Instead of graduating high school, getting GED after sophomore year

DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMPPosts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
Thoughts on the idea of getting your GED and instead of going the last two years to high school, use that valuable time to go to the community college?

Any draw backs that you can see? The state I am in allows you to get your GED if you are 16, if you have 16 units of high school and not be enrolled in high school. Which this young adult wouldn't be at that point, it would be between years, in the summer.

The young adult I am talking about, has taken physics and Algebra 1. This year, they will be taking geometry and trig / algebra 2. The idea here is if they can pass both courses with a B+ or higher and do reasonably well in the other classes the transition would be set to take place.

The thought is to take the GED and get a pass, back up plan is to go to high school junior year.

Thoughts?
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Comments

  • joelsfoodjoelsfood Posts: 1,027Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    You might want to consider child labor laws in your locale. Just a thought, but children dropping out of school to work has been out of the norm for a year or 80.

    Also, what's the plan from there? What career prospects, short term or long term, do you foresee for a 16yo with their GED? What's the end game?
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Community college for sure, 2 years then transitioning to a bachelors program. For the 2 years at the community college she will stay at home with us, then eventually going off unless she elects for a university around the area.

    By the time she graduates she will be 20 years old, maybe 21 so labor laws shouldn't effect her ability to work.

    This isn't a anxiety deal or reclusiveness, she plays sports, she's a setter on her volleyball team this year, JV. This is something she brought up and I am exploring the options to even see if it's feasible, and it is.....

    https://www.passged.com/state/missouri
  • EANxEANx Posts: 1,078Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I'd say that if a kid has a degree, no one cares about diploma vs GED. It's tough to get a regular job under 18 but it would be good to get going a year or two early in college.

    I would be concerned about socialization though. Only part of work is about getting things done, the rest is about working with other people. My biggest concern with any young person would be how well they socialize with others. And I'd be looking for specific examples of where they did well. Extra-curricular activities here would be a +1. Communication skills would be my next worry. Address both of those and you're probably golden.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    To be completely honest she is a fantastic communicator. No issues speaking to adults or speaking up. Ran into some "project drama" freshman year and directly engaged the instructor handled it beautifully.

    Doesn't smoke or use drugs, we've been very clear about this. The probability of becoming an Alcoholic if you start drinking before 21 is insanity. My goal as a father is to position my kids for them to succeed. If she wants to back out after this year, then all is well she can go to the highschool for 4 years. There is 0 pressure in regards to that. Only her STEM classes I focus on and demand B+ or higher or there is hell to pay if she doesn't hit those targets. (AKA air pods, ipad etc......).

    But that's just how I have things set up.....
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,539Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Thoughts on the idea of getting your GED and instead of going the last two years to high school, use that valuable time to go to the community college?
    Putting this as sensitively as possible, this makes zero sense if it wasn't a life forced situation.

    High schools offer AP courses and I have known several people who had a year or two knocked off a four year degree just by taking these advanced courses.....PLUS the student gets the age appropriate social interaction from still going to high school either full time or sometimes AP classes have you go to the community college. What happens if a 16 year old goes to college classes? Well the student is too young to hangout with a lot of classmates in the college courses, and will start to live a very different life than the high school students.....it's not a good proactive choice to make to just go GED then to CC unless you have to.

    Sports? Well that is out of the question... 16 year olds vs up to 19-21 year olds? Big difference in ability and coaches actually have to win to keep their job unlike in high school many times.

    Another weird thing is how do you take physics before you have even taken a more advanced math than algebra? First thing when I google math requirement for physics...."If you haven't mastered algebra, then you won't be able to master calculus, which is a physics prerequisite".

    To be totally honest here, this sounds a lot like you are pushing the issue. Plain and simple, kids do not know best....even if she is dead set on this...the idea is total insanity. Since you brought up drinking and smoking...in high school kids are obviously 18 or younger making these kinds of activities quite rare in the grand scheme of things....once you start getting into college years, even if people aren't 21....they know people, have fake IDs, etc. and it becomes a very different social atmosphere. I think you are underestimating the potential for some pretty serious issues that frankly she probably isn't equipped to handle...peer pressure is a reality unless you are gonna be there holding her hand all day long.

