to be for the remaining 14 days. If there's a bridge to be burnt, let them be the ones to burn it.
  • TechGromitTechGromit A+, N+, GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Posts: 1,909Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    N7Valiant wrote: »
    I'm new in the IT game, but I'm a bit confused about what contracting is. I was under the impression that you legitimately sign a legally binding contract agreeing to work for a set duration. I just wasn't sure that you could just walk out of a contract like that without legal penalties.

    Yes, these kind of contracts do exist, but usually for a professional making a considerable amount of money. One example would be when a movie production company hires a star to do a movie. Having the star quit in the middle of a movie could cost the production company millions of dollars, so they have a vested interest in making the penalties for an actor not completing there contract obligation pretty high. But for most employment contracts, there is no such clause in effect, they are at will contracts. You would have to have some very specialized skills not easily duplicated for a contract to include penalties for failing to complete a contract and it would be for a substantial amount of money, not some $15 or $20 dollar an hour job. I think it's also important to point out that this is a two way street, if you have specialized desirable skills, you don't have to blindly sign what ever the employer places in from of you, you can negotiate clauses of your own, like if there are delays in the project you get paid X amount more, or if the project is cancelled for when ever reason, they still owe your full contract amount stipulated by the contract.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Ben1373 wrote: »
    Hi, I've just been offered a permanent position that I'm really excited about and believe I'll learn a lot there. The problem is, they want me to start in 2 weeks. I'm currently in the middle of a 2 month contract position, assisting with a project with a strict deadline(21st December). I am a bit hesitant about telling my employer that I will be leaving them two weeks before the deadline. What do I say to them? I'm worried that they will resent me for the 2 weeks and that I may burn a bridge. They've been so supportive with allowing me time off to attend interviews, with the idea of having a job after the deadline. Legally I'm not obliged to give notice, I'm doing this out of courtesy. Should I even take this job ? Thx

    Take the perm job.

    I work a project/contact that was supposed to go for a year......... well guess what...?

    Things slowed down and it only lasted 6 months. I was let go, and I learned others were let go a month later.

    In the contracting game, the clients are priority number 1, NOT the contractors.


    What to say? Tell them you found a permanent position.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • Basic85Basic85 Senior Member Posts: 176Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm assuming the new employer knows about your temp job? Have you tried negotiating on the start date? Sometimes that is possible. Was there a reason for a 2 week start date? Do they have a project coming up or did someone else left? Having said all of that, I would take the permanent position so as long as you're comfortable with the new employer.

    Just tell them that you've found another opportunity and will be putting in a courtesy notice. How they react really shouldn't matter as you must put your needs first.
  • MitMMitM Posts: 592Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Like the others have said, take the permanent position. Don't let that opportunity pass you by.

    You mentioned the perm position "wants" you to start in two weeks. Do they "need" you to start in two weeks? Maybe you can delay it an extra week to help out the temp job some more. If not (and if you want to), maybe you can work some extra hours for the remaining two weeks to help move the project along.

    In the end, they have no choice but to understand. It's business
  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Posts: 535Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    If you're excited and you think the permanent job is right for you, leave the temp job. Temp staffing agencies know full well that people are there, well, temporarily. I've turned down positions countless times from temp agencies, it hasn't affected their outlook towards me, when they need positions filled, they always still contact me.
    Of course as others said, depart in a professional manner, respectful. You don't want to burn bridges.
  • TechGromitTechGromit A+, N+, GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Posts: 1,909Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    MitM wrote: »
    Like the others have said, take the permanent position. Don't let that opportunity pass you by.

    You mentioned the perm position "wants" you to start in two weeks. Do they "need" you to start in two weeks? Maybe you can delay it an extra week to help out the temp job some more. If not (and if you want to), maybe you can work some extra hours for the remaining two weeks to help move the project along.

    I wouldn't even ask them, if they want you to start in 2 weeks, start in 2 weeks. Your disposable to the contracting company when they are finished with you, you owe them no loyalty.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • N7ValiantN7Valiant Senior Member Posts: 360Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    TechGromit wrote: »
    I wouldn't even ask them, if they want you to start in 2 weeks, start in 2 weeks. Your disposable to the contracting company when they are finished with you, you owe them no loyalty.
    Unless your new employer turns out to be even bigger a-holes than the last one, and word has spread about your tendencies when you end up needing to find another temp job.

