Learning Coding vs More Certifications

tjb122982tjb122982 Posts: 255Member ■■■□□□□□□□
Currently, I am working as a tier 1 Desktop Support tech with almost 3 years of experience and I have a question about is it better to dive deep and get more certifications (Windows, Linux, Cisco etc.) or branch out and learn coding (HTML, CSS. Java, Python, SQL etc) to expand in a different sense. I am not of the mind that it is a either or question but it would it wise expand my skill set fairly early so I can always have options and variety?

Comments

  • bigdogzbigdogz Posts: 522Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I will have to agree with EANx. Creating a wider foundation of knowledge will help you on your path. As time goes on you may drift into a specific arena.

    Good luck!
  • jumblerrjumblerr Member New York, NYPosts: 101Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Agreed with previous posters. Wider range of experience shows not only breadth and depth of experience, but a willingness to learn and not stay in a comfort zone. Potential employers like that!
  • Pmorgan2Pmorgan2 CISSP, A+/Net+/Sec+/Project+, ITIL v3, CIW SDA & WSP Posts: 95Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Like EANx said, build a wide base of knowledge.  You never know what skill will get you that promotion or new job.  Having a large pool of skills increases your value and proves adeptness.

    If you're looking for something specific I would recommend picking up Powershell knowledge and use it to automate things in your current position.  After you're comfortable writing little scripts and are ready to to get into larger programs (ones that call methods, access databases, have persistent interfaces) look towards A) Python for automation B) Perl/MySQL for databases C) Java for applications D) HTML/CSS/Javascript for web.  Or whatever your current company uses or what you see being asked for in your dream positions.

    Simultaneously, expand your knowledge of Windows Server, Linux, virtualization, security, and project management.  Dig deeper on ones you find interesting and/or ones that seem to directly help your current & future position.
    2019 Goals: ITIL Foundation, Project+CIW Site Development Associate, CIW Web Security Professional, CCSP, ECIH, ECES, WGU BSCSIA
  • mikey88mikey88 CISSP, CySA+, Security+, Network+ and others Posts: 440Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    My vote is more certifications unless you want to get into web dev track full time. I learned html/css on the side for fun just by building a couple web sites. 
    Certs: CISSP, CySA+, Security+, Network+ and others | 2019 Goals: Cloud Sec/Scripting/Linux

  • yoba222yoba222 Posts: 980Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    I don't work as a developer but I did spend a few months learning HTML/CSS and then a few months learning Python and then same with SQL. To me it was kind of like learning how to drive stick shift. Most of the time it's an unneeded skill, but 1-2 times per year it's really convenient to be the only one on the team in a pinch to solve an issue that comes up using those extra skills.
    Obtained: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | CySA+ | PenTest+ | CAPM | eJPT | CCNA R&S | CCNA CyberOps | GCIH | LFCS
    2019: Virtual Hacking Labs then OSCP
  • securitychopssecuritychops OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, Pentest+, Security+, SLAE, SLAE64 Posts: 52Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I tend to lean towards everyone needing to get at least some basic coding skills early in their IT career.  Being able to whip up a small script, or application, to quickly automate something has been an incredibly valuable skillset to have over the years.
    Current Certs   : OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, Pentest+, Security+, SLAE, SLAE64
    Goals for 2019 : OSEE
    Goals for 2020 : OSWE
  • amandacooperamandacooper Posts: 11Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Pmorgan2 said:
    Like EANx said, build a wide base of knowledge.  You never know what skill will get you that promotion or new job.  Having a large pool of skills increases your value and proves adeptness.

    If you're looking for something specific I would recommend picking up Powershell knowledge, you can read about it  and use it to automate things in your current position.  After you're comfortable writing little scripts and are ready to to get into larger programs (ones that call methods, access databases, have persistent interfaces) look towards A) Python for automation B) Perl/MySQL for databases C) Java for applications D) HTML/CSS/Javascript for web.  Or whatever your current company uses or what you see being asked for in your dream positions.

    Simultaneously, expand your knowledge of Windows Server, Linux, virtualization, security, and project management.  Dig deeper on ones you find interesting and/or ones that seem to directly help your current & future position.
    Agree with you 100%. The more you know the better. When you have a certain knowledge base, it's easier to improve them in a new position.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,469Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited March 18
    Certs are easier to learn and quicker to get ROI on IMO (with some exceptions of course).  Software Dev is a lifestyle and needs to be project based.  I am "learning" C# but I won't really learn it until I am working projects using it.  It's how I learned VBA and eventually SQL.  I had to get in the ring and get knocked out a few times......  
  • rsxwithslicksrsxwithslicks Member Posts: 75Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    While I like the idea of a well rounded individual, I would suggest learning a little coding. The way the future seems to be going, its only going to grow as things like infrastructure are going to be less important  as it becomes IaaS.
  • LionelTeoLionelTeo Posts: 526Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    My personal recommendation is to read books that apply actual domain knowledge and less of certification books that have "x success rate of passing y certification". You can learn a lot more reading books that are written by very experienced people instead of people who are experienced in helping people to obtain certifications. 
  • MrNetTekMrNetTek 41 certificate exams, 51 training certificates, and a bachelor's and master’s degree. Posts: 87Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited July 31
    Diversify your skill set with coding. The industry is saturated with people who can "do" IT. There are far fewer people that can code and do the hands-on part of IT. But....whether you get more certs or not, you probably still need to continue learning more about IT, generally speaking. Just don't forget about it.

    For coding, save your projects---build a portfolio. 


    -MrNetTek at your service-
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  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+; CCNA R&S; CCNP R&S Posts: 882Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I would say figure out how to do some of your tasks with powershell during the day and study for a cert after work.
  • SteveLavoieSteveLavoie Posts: 646Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Which certification do you have now ? I looked at your profile and I didnt see one. If this is the case, I would suggest you to get a few one (A+, Network+, Sec+, maybe a Microsoft certs for desktop) to fortify your resume. 

    Then any coding knowledge will serve you eventually, so start to learn Python or Powershell, or something that would be useful quickly. 

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