    Did I say this idea is insane?
  • BlackBeretBlackBeret Posts: 684Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I actually had a friend in HS do this exact thing. Dropped out and got his GED at 16, community college, then transfered to finish at a four year university. BS in Comp Sci at 20, got a decent developer gig in colorado and moved for it. Still in that area from what I see on FB, but haven't really talked much since he graduated. If I could go back, I'd probably do the same thing. I see nothing wrong with it as long as you finish at least an Associates at CC.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Here was the course description from her freshman year. She takes all the challenging courses. I want her to push herself and besides she is highly intelligent so why not?

    She has taken Algebra 1 and 2 in the 7th and 8th grade and then took it again second semester at the high school. There was some overlap but it was review so all is well. She'll be transitioning to Trig / Algebra 2 and Geometry this next semester. She'll be ready for the community college, in fact some of the courses will probably be easier than the high school courses she is taking.

    SCIENCE DEPARTMENTCourse DescriptionsConceptual PhysicsRequired: Grade 9Conceptual physics is a laboratory science course with an emphasis on the scientific method and the fundamental principles of physics. This course is designed to provide students with a foundation for further study in biology, chemistry, and the advanced science courses. Topics to be covered include: basic science skills, Newton’s laws, linear motion, momentum, work, and energy. Students will apply algebraic skills to problem solving throughout the course.

    Most of the kids received D's and C's she received an B+.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,117Mod Mod
    I agree with the socializing aspect. I would let the kiddo be a kid right now and maybe look for part time jobs or internships during the summer. She might feel out of place among older kids in college even if it's community college.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    I appreciate all the feedback, the community is very good for that. Ultimately it's up to her, I guide and try to steer, but I like to provide them with options and if it make sense and it's feasible and they want to do it, I will generally support them unless it's something goofy.

    I'd like to get her through the AA in Mathematics and get her to transition into one of the more established schools. I've been looking around and there are a lot of good Mathematics programs, and even some other version, such as actuarial science and applied mathematics.
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Posts: 1,539Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    http://www.techexams.net/forums/jobs-degrees/133145-16-year-olds-getting-developer-jobs.html

    Why do you hate the high school education system so much? I mean you are already planning on your 10 year old dropping out of high school for his GED...and your 16 year old....why don't you just home school them?
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    @ Techguru that was just a post around a theory more than anything. He is coding everyday or nearly and that will remain I was just curious about getting into development IF he enjoys it and why wait to 18 if he is already built up a strong set of skills at the age of 16.

    We've loaded him up on summer camps at the local "quasi ivy league" school and he has really taken off, in fact a few of these graduate students (CS Masters) have really taken a liking towards Luke and talk to him fairly regularly on Roblox and some other chat engine. Now he is going through CBT modules getting some exposure to the basics and even some intermediate development. "BTW The camp was really pricey but he gave him a really strong foundation"

    They are mutual exclusive. My daughter has brought this up on her own..... Of course I influenced a little bit :)
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    Life is short and childhood is even shorter. Let the kids be kids, within reason of course. They'll have plenty of time to be an adult.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCPosts: 889Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I live in Missouri and I know many students who excelled in high school academically that was able to utilize the CC credits by taking advanced classes and they were actually able to get their AS degree BEFORE they graduated high school with their peers. In fact, many students who aren't top tier academically are able to get their AS degree at HS graduation by using these programs. And much of this is at little cost to the families to do this type of program. I wish they had the full program like this when I was in HS, but I was at least able to take some core classes from the CC in my HS.

    I'd explore this avenue. In my town they have this https://sta.lsr7.org/missouri-innovation-campus/ for students who want to get into STEM degrees. This pretty much shows you how it can be applied for her. And she can still participate in sports as well.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Posts: 3,277Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    TechGuru80 wrote: »
    Why do you hate the high school education system so much?

    I don't know about other people, but I thought high school was a complete joke... I was in advanced math classes my entire time with kids a grade or 2 above me too. Granted I didn't get amazing grades in them. But I really didn't try or care to. Again, thought it was a joke. Got good enough grades to get into a decent state college...

    I don' t see anything wrong with the plan myself, as long as it is completely the kid's decision. Which sounds like he is giving them the option to choose.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,117Mod Mod
    I have no doubt your daughter is probably a very smart and good girl. If it were me personally though, I wouldn't want to set her apart her from peers in her own age group and throw her into situations with a ton of adult coworkers and adult schoolmates. Even if she's good, she's going to feel subtle pressures to fit in with an older crowd. It may not be illegal or a big deal for them to date, hookup, go for drinks after work/class, smoke weed, etc since they're 18+ but having a 16 year old around is either going to alienate her or put a little pressure on her to fit in more. Trust me when I say that alienation never feels good for a kid that age. No matter how mature they may act externally, kids brains are still developing until around the age of 25 and their teens are where they're developing socially and emotionally the most. That's a delicate ecosystem there that you have to balance to make sure they're raised correctly.