    But I will grant you that offering professional courtesy might not necessarily mean anything. I gave my 2 weeks notice to my boss in retail when it became clear that he was going to work me 40+ hours doing graveyard shifts on top of full-time college in spite of the fact that I was always officially "part-time" status ever since I started. Yeah I gave the notice instead of just walking out the door, but it didn't mean I would ever put my boss down as a professional reference.
    MCSE: Core Infrastructure
    MCSA: Windows Server 2016
    CompTIA A+ | Network+ | Security+ CE
  • Bjones1976Bjones1976 Posts: 20Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I always ask myself "what would they do if the shoe was on the other feet?" In other words, if they needed to end the contract, would they give you notice or would you hear about it the day of? My experience has been both. If you have good relationship with them, give them a heads up or you could even go straight to your temp agency contact. I would definitely take the permanent position though.
    Ben1373 wrote: »
    Hi, I've just been offered a permanent position that I'm really excited about and believe I'll learn a lot there. The problem is, they want me to start in 2 weeks. I'm currently in the middle of a 2 month contract position, assisting with a project with a strict deadline(21st December). I am a bit hesitant about telling my employer that I will be leaving them two weeks before the deadline. What do I say to them? I'm worried that they will resent me for the 2 weeks and that I may burn a bridge. They've been so supportive with allowing me time off to attend interviews, with the idea of having a job after the deadline. Legally I'm not obliged to give notice, I'm doing this out of courtesy. Should I even take this job ? Thx
  • McxRisleyMcxRisley OSCP, CASP, CySA+, CPT+, Sec+, CEH, Splunk Admin Posts: 483Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Contracts do exist where a company can restrict you from going to work for thier competitors or doing the exact same type of work for a customer. These are "Non-compete" or "Non-solicitation" contracts. I have signed 2 of them in my life and if a company did actually try to prevent you from working for a competitor or something because you signed one fo these, they don't really hold up well in court :) A company cannot prevent you from making a living. They mainly do things like these to prevent employees from having the thought of leaving.
    I'm not allowed to say what my previous occupation was, but let's just say it rhymes with architect.
  • macariusmacarius Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    yes take the perm Job, you don't actually owe anything to your current contract employer.
  • TechGromitTechGromit A+, N+, GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Posts: 1,909Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    McxRisley wrote: »
    These are "Non-compete" or "Non-solicitation" contracts. I have signed 2 of them in my life and if a company did actually try to prevent you from working for a competitor or something because you signed one fo these, they don't really hold up well in court :) A company cannot prevent you from making a living. They mainly do things like these to prevent employees from having the thought of leaving.

    The only problem is you may still have to hire a lawyer and go to court to get this clause throw out of court, which could be expensive. The best way to avoid this is not to sign them in the first place.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • EANxEANx Posts: 1,078Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    McxRisley wrote: »
    Contracts do exist where a company can restrict you from going to work for thier competitors or doing the exact same type of work for a customer. These are "Non-compete" or "Non-solicitation" contracts. I have signed 2 of them in my life and if a company did actually try to prevent you from working for a competitor or something because you signed one fo these, they don't really hold up well in court :) A company cannot prevent you from making a living. They mainly do things like these to prevent employees from having the thought of leaving.

    They also do them to have the threat of suing the company that employed you. I ran into that once 15 years ago. I got laid off and was about to be hired by a competitor when my former company said they might consider legal action. I didn't get hired and since everything was in phone calls, I had no evidence.
  • Bjcheung77Bjcheung77 Posts: 89Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    OP/Original Poster, you're thinking way too much in this scenario. I had a similar thing happen to me 9 years ago, I was going on vacation for two weeks and I got hired, I canceled my vacation and worked those two weeks and left the job a happy camper... I was recommended by co-workers to this new position and another but decided on the current Technical Analyst position instead of a Medical Imaging - System Administrator job...

    What you can do, if you want to "stay for a little longer" is to ask your new employer if they need you right away and can you start Dec 22nd or later after Xmas/New year. Sign the contract that you'll start working on that day with the new employer and let your old boss know you're leaving after the 22nd...

    What I failed to mention was I personally burned those bridges, as I sent 4 long emails to the Manager and Director about what changes may need to happen and gave them my opinion on things, and even to the lady in HR who did the exit interviews, I worked there for 7.5 years and at this current position for 9 years, it's "night vs day", even though the $ or benefits is not that much more than the old job, it's the way they micromanage you...
  • LarryTRLarryTR Posts: 56Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    You said your contract employer allowed you to leave work for interviews. This means they were well aware you might be leaving prematurely. Not to mention, as a company who hires temps, they already are aware of/used to this.

    Therefore, take the permanent job.

    HOWEVER, in the future, if you ever come across this situation again....

    AFTER your new employer offers you a job, kindly tell them that, IF POSSIBLE, you would like to finish your contract with your temp company (assuming there are only a few weeks to go). But make it clear that you are OK with not finishing your contract. If they say OK, fine. If not, oh well, you tried. Leave it up to your new employer to decide whether you finish the contract or not.

    Bottom line is, you gotta look out for #1.
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