Must know skills ?

Ungadunga911Ungadunga911 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hello, i was trying to figure out what areas i should be well rounded with the most coming out of this degree.

https://home.usm.edu/academics/undergraduate-programs/information-technology

Im about half way through studying for my ICND1 and half to put that on hold and use the rest of August to refresh for and Adv linux admin course im taking this semester sense it was two years ago in which i took my intro to linux and haven't used it sense. From what i gather on job requirements online the list is very extensive. When it comes to server i know how to add roles and features but not that much more, i have 3 windows server classes under my belt but as time passes i don't use it so i end up forgetting most of it. For now the only thing i can think of passing the CCNA whenever i am able to find the time to study and start from ground on through CBT on windows server.

Comments

  • soccarplayer29soccarplayer29 CISSP, CISA, PMP Posts: 229Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'm not sure I understand the question but I'll give it a go.

    If you're asking what jobs the degree program intends to prepare you for:
    • Network Admin
    • System Admin
    If you're going the developer track then that program would give you some programming and software development skills.

    If you're asking what additional skills you should learn outside of this curriculum it would depend on your passion and what type of positions you're interested in but I'd suggest:
    • Virtulization
    • Cloud
    • Python/Scripting
    • CI/CD
    Certs: CISSP, CISA, PMP
  • Ungadunga911Ungadunga911 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Sorry, in short i forgot most of what i have learned through this degree cause i never use it outside of class and its always on to something new and completely different so im constantly worried about what i should at least know when leaving, i have one year left and im done. I have googled it many times but in your opinion, whats the difference between a network admin and system admin. Im not a fan of programming, i dont mind working with server and routing and switching, its not the funnest thing to do but its a job right.
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Posts: 1,773Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I certainly understand how you are feeling. I would not stress to much about not remembering everything right now. It is normal to study something and know the specifics at the time but only retain the general ideas in the future.

    I suggest you maintain a general understand of the topics you have learned then refresh yourself on the ones required when you start working. Technology always changes so you have to catch up on topics anyway. Having past training should allow you to pick up the information faster when you actually need to apply them.

    Good Luck!
    Jon

    Just to add an example to this. I took a couple beginner level programming and SQL classes. I can not even begin to program or work with databases but it still helps me follow someone else's scripts when I am looking to automate something. If I become responsible for creating scripts in the future I would need to refresh these skills before I could do it effectively.
  • yoba222yoba222 Posts: 1,055Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    It looks like it's right there on the front page:
    1) Network cabling
    2) OSI versus TCP/IP model
    3) Active Directory
    4) Web page design with PHP, HTML, and CSS
    5) Unix administration using Linux
    6) Advanced router techniques
    2017: GCIH | LFCS
    2018: CySA+ | PenTest+ |CCNA CyberOps
    2019: VHL 20 boxes
    2020: OSCP | CISSP
  • Ungadunga911Ungadunga911 Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Your write, that kinda sucks cause i spent 3 days on cabling my first year and barley made it through HTML the first year and havnt made a web page sense. As for linux, this semester i get to take a second stab at it, hopefully it sticks, then their is the router techniques which im currently working on from ground up to pass me ICND1. I dont know what it is about the program, but allot of guys i know that are about to graduate said their not gona try for their ccna cause its to hard, even though i agree im still working towards it cause as of now everything on that front page i dont know much about. Its crazy, i learned more in 2 weeks through cbt nuggets than 2 years at a junior through netacde, i guess that explains why everyone i know with the AAS in computer networking is currently unemployed or still working at their non related IT job.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Posts: 3,277Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    allot of guys i know that are about to graduate said their not gona try for their ccna cause its to hard

    Bet these are gonna be the same people that graduate with a degree and wonder why they can't get a good paying job. Then complain about student debt and how bad the job market is these days.... icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Mike RMike R Posts: 148Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Everyone learns things a bit differently. A lot of times though you really learn (and remember) it when your putting it into practice. Building a lab or having to do what your learning in your daily job is really the best. Just because you don't have total recall of something right off hand doesn't mean you've forgotten it, but once you see it your familiar with it and can pick it back up a lot faster than someone learning it for the first time.

    For instance I've crawled through various firewalls and no way can I remember where every knob and lever is. But once I get back into it, the knowledge comes back pretty quick. The most important thing is to always have a desire to soak whatever info you can, when someone willfully quits learning in IT they need to get out.
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Posts: 1,773Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I dont know what it is about the program, but allot of guys i know that are about to graduate said their not gona try for their ccna cause its to hard,

    Don't be them. Take the test and if you fail take it again. The CCNA is hard and that is why it still holds value.

    When I took the classes with about 20 people only 3 of us took the CCNA exam. About half of the class looked up the netacad answers on the internet and never even did the work. If you want a career in IT show the hiring manager that you not only took the classes but you followed up with the certification. Someone will give you a chance but you need to take advantage of it.

    Good Luck,
    Jon
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Jon_Cisco wrote: »
    Don't be them. Take the test and if you fail take it again. The CCNA is hard and that is why it still holds value.

    When I took the classes with about 20 people only 3 of us took the CCNA exam. About half of the class looked up the netacad answers on the internet and never even did the work. If you want a career in IT show the hiring manager that you not only took the classes but you followed up with the certification. Someone will give you a chance but you need to take advantage of it.

    Good Luck,
    Jon

    Met a network engineer with 15 years of service finally get this a few years back. He said he learned some stuff from it.......
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