    BTW, I'm speaking from someone who had a very abnormal high school experience between home school and extremely restrictive boarding schools. I never had prom, got to participate in sports, date, learn to drive at 16, socialize normally, go out with friends, etc and it definitely affected me through my early 20's to not have those normal high school experiences. It took awhile for me to stop being an introvert and the ways I went about getting out of my shell in my early 20s were not the best. I think there's ways to get her those college credits like MeanDrunk said and his idea is really great but still let her experience high school as a normal kid. If she wants to get a job or to practice on the side, there's summer internships, contract gigs, etc. My big brother did IT and developer work for one of my dad's companies during the summer when he was in high school too. It was good for him and gave him a solid savings as well.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • PCTechLincPCTechLinc CISSP, CHFI, CEH, MCSA Server 2008, Project+, Security+ce, Server+, Network+, A+ King City, CAPosts: 624Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I'll be the Devil's Advocate here. I took the California High School Proficiency Exam when I was 16 in order to get out of High School early. I was a computer nerd that everyone picked on, and I finally got tired of it. Went straight into technical college for 3 Associate's degrees, and it ended up being the best choice I ever made. I never looked back.

    That's how it played out for me about 20 years ago, so I have no idea if things would pan out similarly now, or in a different area.
    Master of Business Administration in Information Technology Management - Western Governors University
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  • volfkhatvolfkhat Posts: 947Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    it's a free country. so you/she can do whatever you want.

    But in general, this country likes putting people in Boxes... easier to control that way.

    With that being said,
    i work with 2 people who are highschool dropouts (both got their GED).

    One had anxiety issues while in HS,
    The other was frequently stuffed into lockers (or so he claims).

    Mr Anxiety is a great person. he's a millennial, and forced me to reevaluate the value of their generation :]
    Mr Locker... well... uhhhh... yeah.... he's mid 30's and probably needs some counseling.


    I guess my point; going the GED route is probably more common than we think.
    As long as your Daughter continues straight into community college; i dont really see the problem...
  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Posts: 1,054Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    My daughter dropped out of high school and earned a GED. She scored among the highest percentile for that test. Once enrolled in community college, she made the dean's list repeatedly. Her high school grades were, shall we say, less than great. She really excelled in college because she found an environment that suited her learning style. She was also much happier in college than she ever was in high school. I, of course, have always been proud of her and have always encouraged her to follow her own path.

    Everyone learns and grows in different ways. Yes, let kids be kids. But also, let them figure out what works best for them on their own. Just give them advice and the occasional nudge along the way. <Resisting urge to sing Diff'rent Stokes theme. Must...not...sing...must...get...back...to Enterprise....>
  • ClmClm 5th Raikage (AWS) / Cloud Sec Senpai Posts: 443Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Once you have a degree who actually cares about a HS diploma? I have never been asked to show my diploma since I got my AA
    I find your lack of Cloud Security Disturbing!!!!!!!!!
    Connect with me on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/myerscraig

  • TechnicalJayTechnicalJay Posts: 213Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Not sure about the U.S. if you can get your GED at home but here in Canada I had 3 friends drop out of HS at 17 and two years later they went to get their GED. I drove one of them to the GED school once and the majority of people there were not a good influence and there's a lot more drama there than HS.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy SABSA, GCFA, GPEN, CISM, RHCE, Security+, Server+, eJPT, CCNA Posts: 4,048Mod Mod
    I would let them find a hobby they enjoy and focus all their energy on that. Something like soccer, tennis, Gymnastics, dancing, MMA...anything really. They will have a lifetime to work on career later....
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • yoba222yoba222 Posts: 1,055Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I don't know the answer for sure, but I wonder if this might complicate any potential career as a military officer.
    2017: GCIH | LFCS
    2018: CySA+ | PenTest+ |CCNA CyberOps
    2019: VHL 20 boxes
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  • dave330idave330i Posts: 2,091Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    @DatabaseHead - Does your daughter's HS offer opportunities to take honors & AP STEM classes during her junior and senior years? If so, why not eliminate 1 year of college vs. 2 years of HS?
    -HS is "free" while you have to pay for college
    -2 year age difference is pretty big at her current age, but 1 year by the time she graduates from college isn't.
    -While STEM classes are important, the non-STEM classes she can take during the last 2 years of HS can make her a more interesting, well rounded person.
    2018 Certification Goals: Maybe VMware Sales Cert
    "Simplify, then add lightness" -Colin Chapman
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCPosts: 889Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    dave330i wrote: »
    @DatabaseHead - Does your daughter's HS offer opportunities to take honors & AP STEM classes during her junior and senior years? If so, why not eliminate 1 year of college vs. 2 years of HS?
    -HS is "free" while you have to pay for college
    -2 year age difference is pretty big at her current age, but 1 year by the time she graduates from college isn't.
    -While STEM classes are important, the non-STEM classes she can take during the last 2 years of HS can make her a more interesting, well rounded person.

