Is it possible to use a Bachelor Degree in Network Operation and Security for Software development?

IT_helperIT_helper Registered Users Posts: 11 ■■□□□□□□□□

So i'm working on my BS: Network Operation and Security degree at WGU, and I was wondering if I don't like networking, could I still use that degree to apply for developer jobs like Front End Development or Software Development?

What should i do?

Comments

  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,520 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited January 2019
    You can, do you know how to develop?  Do you have a github rep where you store you code?  Do you have any projects you have hosted for review?  

    Most likely you'll need a body of work to show if you don't have prior experience.  
  • IT_helperIT_helper Registered Users Posts: 11 ■■□□□□□□□□
    edited January 2019
    No i don't know how to develop but i did take 2 courses at WGU for Web development and it work out pretty good. I don't have anything on Github. I don't have any projects for review as of right now, but planning to have some in the future. I don't have a portfolio yet. But I'm planning to build a portfolio as soon as i can.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,520 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited January 2019
    I think you start there and see if your passion continues to grow and what you churn out.   Have you looked at internships?  They can be relaxed on experience and get some potential experience of your own.  That degree alone isn't going to get you a full time development position, unless like I said earlier you get an internship or find a short term project even then it might be a stretch.  You'll most likely be going against computer science majors so even internships might be tough.  

    You could look for application support positions that carry an element of development or testing.  I've seen that particular strategy implemented and be quite successful for non cs majors getting into development. Some folks tout those code academy's but I don't know much about them.
  • MontagueVandervortMontagueVandervort Senior Member Member Posts: 399 ■■■■■□□□□□
    It depends on what you mean by the word "use".

    Do you mean will someone looking to hire a developer purposefully be looking to hire someone with that degree? No

    Do you mean will someone looking to hire a developer be open to hiring someone with that degree? It depends (you'll need experience to be considered... and hey, the degree will at least meet HR reqs at the very least). More difficult path this way, IMO. If you really decide to do this, I suggest switching your degree, instead.

    Do you mean will you be able to use the knowledge from the degree for developing? Yes, the networking knowledge will absolutely help. Most of the developers I have met (too many) know absolutely nothing about networking, and let's face it... this isn't a positive thing.

    Forget about knowing anything about hardware, they never do... but you have your A+. This is great.
  • yoba222yoba222 Senior Member Member Posts: 1,109 ■■■■■■■■□□
    The auxiliary knowledge gained in the degree can be helpful here and there. But no code example projects you say? Good luck! Would you hire an artist without actually seeing any of his or her artwork? Saying that you took two classes on paintbrush selection and color theory isn't going to be enough. I'd start planning and coding up projects today if I were you.
    2017: GCIH | LFCS
    2018: CySA+ | PenTest+ |CCNA CyberOps
    2019: VHL 20 boxes
    2020: OSCP 2020
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