Are wireless headsets as bad as people say?

victorjohn9211victorjohn9211 Member Posts: 13 ■■■□□□□□□□
I have heard from the people regarding radiation of the wireless or Bluetooth headsets. Many of them are too bad for our body, is it true?

Comments

  • PCTechLincPCTechLinc CISSP, CHFI, CEH, MCSA Server 2008, Project+, Security+ce, Server+, Network+, A+ King City, CAMember Posts: 641 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I'm a very skeptical person, and I never worried about it during my time selling them at RadioShack.  I know there are studies that measure the output power between standby and in-use, but I don't think there is anything definitive.  But then again, just breathing causes cancer... at least in California.
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  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I've read it is the bluetooth technology that gives off the radiation.  So not just wireless headphones... every bluetooth device.   But also that these bluetooth devices give off a tenth of what cell phones give off... So if you aren't worried about using your cell phone.  You definitely shouldn't be worried about the headphones.
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 946 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Look up the recommended distance for keeping your cell phone away from your head. I would lean towards it being bad, but no one seems to care.

    I think reading about Tim Ferriss doing an experiment and keeping a cell phone in his front pocket affected his sperm cell count.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,882 Mod
    What happens if you keep it in the back pocket? Curious minds want to know.
  • MrNetTekMrNetTek 41 certificate exams, 51 training certificates, and a bachelor's and master’s degree. Member Posts: 100 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited November 2019
    There is no real evidence that supports wireless headsets are bad for you. If that were true, all the gamers would be dying or dead. MANY things give off radiation....it's the amount that is significant. Radiation from Bluetooth tech just doesn't qualify as a significant amount. You're more likely to die from Doritos and sugary drinks, than radiation from Bluetooth. 

    -MrNetTek at your service-
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 946 ■■■■■■■□□□
    What happens if you keep it in the back pocket? Curious minds want to know.
    I’d imagine it would be similar to the front pocket.
  • joelsfoodjoelsfood Member Posts: 1,027 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I would recommend researching ionizing vs non-ionizing radiation and then make the decision for yourself.  Personally, I make use of wireless/BT headsets every day with no concern.
  • mizterkewlmizterkewl Member AgrabahMember Posts: 122 ■■■□□□□□□□
    What happens if you keep it in the back pocket? Curious minds want to know.
    hip replacement lol
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,407 ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited September 2019
    MrNetTek said:
    There is no real evidence that supports wireless headsets are bad for you. If that were true, all the gamers would be dying or dead. MANY things give off radiation....it's the amount that is significant. Radiation from Bluetooth tech just doesn't qualify as a significant amount. You're more likely to die from Doritos and sugary drinks, than radiation from Bluetooth. 


    -MrNetTek at your service-

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    True.  Everything in moderation.  

    I watch the news and one month they saw coffee is bad for, and you should avoid drinking.  The next month they saw you should have at least 2-3 cups of coffee a day. 

    I would be more worried about losing my hearing if the head phones were turned up to loud, then the possibility of radiation. 
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  • advanex1advanex1 CASP, MCSA 2016, MCSA 2012, CCNA, Security+, Network+, Project+, Server+ Member Posts: 364 ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited September 2019
    I don't use wireless headsets after my experience. Apparently it was operating very closely if not on the same band as my Wireless APs and so there was a lot of static/interference. Good ol' hard wire for me.

    https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/radiation/cell-phones-fact-sheet

    Cell phones, but interesting.
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  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 946 ■■■■■■■□□□
    It looks like Apple updated their notice from the last time I read it.  If anyone is interested the notice can be found on the iPhone by navigating to these settigs:

    Settings > General > About > Legal > RF Exposure

    The notice says:

    ”iPhone has been tested and meets applicable limits for radio frequency (RF) exposure.

    Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) refers to the rate at which the body absorbs RF energy. The SAR limit is 1.6 watts per kilogram in countries that set the limit averaged over 1 gram of tissue and 2.0 watts per kilogram in countries that set the limit averaged over 10 grams of tissue. During testing, iPhone radios are set to their highest transmission levels and placed in positions that simulate uses against the head, with no separation, and when worn or carried against the torso of the body, with 5mm separation.

    To reduce exposure to RF energy, use a hands-free option, such as the built-in speakerphone, the supplied headphones, or other similar accessories. Cases with metal parts may change the RF performance of the device, including its compliance with RF exposure guidelines, in a manner that has not been tested or certified.

    SAR values for this device are available at: www.apple.com/legal/rfexposure/iPhone10,1/en/

    Although this device has been tested to determine SAR in each band of operation, not all bands are available in all areas. Bands are dependent on your service provider’s wireless and roaming networks.”

    It would be interesting if RF exposure was linked to increased autism rates.
  • BarbaradsBarbarads Member Posts: 16 ■■■□□□□□□□
    “Although there’s been substantial research on the health risks associated with EMFs, there’s been very little on the safety of long-term radiation exposure from Bluetooth or wireless headphones, according to Joel M. Moskowitz, PhD, the director of the Center for Family and Community Health at University of California, Berkeley.”
  • bigdogzbigdogz Member Posts: 847 ■■■■■■■□□□
    I am glad I can read because I can't hear what you type.... LOL

    Seriously, I try not to use headsets at all as it seems to make my hearing worse over time. I try to keep the volume minimal as to mitigate any issues.
  • DFTK13DFTK13 Member Posts: 171 ■■■■□□□□□□
    What happens if you keep it in the back pocket? Curious minds want to know.
    Butt cancer
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