    This is something that I posted earlier. He had linked to a law in Missouri about getting the GED at 16, however I know that there are many schools in the state that have tech/stem based courses that a student can take their JR and Sr years which will get them not only a HS diploma, but a full AS in Computer Science or another STEM related degree. This way she can still graduate at 20 and at least finish HS with her peers.
  • jcundiffjcundiff Posts: 486Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    @DatabaseHead, Check and see if your area has a program like we do here, it is called the Rowan County Early College Academy, going into their junior year in high school, kids who meet some pretty stringent (grades, ACT, classes completed, etc) requirements can apply for the academy. If accepted to the program, their junior and senior year of high school is spent taking classes at our local university ( or community college, student's choice). My son is going into his senior year of high school as well as his sophomore year of college.

    When he graduates high school, he will have 60 hours of college. Additionally, he is still able to play football and run track (hurdles) for the high school, participate in NHS, and all other extra-curricular activities at the high school. The cost of the program is roughly 800 dollars a semester, (3200 for the two years) saving me about 15 grand off his 4 year degree :O. He went from being a 4.0 student to a 3.4(1st semester)/3.8 (2nd) in his adjustment from high school level courses to college. The program is really a controlled transition from high school to college and has been great with my son.
    "Hard Work Beats Talent When Talent Doesn't Work Hard" - Tim Notke
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    There is a lot to digest in this thread. Let me review and follow back up, I am very appreciative of you all taking the time to provide your insights.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,117Mod Mod
    This is something that I posted earlier. He had linked to a law in Missouri about getting the GED at 16, however I know that there are many schools in the state that have tech/stem based courses that a student can take their JR and Sr years which will get them not only a HS diploma, but a full AS in Computer Science or another STEM related degree. This way she can still graduate at 20 and at least finish HS with her peers.


    I would add one more food for thought: Depends on which university she wants to get into as well. If you're going for ivy league/top 10 schools, then high school honors classes, extracurricular activities, etc are going to be critical for the process. I get going to community college for the first 2 years to save money and transferring but if you're transfering to an EXTREMELY competitive school like MIT or Caltech, it's going to take a lot more than a 4.10 GPA at community college. They look at everything from the beginning of high school and on because they're so highly sought after that they can afford to be that picky.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • mactexmactex CISSP, GCIA, GCED, GSEC, GCCC, CCNA Cyber Ops, A+, N+, S+ Posts: 80Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I personally know four people (2 are family) who started their own businesses and are self-made millionaires. All high school drop-outs. I am not necessarily condoning dropping out of high school; I am only saying that it does inhibit growth for some.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCPosts: 889Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I would add one more food for thought: Depends on which university she wants to get into as well. If you're going for ivy league/top 10 schools, then high school honors classes, extracurricular activities, etc are going to be critical for the process. I get going to community college for the first 2 years to save money and transferring but if you're transfering to an EXTREMELY competitive school like MIT or Caltech, it's going to take a lot more than a 4.10 GPA at community college. They look at everything from the beginning of high school and on because they're so highly sought after that they can afford to be that picky.

    I totally get the point you are making. If someone is looking to jump into a Harvard or other ivy league or prestigious university, then they absolutely should have impeccable grades and extra-curricular activities and clubs/courses that they need to take to have a chance to get into them.

    The program i mentioned in my area is something that they offer to high performing students with a desire to focus on that for their career. They usually don't allow C/D students into that program unless they test very well. (Many students get poor grades due to being bored and not due to intelligence) It's not a traditional AP course, but it's definitely not something that would be easy for many.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,117Mod Mod
    @MeanDrunk - totally. I like the program you're talking about. I was just posting also directly about just dropping the GED, working, and doing community college (OP's original post)
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
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