Technical Diagramming for Enterprise

DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMPMember Posts: 2,501 ■■■■■■■■■□
edited April 2019 in IT Jobs / Degrees
Just curious what role does this for the most part in your opinion?  System Engineer, Architect?  Capturing system relations and data and network flow?

Trying to create a position for such a role......

Thanks

Comments

  • paul78paul78 Member Posts: 3,016 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Are you referring to a role whose primary value is to create technical diagrams? I've never seen such a dedicated role other than perhaps a tech writer that works with an architect to document/prettify that sort of information.

    Personally, I believe that any architect/engineer/developer should be able to communicate their designs and data flows by creating their own documents.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,501 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited April 2019
    Thanks for the reply

    We see that as a waste of time having a Dev's documenting diagrams.   Generally speaking the work is shoddy, they really don't want to do that type of work.....  The objective is to bring it all together with some standardization....  Not a bunch of one off's floating around Sharepoint.   (There are artifacts that can be leveraged so they have some documentation).

    I was doing some digging, the top title tied to that task in my area is a business system analyst.....   I don't think I agree with that title though....  

    I'll continue to do some review and follow back up if I find something....

    Looks like BA is tied to this task as well......  

    This will require a ton of coordination, interviewing system SME's, high skilled with diagramming tools, such as Visio, understanding API's, EDI, Database, ERP from a high level and flow level.....   
  • paul78paul78 Member Posts: 3,016 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Yeah - BSA's are probably the closest title and role if there's an expectation that the role understands the product and is more closely aligned to the tech/product team. But if it's closer to someone that is mostly just taking notes and interviewing SMEs, then that's a tech writer, imo.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,501 ■■■■■■■■■□
    edited April 2019
    paul78 said:
    Yeah - BSA's are probably the closest title and role if there's an expectation that the role understands the product and is more closely aligned to the tech/product team. But if it's closer to someone that is mostly just taking notes and interviewing SMEs, then that's a tech writer, imo.
    Thanks for your expertise, appreciate it.  Agreed just taking artifacts and flipping them into diagrams is a tech writer, no question about it.  This is more in the weeds.  With that said I am not comfortable calling them either....    :smile:

    For example they will need to understand the objectives of the API's what is getting updated etc.  Same with EDI, which documents do what and when...  850, PO, 945 Ack.  Etc.... 
  • paul78paul78 Member Posts: 3,016 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Thanks for your expertise, appreciate it.  Agreed just taking artifacts and flipping them into diagrams is a tech writer, no question about it.  This is more in the weeds.  With that said I am not comfortable calling them either....    :smile:

    For example they will need to understand the objectives of the API's what is getting updated etc.  Same with EDI, which documents do what and when...  850, PO, 945 Ack.  Etc.... 
    Perhaps it's industry specific. But what you describe does sound exactly like a bsa to me. In the past, I had bsa's tied to engineers/architects on the agile teams. The ba's would develop the business and product requirements and the bsa's would work with the architects or lead engineers to create the functional specs.

  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,501 ■■■■■■■■■□
    paul78 said:
    Thanks for your expertise, appreciate it.  Agreed just taking artifacts and flipping them into diagrams is a tech writer, no question about it.  This is more in the weeds.  With that said I am not comfortable calling them either....    :smile:

    For example they will need to understand the objectives of the API's what is getting updated etc.  Same with EDI, which documents do what and when...  850, PO, 945 Ack.  Etc.... 
    Perhaps it's industry specific. But what you describe does sound exactly like a bsa to me. In the past, I had bsa's tied to engineers/architects on the agile teams. The ba's would develop the business and product requirements and the bsa's would work with the architects or lead engineers to create the functional specs.


    paul78 said:
    Yeah - BSA's are probably the closest title and role if there's an expectation that the role understands the product and is more closely aligned to the tech/product team. But if it's closer to someone that is mostly just taking notes and interviewing SMEs, then that's a tech writer, imo.
    REALLY appreciate your input.  BSA it is...   Your check is in the mail for your consulting fee's.   Wait you cost to much ;)
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